• RCW 38 is a deeply embedded young (~1 Myr), massive star cluster located at a distance of 1.7 kpc. Twice as dense as the Orion Nebula Cluster, orders of magnitude denser than other nearby star forming regions, and rich in massive stars, RCW 38 is an ideal place to look for potential differences in brown dwarf formation efficiency as a function of environment. We present deep, high resolution adaptive optics data of the central ~0.5x0.5 pc^2 obtained with NACO at the Very Large Telescope. Through comparison with evolutionary models we determine masses and extinction for ~480 candidate members, and derive the first Initial Mass Function (IMF) of the cluster extending into the substellar regime. Representing the IMF as a set of power laws in the form dN/dM~M^(-alpha), we derive the slope alpha = 1.60+-0.13 for the mass range 0.5 - 20 MSun which is shallower than the Salpeter slope, but in agreement with results in several other young massive clusters. At the low-mass side, we find alpha = 0.71+-0.11 for masses between 0.02 and 0.5 MSun, or alpha = 0.81+-0.08 for masses between 0.02 and 1 MSun. Our result is in agreement with the values found in other young star-forming regions, revealing no evidence that a combination of high stellar densities and the presence of numerous massive stars affect the formation efficiency of brown dwarfs and very-low mass stars. We estimate that the Milky Way galaxy contains between 25 and 100 billion brown dwarfs (with masses > 0.03 MSun).
  • Brown dwarf disks are excellent laboratories to test our understanding of disk physics in an extreme parameter regime. In this paper we investigate a sample of 29 well-characterized brown dwarfs and very low mass stars, for which Herschel far-infrared fluxes as well as (sub)-mm fluxes are available. We have measured new Herschel PACS fluxes for 11 objects and complement these with (sub)-mm data and Herschel fluxes from the literature. We analyze their spectral energy distributions in comparison with results from radiative transfer modeling. Fluxes in the far-infrared are strongly affected by the shape and temperature of the disk (and hence stellar luminosity), whereas the (sub)-mm fluxes mostly depend on disk mass. Nevertheless, there is a clear correlation between far-infrared and (sub)-mm fluxes. We argue that the link results from the combination of the stellar mass-luminosity relation and a scaling between disk mass and stellar mass. We find strong evidence of dust settling to the disk midplane. The spectral slopes between near- and far-infrared are mostly between $-0.5$ and $-1.2$ in our sample, comparable to more massive T Tauri stars, which may imply that the disk shapes are similar as well, though highly-flared disks are rare among brown dwarfs. We find that dust temperatures in the range of 7-15 K, calculated with $T\approx25\,(L/L_\odot)^{0.25}$ K, are appropriate for deriving disk masses from (sub)-mm fluxes for these low luminosity objects. About half of our sample hosts disks with at least one Jupiter mass, confirming that many brown dwarfs harbour sufficient material for the formation of Earth-mass planets in their midst.
  • The transmission of news stories in global culture has changed fundamentally in the last three decades. The general public are alerted to breaking stories on increasingly rapid timescales, and the discussion/distortion of facts by writers, bloggers, commenters and Internet users can also be extremely fast. The narrative of a news item no longer belongs to a small cadre of conventional media outlets, but is instead synthesised to some level by the public as they select where and how they consume news. The IAA Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) post-detection protocols, initially drafted in 1989 and updated in 2010, were written to guide SETI scientists in the event of detecting evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence, but do not give guidance as to how scientists should prepare to navigate this media maelstrom. The protocols assume communications channels between scientists and the public still resemble those of 1989, which were specifically one-way with a narrative controlled by a select few media outlets. Modern SETI researchers must consider this modern paradigm for consumption of news by the public, using social media and other non-traditional outlets, when planning and executing searches for extraterrestrial intelligence. We propose additions to the post-detection protocols as they pertain to the use of internet and social media, as well as pre-search protocols. It is our belief that such protocols are necessary if there is to be a well-informed, sane global conversation amongst the world's citizens following the discovery of intelligent life beyond the Earth.
  • Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters -- SONYC -- is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of substellar objects in nearby star-forming regions. We present new spectroscopic follow-up of candidate members in Chamaeleon-I (~2 Myr, 160 pc) and Lupus 3 (~1 Myr, 200 pc), identified in our earlier works. We obtained 34 new spectra (1.5 - 2.4 mum, R~600), and identified two probable members in each of the two regions. These include a new probable brown dwarf in Lupus 3 (NIR spectral type M7.5 and Teff=2800 K), and an L3 (Teff=2200 K) brown dwarf in Cha-I, with the mass below the deuterium-burning limit. Spectroscopic follow-up of our photometric and proper motion candidates in Lupus 3 is almost complete (>90%), and we conclude that there are very few new substellar objects left to be found in this region, down to 0.01 - 0.02 MSun and Av \leq 5. The low-mass portion of the mass function in the two clusters can be expressed in the power-law form dN/dM \propto M^{-\alpha}, with \alpha~0.7, in agreement with surveys in other regions. In Lupus 3 we observe a possible flattening of the power-law IMF in the substellar regime: this region seems to produce fewer brown dwarfs relative to other clusters. The IMF in Cha-I shows a monotonic behavior across the deuterium-burning limit, consistent with the same power law extending down to 4 - 9 Jupiter masses. We estimate that objects below the deuterium-burning limit contribute of the order 5 - 15% to the total number of Cha-I members.
  • We present the results of a multi-wavelength study of circumstellar discs around 44 young stellar objects in the 3 Myr old nearby Chamaeleon I star-forming region. In particular, we explore the far-infrared/submm regime using Herschel fluxes. We show that Herschel fluxes at 160-500$\,\mu$m can be used to derive robust estimates of the disc mass. The median disc mass is 0.005$M_{\odot}$ for a sample of 28 Class IIs and 0.006$M_{\odot}$ for 6 transition disks (TDs). The fraction of objects in Chamaeleon-I with at least the `minimum mass solar nebula' is 2-7%. This is consistent with previously published results for Taurus, IC348, $\rho$ Oph. Diagrams of spectral slopes show the effect of specific evolutionary processes in circumstellar discs. Class II objects show a wide scatter that can be explained by dust settling. We identify a continuous trend from Class II to TDs. Including Herschel fluxes in this type of analysis highlights the diversity of TDs. We find that TDs are not significantly different to Class II discs in terms of far-infrared luminosity, disc mass or degree of dust settling. This indicates that inner dust clearing occurs independently from other evolutionary processes in the discs.
  • SONYC -- Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters -- is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of substellar objects in nearby star-forming regions. We present a new imaging and spectroscopic survey conducted in the young (~1 Myr), nearby (~200 pc) star-forming region Lupus 3. Deep optical and near-infrared images were obtained with MOSAIC-II and NEWFIRM at the CTIO-4m telescope, covering ~1.4 sqdeg on the sky. The i-band completeness limit of 20.3 mag is equivalent to 0.009-0.02 MSun, for Av \leq 5. Photometry and 11-12 yr baseline proper motions were used to select candidate low-mass members of Lupus 3. We performed spectroscopic follow-up of 123 candidates, using VIMOS at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), and identify 7 probable members, among which 4 have spectral type later than M6.0 and Teff \leq 3000K, i.e. are probably substellar in nature. Two of the new probable members of Lupus 3 appear underluminous for their spectral class and exhibit emission line spectrum with strong Halpha or forbidden lines associated with active accretion. We derive a relation between the spectral type and effective temperature: Teff=(4120 +- 175) - (172 +- 26) x SpT, where SpT refers to the M spectral subtype between 1 and 9. Combining our results with the previous works on Lupus 3, we show that the spectral type distribution is consistent with that in other star forming regions, as well as is the derived star-to-BD ratio of 2.0-3.3. We compile a census of all spectroscopically confirmed low-mass members with spectral type M0 or later.
  • Massive clusters in our Galaxy are an ideal testbed to investigate the properties and evolution of high mass stars. They provide statistically significant samples of massive stars of uniform ages. To accurately determine the intrinsic physical properties of these stars we need to establish the distances, ages and reddening of the clusters. One avenue to achieve this is the identification and characterisation of the main sequence members of red supergiant rich clusters. Here we utilise publicly available data from the UKIDSS galactic plane survey. We show that point spread function photometry in conjunction with standard photometric decontamination techniques allows us to identify the most likely main sequence members in the 10-20Myr old clusters RSGC1, 2, and 3. We confirm the previous detection of the main sequence in RSGC2 and provide the first main sequence detection in RSGC1 and RSGC3. There are in excess of 100 stars with more than 8Msun identified in each cluster. These main sequence members are concentrated towards the spectroscopically confirmed red supergiant stars. We utilise the J-K colours of the bright main sequence stars to determine the K-band extinction towards the clusters. The differential reddening is three times as large in the youngest cluster RSGC1 compared to the two older clusters RSGC2 and RSGC3. Spectroscopic follow up of the cluster main sequence stars should lead to more precise distance and age estimates for these clusters as well as the determination of the stellar mass function in these high mass environments.
  • We present new high contrast imaging of 8 L/T transition brown dwarfs using the NIRC2 camera on the Keck II telescope. One of our targets, the T3.5 dwarf 2MASS J08381155 + 1511155, was resolved into a hierarchal triple with projected separations of 2.5+/-0.5 AU and 27+/-5 AU for the BC and A(BC) components respectively. Resolved OSIRIS spectroscopy of the A(BC) components confirm that all system members are T dwarfs. The system therefore constitutes the first triple T-dwarf system ever reported. Using resolved photometry to model the integrated-light spectrum, we infer spectral types of T3, T3, and T4.5 for the A, B, and C components respectively. The uniformly brighter primary has a bluer J-Ks color than the next faintest component, which may reflect a sensitive dependence of the L/T transition temperature on gravity, or alternatively divergent cloud properties amongst components. Relying on empirical trends and evolutionary models we infer a total system mass of 0.034-0.104 Msun for the BC components at ages of 0.3-3 Gyr, which would imply a period of 12-21 yr assuming the system semi-major axis to be similar to its projection. We also infer differences in effective temperatures and surface gravities between components of no more than ~150 K and ~0.1 dex. Given the similar physical properties of the components, the 2M0838+15 system provides a controlled sample for constraining the relative roles of effective temperature, surface gravity, and dust clouds in the poorly understood L/T transition regime. Combining our imaging survey results with previous work we find an observed binary fraction of 4/18 or 22_{-8}^{+10}% for unresolved spectral types of L9-T4 at separations >~0.1 arcsec. This translates into a volume-corrected frequency of 13^{-6}_{+7}%, which is similar to values of ~9-12% reported outside the transition. (ABRIDGED)
  • Within the SONYC - Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters - survey, we investigate the frequency of free-floating planetary-mass objects (planemos) in the young cluster NGC1333. Building upon our extensive previous work, we present spectra for 12 of the faintest candidates from our deep multi-band imaging, plus seven random objects in the same fields, using MOIRCS on Subaru. We confirm seven new sources as young very low mass objects (VLMOs), with Teff of 2400-3100K and mid-M to early-L spectral types. These objects add to the growing census of VLMOs in NGC1333, now totaling 58. Three confirmed objects (one found in this study) have masses below 15 MJup, according to evolutionary models, thus are likely planemos. We estimate the total planemo population with 5-15 MJup in NGC1333 is <~8. The mass spectrum in this cluster is well approximated by dN/dM ~ M^-alpha, with a single value of alpha = 0.6+/-0.1 for M<0.6Msol, consistent with other nearby star forming regions, and requires alpha <~ 0.6 in the planemo domain. Our results in NGC1333, as well as findings in several other clusters by ourselves and others, confirm that the star formation process extends into the planetary-mass domain, at least down to 6 MJup. However, given that planemos are 20-50 times less numerous than stars, their contribution to the object number and mass budget in young clusters is negligible. Our findings disagree strongly with the recent claim from a microlensing study that free-floating planetary-mass objects are twice as common as stars - if the microlensing result is confirmed, those isolated Jupiter-mass objects must have a different origin from brown dwarfs and planemos observed in young clusters.
  • SONYC - Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters - is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of substellar objects with masses down to a few times that of Jupiter in nearby star-forming regions. For the ~1Myr old rho Ophiuchi cluster, in our earlier paper we reported deep, wide-field optical and near-infrared imaging using Subaru, combined with 2MASS and Spitzer photometry, as well as follow-up spectroscopy confirming three likely cluster members, including a new brown dwarf with a mass close to the deuterium-burning limit. Here we present the results of extensive new spectroscopy targeting a total of ~100 candidates in rho Oph, with FMOS at the Subaru Telescope and SINFONI at the ESO's Very Large Telescope. We identify 19 objects with effective temperatures at or below 3200 K, 8 of which are newly identified very-low-mass probable members of rho Oph. Among these eight, six objects have Teff <= 3000 K, confirming their likely substellar nature. These six new brown dwarfs comprise one fifth of the known substellar population in \rho Oph. We estimate that the number of missing substellar objects in our survey area is ~15, down to 0.003 - 0.03 MSun and for Av = 0 - 15. The upper limit on the low-mass star to brown dwarf ratio in rho Oph is 5.1 +- 1.4, while the disk fractions are ~40% and ~60% for stars and BDs, respectively. Both results are in line with those for other nearby star forming regions.
  • SONYC - Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters - is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of substellar objects with masses down to a few times that of Jupiter in nearby star-forming regions. In this third paper, we present our recent results in the Chamaeleon-I star forming region. We have carried out deep optical and near-infrared imaging in four bands (I, z, J, Ks) using VIMOS on the ESO Very Large Telescope and SOFI on the New Technology Telescope, and combined our data with mid-infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The survey covers ~0.25 sqdeg on the sky, and reaches completeness limits of 23.0 in the I-band, 18.3 in the J-band, and 16.7 in Ks-band. Follow-up spectroscopy of the candidates selected from the optical photometry (I <~ 21) was carried out using the multi-object spectrograph VIMOS on the VLT. We identify 13 objects consistent with M spectral types, 11 of which are previously known M-dwarfs with confirmed membership in the cluster. The 2 newly reported objects have effective temperatures above the substellar limit. We also present two new candidate members of Chamaeleon-I, selected from our JK photometry combined with the Spitzer data. Based on the results of our survey, we estimate that the number of missing very-low-mass members down to ~0.008 MSun and Av <= 5 is <= 7, i.e. <= 3% of the total cluster population according to the current census.
  • The origin of the lowest mass free-floating objects -- brown dwarfs and planetary-mass objects -- is one of the major unsolved problems in star formation. Establishing a census of young substellar objects is a fundamental prerequisite for distinguishing between competing theoretical scenarios. Such a census allows us to probe the initial mass function (IMF), binary statistics, and properties of accretion disks. Our SONYC (Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters) survey relies on extremely deep wide-field optical and near-infrared imaging, with follow-up spectroscopy, in combination with Spitzer photometry to probe the bottom end of the IMF to unprecedented levels. Here we present SONYC results for three different regions: NGC 1333, rho Ophiuchus and Chamaeleon-I. In NGC 1333, we find evidence for a possible cutoff in the mass function at 10-20 Jupiter masses. In rho Oph we report a new brown dwarf with a mass close to the deuterium-burning limit.
  • SONYC - Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters - is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of brown dwarfs down to masses below the Deuterium burning limit in nearby star forming regions. In this second paper, we present results on the ~1 Myr old cluster Rho Ophiuchi, combining our own deep optical and near-infrared imaging using Subaru with photometry from the 2-Micron All Sky Survey and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Of the candidates selected from iJKs photometry, we have confirmed three -- including a new brown dwarf with a mass close to the Deuterium limit -- as likely cluster members through low-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also identify 27 sub-stellar candidates with mid-infrared excess consistent with disk emission, of which 16 are new and 11 are previously spectroscopically confirmed brown dwarfs. The high and variable extinction makes it difficult to obtain the complete sub-stellar population in this region. However, current data suggest that its ratio of low-mass stars to brown dwarfs in similar to those reported for several other clusters, though higher than what was found for NGC 1333 in Scholz et al. 2009.
  • Identifying the population of young stellar objects (YSOs) in high extinction regions is a prerequisite for studies of star formation. This task is not trivial, as reddened background objects can be indistinguishable from YSOs in near-infrared colour-colour diagrams. Here we combine deep JHK photometry with J- and K-band lightcurves, obtained with UKIRT/WFCAM, to explore the YSO population in the dark cloud IC1396W. We demonstrate that a colour-variability criterion can provide useful constraints on the star forming activity in embedded regions. For IC1396W we find that a near-infrared colour analysis alone vastly overestimates the number of YSOs. In total, the globule probably harbours not more than ten YSOs, among them a system of two young stars embedded in a small (~10000 AU) reflection nebula. This translates into a star forming efficiency SFE of ~1%, which is low compared with nearby more massive star forming regions, but similar to less massive globules. We confirm that IC1396W is likely associated with the IC1396 HII region. One possible explanation for the low SFE is the relatively large distance to the ionizing O-star in the central part of IC1396. Serendipitously, our variability campaign yields two new eclipsing binaries, and eight periodic variables, most of them with the characteristics of contact binaries.
  • We present the combined results of three photometric monitoring campaigns targeting very low mass (VLM) stars and brown dwarfs in the young open cluster IC4665 (age ~40 Myr). In all three runs, we observe ~100 cluster members, allowing us for the first time to put limits on the evolution of spots and magnetic activity in fully convective objects on timescales of a few years. For 20 objects covering masses from 0.05 to 0.5 Msol we detect a periodic flux modulation, indicating the presence of magnetic spots co-rotating with the objects. The detection rate of photometric periods (~20%) is significantly lower than in solar-mass stars at the same age, which points to a mass dependence in the spot properties. With two exceptions, none of the objects exhibit variability and thus spot activity in more than one season. This is contrary to what is seen in solar-mass stars and indicates that spot configurations capable of producing photometric modulations occur relatively rarely and are transient in VLM objects. The rotation periods derived in this paper range from 3 to 30h, arguing for a lack of slow rotators among VLM objects. The periods fit into a rotational evolution scenario with pre-main sequence contraction and moderate (40-50%) angular momentum losses due to wind braking. By combining our findings with literature results, we identify two regimes of rotational and magnetic properties, called C- and I-sequence. Main properties on the C-sequence are fast rotation, weak wind braking, Halpha emission, and saturated activity levels, while the I-sequence is characterised by slow rotation, strong wind braking, no Halpha emission, and linear activity-rotation relationship. Rotation rate and stellar mass are the primary parameters that determine in which regime an object is found. (abridged)
  • SONYC -- Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters -- is a survey program to investigate the frequency and properties of substellar objects with masses down to a few times that of Jupiter in nearby star-forming regions. Here we present the first results from SONYC observations of NGC1333, a ~1Myr old cluster in the Perseus star-forming complex. We have carried out extremely deep optical and near-infrared imaging in four bands (i', z', J, K) using Suprime-Cam and MOIRCS instruments at the Subaru telescope. The survey covers 0.25sqdeg and reaches completeness limits of 24.7mag in the i'-band and 20.8mag in the J-band. We select 196 candidates with colors as expected for young, very low-mass objects. Follow-up multi-object spectroscopy with MOIRCS is presented for 53 objects. We confirm 19 objects as likely brown dwarfs in NGC1333, seven of them previously known. For 11 of them, we confirm the presence of disks based on Spitzer/IRAC photometry. The effective temperatures for the brown dwarf sample range from 2500K to 3000K, which translates to masses of ~0.015 to 0.1Ms. For comparison, the completeness limit of our survey translates to mass limits of 0.004Ms for Av<~5mag or 0.008Ms for Av<~ 10mag. Compared with other star-forming regions, NGC1333 shows an overabundance of brown dwarfs relative to low-mass stars, by a factor of 2-5. On the other hand, NGC1333 has a deficit of planetary-mass objects: Based on the surveys in SOrionis, the ONC and Cha I, the expected number of planetary-mass objects in NGC1333 is 8-10, but we find none. It is plausible that our survey has detected the minimum mass limit for star formation in this particular cluster, at around 0.012-0.02Ms. If confirmed, our findings point to significant regional/environmental differences in the number of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass of the IMF. (abridged)
  • The properties of accretion disks around stars and brown dwarfs in the SOri cluster (age 3 Myr) are studied based on NIR time series photometry supported by MIR spectral energy distributions. We monitor ~30 young low-mass sources over 8 nights in the J- and K-band using the duPont telescope at Las Campanas. We find three objects showing variability with J-band amplitudes >0.5 mag; five additional objects exhibit low-level variations. All three highly variable sources have been previously identified as highly variable; thus we establish the long-term nature of their flux changes. The lightcurves contain periodic components with timescales of ~0.5-8 days, but have additional irregular variations superimposed -- the characteristic behaviour for classical T Tauri stars. Based on the colour variability, we conclude that hot spots are the dominant cause of the variations in two objects, including one likely brown dwarf, with spot temperatures in the range of 6000-7000 K. For the third one (#2), a brown dwarf or very low mass star, inhomogenities at the inner edge of the disk are the likely origin of the variability. Based on mid-infrared data from Spitzer, we confirm that the three highly variable sources are surrounded by circum-(sub)-stellar disks. They show typical SEDs for T Tauri-like objects. Using SED models we infer an enhanced scaleheight in the disk for the object #2, which favours the detection of disk inhomogenities in lightcurves and is thus consistent with the information from variability. In the SOri cluster, about every fifth accreting low-mass object shows persistent high-level photometric variability. We demonstrate that estimates for fundamental parameters in such objects can be significantly improved by determining the extent and origin of the variations.
  • Rotation is a key parameter in the evolution of stars. From 1 Myr (the age of the ONC) to 4.5 Gyr (the age of the Sun), solar-like stars lose about 1-2 orders of specific angular momentum. The main agents for this rotational braking are believed to be star-disk interaction and magnetically powered stellar winds. Over the last decade, the observational fundament to probe the stellar spindown has dramatically improved. Significant progress has been made in exploring the underlying physical causes of the rotational braking. Parameterized models combining the effects of star-disk interaction, winds, and pre-main sequence contraction are able to reproduce the main features of the rotational data for stars spanning more than 3 orders of magnitude in age. This has allowed us to constrain stellar ages based on the rotation rates ('gyrochronology'). One main challenge for future work is to extend this type of analysis to the substellar mass range, where the rotational database is still sparse. More theoretical and observational work is required to explore the physics of the braking processes, aiming to explain rotational evolution from first principles. In this review for Cool Stars 15, I will summarize the status quo and the recent developments in the field.
  • IRAS04325+2402C is a low luminosity object located near a protostar in Taurus. We present new spatially-resolved mm observations, near-infrared spectroscopy, and Spitzer photometry that improve the constraints on the nature of this source. The object is clearly detected in our 1.3 mm interferometry map, allowing us to estimate the mass in a localized disk+envelope around it to be in the range of 0.001 to 0.01Ms. Thus IRAS04325C is unlikely to accrete significantly more mass. The near-infrared spectrum cannot be explained with an extincted photosphere alone, but is consistent with a 0.03-0.1Ms central source plus moderate veiling, seen in scattered light, confirming the edge-on nature of the disk. Based on K-band flux and spectral slope we conclude that a central object mass >~0.1Ms is unlikely. Our comparison of the full spectral energy distribution, including new Spitzer photometry, with radiative transfer models confirms the high inclination of the disk (>~80deg), the very low mass of the central source, and the small amount of circumstellar material. IRAS04325C is one of the lowest mass objects with a resolved edge-on disk known to date, possibly a young brown dwarf, and a likely wide companion to a more massive star. With these combined properties, it represents a unique case to study the formation and early evolution of very low mass objects.
  • Characterizing multiplicity in the very low mass (VLM) domain is a topic of much current interest and fundamental importance. Here we report on a near-IR AO imaging survey of 31 young brown dwarfs and VLM stars, 28 of which are in Chamaeleon I, using the ESO VLT. Our survey is sensitive enough to detect equal mass binaries down to separations of 0.04-0.07" (6-10 AU at 160 pc) and, typically, companions with mass ratios as low as 0.2 outside of 0.2" (~30 AU). We resolve the suspected 0.16" (~26 AU) binary Cha_Halpha 2 and present two new binaries, Hn 13 and CHXR 15, with separations of 0.13" (~20 AU) and 0.30" (~50 AU); the latter is one of the widest VLM systems discovered to date. We do not find companions around the majority of our targets, giving a binary frequency of 11% [+9,-6], thus confirming the trend for a lower binary frequency with decreasing mass. By combining our work with previous surveys, we arrive at the largest sample of young VLMOs (72) with high angular resolution imaging to date. Its multiplicity fraction is in statistical agreement with that for VLMOs in the field. In addition we note that many field stellar binaries with lower binding energies and/or wider cross sections have survived dynamical evolution and that statistical models suggest tidal disruption by passing stars is unlikely to affect the binary properties of our systems. Thus, we argue that there is no significant evolution of multiplicity with age among brown dwarfs and VLM stars in OB and T associations between a few Myr to several Gyr. Instead, the observations to date suggest that VLM objects are either less likely to be born in fragile multiple systems than solar mass stars or such systems are disrupted very early.
  • The cluster Praesepe (age 650 Myr) is an ideal laboratory to study stellar evolution. Specifically, it allows us to trace the long-term decline of rotation and activity on the main-sequence. Here we present rotation periods measured for five stars in Praesepe with masses of 0.1-0.5Ms -- the first rotation periods for members of this cluster. Photometric periodicities were found from two extensive monitoring campaigns, and are confirmed by multiple independent test procedures. We attribute these variations to magnetic spots co-rotating with the objects, thus indicating the rotation period. The five periods, ranging from 5 to 84h, show a clear positive correlation with object mass, a trend which has been reported previously in younger clusters. When comparing with data for F-K stars in the coeval Hyades, we find a dramatic drop in the periods at spectral type K8-M2 (corresponding to 0.4-0.6Ms). A comparison with periods of VLM stars in younger clusters provides a constraint on the spin-down timescale: We find that the exponential rotational braking timescale is clearly longer than 200 Myr, most likely 400-800 Myr. These results are not affected by the small sample size in the rotation periods. Both findings, the steep drop in the period-mass relation and the long spin-down timescale, indicate a substantial change in the angular momentum loss mechanism for very low mass objects, possibly the breakdown of the solar-type (Skumanich) rotational braking. While the physical origin for this behaviour is unclear, we argue that parts of it might be explained by the disappearance of the radiative core and the resulting breakdown of an interface-type dynamo in the VLM regime. Rotational studies in this mass range hold great potential to probe magnetic properties and interior structure of main-sequence stars.
  • The evolution of angular momentum is a key to our understanding of star formation and stellar evolution. The rotational evolution of solar-mass stars is mostly controlled by magnetic interaction with the circumstellar disc and angular momentum loss through stellar winds. Major differences in the internal structure of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs -- they are believed to be fully convective throughout their lives, and thus should not operate a solar-type dynamo -- may lead to major differences in the rotation and activity of these objects. Here, we report on observational studies to understand the rotational evolution of the very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs.
  • We present a comprehensive study of disks around 81 young low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the nearby ~2-Myr-old Chamaeleon I star-forming region. We use mid-infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, supplemented by findings from ground-based high-resolution optical spectroscopy and adaptive optics imaging. We derive disk fractions of 52 (+/-6) % and 58 (+6/-7) % based on 8-micron and 24-micron colour excesses, respectively, consistent with those reported for other clusters of similar age. Within the uncertainties, the disk frequency in our sample of K3-M8 objects in Cha I does not depend on stellar mass. Diskless and disk-bearing objects have similar spatial distributions. There are no obvious transition disks in our sample, implying a rapid timescale for the inner disk clearing process; however, we find two objects with weak excess at 3-8 microns and substantial excess at 24 microns, which may indicate grain growth and dust settling in the inner disk. For a sub-sample of 35 objects with high-resolution spectra, we investigate the connection between accretion signatures and dusty disks: in the vast majority of cases (29/35) the two are well correlated, suggesting that, on average, the timescale for gas dissipation is similar to that for clearing the inner dust disk. The exceptions are six objects for which dust disks appear to persist even though accretion has ceased or dropped below measurable levels. Adaptive optics images of 65 of our targets reveal that 17 have companions at (projected) separations of 10-80 AU. Of the five <20 AU binaries, four lack infrared excess, possibly indicating that a close companion leads to faster disk dispersal. The closest binary with excess is separated by ~20 AU, which sets an upper limit of ~8 AU for the outer disk radius. (abridged)
  • We have carried out a Spitzer survey for brown dwarf (BD) disks in the ~5 Myr old Upper Scorpius (UpSco) star forming region, using IRS spectroscopy from 8 to 12\mu m and MIPS photometry at 24\mu m. Our sample consists of 35 confirmed very low mass members of UpSco. Thirteen objects in this sample show clear excess flux at 24\mu m, explained by dust emission from a circum-sub-stellar disk. Objects without excess emission either have no disks at all or disks with inner opacity holes of at least ~5 AU radii. Our disk frequency of 37\pm 9% is higher than what has been derived previously for K0-M5 stars in the same region (on a 1.8 sigma confidence level), suggesting a mass-dependent disk lifetime in UpSco. The clear distinction between objects with and without disks as well as the lack of transition objects shows that disk dissipation inside 5 AU occurs rapidly, probably on timescales of <~10^5 years. For the objects with disks, most SEDs are uniformly flat with flux levels of a few mJy, well modeled as emission from dusty disks affected by dust settling to the midplane, which also provides indirect evidence for grain growth. The silicate feature around 10\mu m is either absent or weak in our SEDs, arguing for a lack of hot, small dust grains. Compared with younger objects in Taurus, BD disks in UpSco show less flaring. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate that we see disks in an advanced evolutionary state: Dust settling and grain growth are ubiquituous in circum-sub-stellar disks at ages of 5 Myr, arguing for planet forming processes in BD disks. For almost all our targets, results from high-resolution spectroscopy and high-spatial resolution imaging have been published before, thus providing a large sample of BDs for which information about disks, accretion, and binarity is available. (abridged)
  • We report the findings of a comprehensive study of disk accretion and related phenomena in four of the nearest young stellar associations spanning 6-30 million years in age, an epoch that may coincide with the late stages of planet formation. We have obtained ~650 multi-epoch high-resolution optical spectra of 100 low-mass stars that are likely members of the eta Chamaeleontis (~6 Myr), TW Hydrae (~8 Myr), beta Pictoris (~12 Myr) and Tucanae-Horologium (~30 Myr) groups. Our data were collected over 12 nights between 2004 December - 2005 July on the Magellan Clay 6.5m telescope. Based on H$\alpha$ line profiles, along with a variety of other emission lines, we find clear evidence of on-going accretion in three out of 11 eta Cha stars and two out of 32 TW Hydrae members. None of the 57 beta Pic or Tuc-Hor members shows measurable signs of accretion. Together, these results imply significant evolution of the disk accretion process within the first several Myr of a low-mass star's life. While a few disks can continue to accrete for up to ~10 Myr, our findings suggest that disks accreting for beyond that timescale are rather rare. This result provides an indirect constraint on the timescale for gas dissipation in inner disks and, in turn, on gas giant planet formation. All accretors in our sample are slow rotators, whereas non-accretors cover a large range in rotational velocities. This may hint at rotational braking by disks at ages up to ~8 Myr. Our multi-epoch spectra confirm that emission-line variability is common even in somewhat older T Tauri stars, among which accretors tend to show particularly strong variations. Thus, our results indicate that accretion and wind activity undergo significant and sustained variations throughout the lifetime of accretion disks.