• Sensory stimuli can be recognized more rapidly when they are expected. This phenomenon depends on expectation affecting the cortical processing of sensory information. However, virtually nothing is known on the mechanisms responsible for the effects of expectation on sensory networks. Here, we report a novel computational mechanism underlying the expectation-dependent acceleration of coding observed in the gustatory cortex (GC) of alert rats. We use a recurrent spiking network model with a clustered architecture capturing essential features of cortical activity, including the metastable activity observed in GC before and after gustatory stimulation. Relying both on network theory and computer simulations, we propose that expectation exerts its function by modulating the intrinsically generated dynamics preceding taste delivery. Our model, whose predictions are confirmed in the experimental data, demonstrates how the modulation of intrinsic metastable activity can shape sensory coding and mediate cognitive processes such as the expectation of relevant events. Altogether, these results provide a biologically plausible theory of expectation and ascribe a new functional role to intrinsically generated, metastable activity.
  • Single trial analyses of ensemble activity in alert animals demonstrate that cortical circuits dynamics evolve through temporal sequences of metastable states. Metastability has been studied for its potential role in sensory coding, memory and decision-making. Yet, very little is known about the network mechanisms responsible for its genesis. It is often assumed that the onset of state sequences is triggered by an external stimulus. Here we show that state sequences can be observed also in the absence of overt sensory stimulation. Analysis of multielectrode recordings from the gustatory cortex of alert rats revealed ongoing sequences of states, where single neurons spontaneously attain several firing rates across different states. This single neuron multi-stability represents a challenge to existing spiking network models, where typically each neuron is at most bi-stable. We present a recurrent spiking network model that accounts for both the spontaneous generation of state sequences and the multi-stability in single neuron firing rates. Each state results from the activation of neural clusters with potentiated intra-cluster connections, with the firing rate in each cluster depending on the number of active clusters. Simulations show that the models ensemble activity hops among the different states, reproducing the ongoing dynamics observed in the data. When probed with external stimuli, the model predicts the quenching of single neuron multi-stability into bi-stability and the reduction of trial-by-trial variability. Both predictions were confirmed in the data. Altogether, these results provide a theoretical framework that captures both ongoing and evoked network dynamics in a single mechanistic model.
  • The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during period of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, the model predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and pair-wise correlations in spiking network models.