• Young supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a unique perspective on supernova (SN) progenitors and connect the late evolution of SNe with the onset of the SNR phase. Here we study SN 1885A and G1.9+0.3, the most recent thermonuclear SNe in the Local Group (with ages $\sim 100$ years) with radio data, which provides a sensitive probe of the SN environment and energetics. We reduce and co-add 4-8 GHz observations from Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to produce the deepest radio image of the M31 central region (RMS noise of 1.3 $\mu$Jy/beam at 6.2 GHz). We detect some diffuse emission near SN 1885A at 2.6 $\sigma$, but the association with SN 1885A is uncertain because diffuse radio emission pervades the M31 central region. The VLA upper limit and HST measurements yield an ambient density, $n_0 < 0.04$ cm$^{-3}$ ($\pm$ 0.03 cm$^{-3}$ due to systematics) for SN 1885A, and kinetic energies, $E_k \sim (1.3-1.7) \times 10^{51}$ ergs for ejecta masses of $1-1.4$ M$_{\odot}$. For the same ejecta mass range, VLA observations of G1.9+0.3 yield $n_0 = 0.18$ cm$^{-3}$, and $E_k = (1-1.3) \times 10^{51}$ ergs. We argue that a sub-Chandrasekhar explosion model may be likely for SN 1885A, in agreement with X-ray studies, but in tension with models for the HST absorption spectra. The analysis of G1.9+0.3 is consistent with both Chandrasekhar and sub-Chandrasekhar SN Ia models, but rules out Type Iax explosions.
  • Searches for circumstellar material around Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are one of the most powerful tests of the nature of SN Ia progenitors, and radio observations provide a particularly sensitive probe of this material. Here we report radio observations for SNe Ia and their lower-luminosity thermonuclear cousins. We present the largest, most sensitive, and spectroscopically diverse study of prompt (delta t <~ 1 yr) radio observations of 85 thermonuclear SNe, including 25 obtained by our team with the unprecedented depth of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. With these observations, SN 2012cg joins SN 2011fe and SN 2014J as a SN Ia with remarkably deep radio limits and excellent temporal coverage (six epochs, spanning 5--216 days after explosion, yielding Mdot/v_w <~ 5 x 10^-9 M_sun/yr / (100 km/s), assuming epsilon_B = 0.1 and epsilon_e = 0.1). All observations yield non-detections, placing strong constraints on the presence of circumstellar material. We present analytical models for the temporal and spectral evolution of prompt radio emission from thermonuclear SNe as expected from interaction with either wind-stratified or uniform density media. These models allow us to constrain the progenitor mass loss rates, with limits ranging from Mdot <~ 10^-9--10^-4 M_sun/yr, assuming a wind velocity v_w=100 km/s. We compare our radio constraints with measurements of Galactic symbiotic binaries to conclude that <~10% of thermonuclear SNe have red giant companions.
  • We present all X-ray and radio observations of the Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl. The X-ray observations cover a period up to day 1500 with Chandra, XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Swift-XRT. The Chandra observations after 2012 June, the XMM-Newton observation in 2013 November, and most of the Swift-XRT observations until 2014 December are presented for the first time. All the spectra can be fitted by an absorbed hot thermal model except for \chandra spectra on 2011 October and 2012 June when an additional component is needed. Although the origin of this component is uncertain, it is spatially coincident with the supernova and occurs when there are changes to the supernova spectrum in the energy range close to that of the extra component, indicating that the emission is related to the supernova. The X-ray light curve shows an initial plateau followed by a steep drop starting at day $\sim 300$. We attribute the drop to a decrease in the circumstellar density. The column density to the X-ray emission drops rapidly with time, showing that the absorption is in the vicinity of the supernova. We also present Very Large Array radio observations of SN 2010jl. Radio emission was detected from \sn from day 570 onwards. The radio light curves and spectra suggest that the radio luminosity was close to its maximum at the first detection. The velocity of the shocked ejecta derived assuming synchrotron self absorption is much less than that estimated from the optical and X-ray observations, suggesting that free-free absorption dominates.
  • We revisit the exquisite archival radio data for the Type Ic supernova SN 1994I and present a revised model for the SN radio emission and a pilot study that aims to constrain the rate of C-band radio transients within the face-on host galaxy, M51 (NGC 5194). We find that the temporal and spectral evolution of the SN\,1994I radio emission are well fit by a synchrotron self-absorption model and use this to estimate physical parameters. We compute a pre-explosion mass loss rate of $\dot{M}=3.0 \times 10^{-5} M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ for the progenitor, consistent with those observed from galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. Our model makes different assumptions for the dynamical model for the shockwave interaction than the model previously published by \cite{weil11}, but our $\dot{M}$ is consistent with theirs to within errors and assumptions. Drawing from a subset of the archival radio observations from the Very Large Array collected for the monitoring of SN\,1994I, we conduct a pilot study to search for previously-unidentified transients. Data were primarily taken at a frequency of 4.9 GHz and are logarithmic in cadence, enabling sensitivity to transients with variability timescales ranging from days to months. We find no new transient detections in 31 epochs of data, allowing us to place a $2\sigma$ upper limit of 17 deg$^{-2}$ for the source density of radio transients above 0.5 mJy ($L\gtrsim4\times10^{25}$ erg s$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1}$ at the distance of M51). This study highlights the feasibility of utilizing archival high-cadence radio studies of supernova host galaxies to place constraints on the radio transient rate as a function of luminosity in the local Universe.
  • We present radio and X-ray observations of the nearby Type IIb Supernova 2013df in NGC4414 from 10 to 250 days after the explosion. The radio emission showed a peculiar soft-to-hard spectral evolution. We present a model in which inverse Compton cooling of synchrotron emitting electrons can account for the observed spectral and light curve evolution. A significant mass loss rate, $\dot{M} \approx 8 \times 10^{-5}\,\rm M_{\odot}/yr$ for a wind velocity of 10 km/s, is estimated from the detailed modeling of radio and X-ray emission, which are primarily due to synchrotron and bremsstrahlung, respectively. We show that SN 2013df is similar to SN 1993J in various ways. The shock wave speed of SN 2013df was found to be average among the radio supernovae; $v_{sh}/c \sim 0.07$. We did not find any significant deviation from smooth decline in the light curve of SN 2013df. One of the main results of our self-consistent multiband modeling is the significant deviation from energy equipartition between magnetic fields and relativistic electrons behind the shock. We estimate $\epsilon_{e} = 200 \epsilon_{B}$. In general for Type IIb SNe, we find that the presence of bright optical cooling envelope emission is linked with free-free radio absorption and bright thermal X-ray emission. This finding suggests that more extended progenitors, similar to that of SN 2013df, suffer from substantial mass loss in the years before the supernova.
  • Supernovae provide a backdrop from which we can probe the end state of stellar evolution in the final years before the progenitor star explodes. As the shock from the supernova expands, the timespan of mass loss history we are able to probe also extends, providing insight to rapid time-scale processes that govern the end state of massive stars. While supernovae transition into remnants on timescales of decades to centuries, observations of this phase are currently limited. Here we present observations of SN 1970G, serendipitously observed during the monitoring campaign of SN 2011fe that shares the same host galaxy. Utilizing the new Jansky Very Large Array upgrade and a deep X-ray exposure taken by the Chandra Space Telescope, we are able to recover this middle-aged supernova and distinctly resolve it from the HII cloud with which it is associated. We find that the flux density of SN 1970G has changed significantly since it was last observed - the X-ray luminosity has increased by a factor of ~3, while we observe a significantly lower radio flux of only 27.5 micro-Jy at 6.75 GHz, a level only detectable through the upgrades now in operation at the Jansky Very Large Array. These changes suggest that SN 1970G has entered a new stage of evolution towards a supernova remnant, and we may be detecting the turn-on of the pulsar wind nebula. Deep radio observations of additional middle-aged supernovae with the improved radio facilities will provide a statistical census of the delicate transition period between supernova and remnant.
  • We report spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh obtained between 4 and 34 days after the estimated date of explosion (May 31.5 UT). The data cover a wide wavelength range from 2,000 Angstroms in the UV to 2.4 microns in the NIR. Optical spectra provide line profiles and velocity measurements of HI, HeI, CaII and FeII that trace the composition and kinematics of the SN. NIR spectra show that helium is present in the atmosphere as early as 11 days after the explosion. A UV spectrum obtained with the STIS reveals that the UV flux for SN 2011dh is low compared to other SN IIb. The HI and HeI velocities in SN 2011dh are separated by about 4,000 km/s at all phases. We estimate that the H-shell of SN 2011dh is about 8 times less massive than the shell of SN 1993J and about 3 times more massive than the shell of SN 2008ax. Light curves (LC) for twelve passbands are presented. The maximum bolometric luminosity of $1.8 \pm 0.2 \times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ occurred about 22 days after the explosion. NIR emission provides more than 30% of the total bolometric flux at the beginning of our observations and increases to nearly 50% of the total by day 34. The UV produces 16% of the total flux on day 4, 5% on day 9 and 1% on day 34. We compare the bolometric light curves of SN 2011dh, SN 2008ax and SN 1993J. The LC are very different for the first twelve days after the explosions but all three SN IIb display similar peak luminosities, times of peak, decline rates and colors after maximum. This suggests that the progenitors of these SN IIb may have had similar compositions and masses but they exploded inside hydrogen shells that that have a wide range of masses. The detailed observations presented here will help evaluate theoretical models for this supernova and lead to a better understanding of SN IIb.
  • High-dispersion observations of the Na I D 5890, 5896 and K I 7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to "Blueshifted" profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. (2011). This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.
  • We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN\, 2012au, the energetic radio luminous supernova of type Ib that may be a link between subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from shock heated circum-burst medium that has a wind density profile ($\rho \propto r^{-2}$). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave $v \approx 0.2\,c$ and a radius of $r \approx 1.4 \times 10^{16} \rm cm$ at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a constant wind velocity of 1000 km/s we determine the constant mass loss rate of the progenitor to be $\dot{M} = 3.6 \times 10^{-6} \rm M_{\odot} yr^{-1}$, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio emitting material to be $E \approx 10^{47} \rm erg$, which is intermediate to SN\,1998bw and SN\,2002ap. Evolution of the radio light curves of SN\,2012au is consistent with interaction with a smoothly distributed circum-burst medium and absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to $r \approx 10^{17} \rm cm$ from the supernova site. Based on this we conclude that the evolution of the SN\,2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet during the final years preceding explosion. We find that the bright radio emission from SN2012au was not dissimilar from other core collapse supernovae despite it's extraordinary optical properties. We speculate that it was the nature of the explosion that led to the unusual demise of the SN2012au progenitor star.
  • There is a well known correlation between the mass and metallicity of star-forming galaxies. Because mass is correlated with luminosity, this relation is often exploited, when spectroscopy is not available, to estimate galaxy metallicities based on single band photometry. However, we show that galaxy color is typically more effective than luminosity as a predictor of metallicity. This is a consequence of the correlation between color and the galaxy mass-to-light ratio and the recently discovered correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and residuals from the mass-metallicity relation. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy of 180,000 nearby galaxies, we derive "LZC relations," empirical relations between metallicity (in seven common strong line diagnostics), luminosity, and color (in ten filter pairs and four methods of photometry). We show that these relations allow photometric metallicity estimates, based on luminosity and a single optical color, that are 50% more precise than those made based on luminosity alone; galaxy metallicity can be estimated to within 0.05 - 0.1 dex of the spectroscopically-derived value depending on the metallicity diagnostic used. Including color information in metallicity estimates also reduces systematic biases for populations skewed toward high or low SFR environments, as we illustrate using the host galaxy of the supernova SN 2010ay. This new tool will lend more statistical power to studies of galaxy populations, such as supernova and gamma-ray burst (GRB) host environments, in ongoing and future wide field imaging surveys.
  • GRB 120422A is a nearby (z = 0.283) long-duration GRB (LGRB) detected by Swift with E(gamma,iso) ~ 4.5\times1049 erg. It is also associated with the spectroscopically-confirmed broad-lined Type Ic SN 2012bz. These properties establish GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz as the sixth and newest member of the class of subluminous GRB/SNe. Observations also show that GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz occurred at an unusually large offset (~8 kpc) from the host galaxy nucleus, setting it apart from other nearby LGRBs and leading to speculation that the host environment may have undergone prior interaction activity. Here we present spectroscopic observations using the 6.5m Magellan telescope at Las Campanas. We extract spectra at three specific locations within the GRB/SN host galaxy, including the host nucleus, the explosion site, and the "bridge" of diffuse emission connecting these two regions. We measure a metallicity of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.3 +/- 0.1 and a star formation rate per unit area of 0.08 Mo/yr/kpc^2 at the host nucleus. At the GRB/SN explosion site we measure a comparable metallicity of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.2 +/- 0.1, but find a much lower star formation rate per unit area of 0.01 M/yr/kpc^2. We also compare the host galaxy of this event to the hosts other LGRBs, including samples of subluminous LGRBs and cosmological LGRBs, and find no systematic metallicity difference between the environments of these different subtypes.
  • We report four years of radio and X-ray monitoring of the Type IIn supernova SN 2006jd at radio wavelengths with the Very Large Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array; at X-ray wavelengths with {\em Chandra}, {\em XMM-Newton} and {\em Swift}-XRT. We assume that the radio and X-ray emitting particles are produced by shock interaction with a dense circumstellar medium. The radio emission shows an initial rise that can be attributed to free-free absorption by cool gas mixed into the nonthermal emitting region; external free-free absorption is disfavored because of the shape of the rising light curves and the low gas column density inferred along the line of sight to the emission region. The X-ray luminosity implies a preshock circumstellar density $\sim 10^6$ cm$^{-3}$ at a radius $r\sim 2\times 10^{16}$ cm, but the column density inferred from the photoabsorption of X-rays along the line of sight suggests a significantly lower density. The implication may be an asymmetry in the interaction. The X-ray spectrum shows Fe line emission at 6.9 keV that is stronger than is expected for the conditions in the X-ray emitting gas. We suggest that cool gas mixed into the hot gas plays a role in the line emission. Our radio and X-ray data both suggest the density profile is flatter than $r^{-2}$ because of the slow evolution of the unabsorbed emission.
  • We present R-Band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.
  • We report the discovery and detailed monitoring of X-ray emission associated with the Type IIb SN 2011dh using data from the Swift and Chandra satellites, placing it among the best studied X-ray supernovae to date. We further present millimeter and radio data obtained with the SMA, CARMA, and EVLA during the first three weeks after explosion. Combining these observations with early optical photometry, we show that the panchromatic dataset is well-described by non-thermal synchrotron emission (radio/mm) with inverse Compton scattering (X-ray) of a thermal population of optical photons. In this scenario, the shock partition fractions deviate from equipartition by a factor, (e_e/e_B) ~ 30. We derive the properties of the shockwave and the circumstellar environment and find a shock velocity, v~0.1c, and a progenitor mass loss rate of ~6e-5 M_sun/yr. These properties are consistent with the sub-class of Type IIb SNe characterized by compact progenitors (Type cIIb) and dissimilar from those with extended progenitors (Type eIIb). Furthermore, we consider the early optical emission in the context of a cooling envelope model to estimate a progenitor radius of ~1e+11 cm, in line with the expectations for a Type cIIb SN. Together, these diagnostics are difficult to reconcile with the extended radius of the putative yellow supergiant progenitor star identified in archival HST observations, unless the stellar density profile is unusual. Finally, we searched for the high energy shock breakout pulse using X-ray and gamma-ray observations obtained during the purported explosion date range. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor, we estimate that the breakout pulse was detectable with current instruments but likely missed due to their limited temporal/spatial coverage. [Abridged]
  • We present extensive radio observations of the nearby Type Ibc supernovae 2004cc, 2004dk, and 2004gq spanning 8-1900 days after explosion. Using a dynamical model developed for synchrotron emission from a slightly decelerated shockwave, we estimate the velocity and energy of the fastest ejecta and the density profile of the circumstellar medium. The shockwaves of all three supernovae are characterized by non-relativistic velocities of v ~ (0.1-25)c and associated energies of E ~ (2-10) * 1e47 erg, in line with the expectations for a typical homologous explosion. Smooth circumstellar density profiles are indicated by the early radio data and we estimate the progenitor mass loss rates to be ~ (0.6-13) * 1e-5 M_sun/yr (wind velocity 10^3 km/s). These estimates approach the saturation limit (~1e-4 M_sun/yr) for line-driven winds from Wolf-Rayet stars, the favored progenitors of SNe Ibc including those associated with long-duration GRBs. Intriguingly, at later epochs all three supernovae show evidence for abrupt radio variability that we attribute to large density modulations (factor of ~3-6) at circumstellar radii of r ~ (1-50) * 1e16 cm. If due to variable mass loss, these modulations are associated with progenitor activity on a timescale of ~ 10-100 years before explosion. We consider these results in the context of variable mass loss mechanisms including wind clumping, metallicity-independent continuum-driven ejections, and binary-induced modulations. It may also be possible that the SN shockwaves are dynamically interacting with wind termination shocks, however, this requires the environment to be highly pressurized and/or the progenitor to be rapidly rotating prior to explosion. The proximity of the density modulations to the explosion sites may suggest a synchronization between unusual progenitor mass loss and the SN explosion, reminiscent of Type IIn supernovae. [ABRIDGED]
  • We report unique EVLA observations of SN 2011fe representing the most sensitive radio study of a Type Ia supernova to date. Our data place direct constraints on the density of the surrounding medium at radii ~10^15-10^16 cm, implying an upper limit on the mass loss rate from the progenitor system of Mdot <~ 6 x 10^-10 Msol/yr (assuming a wind speed of 100 km/s), or expansion into a uniform medium with density n_CSM <~ 6 cm^-3. Drawing from the observed properties of non-conservative mass transfer among accreting white dwarfs, we use these limits on the density of the immediate environs to exclude a phase space of possible progenitors systems for SN 2011fe. We rule out a symbiotic progenitor system and also a system characterized by high accretion rate onto the white dwarf that is expected to give rise to optically-thick accretion winds. Assuming that a small fraction, 1%, of the mass accreted is lost from the progenitor system, we also eliminate much of the potential progenitor parameter space for white dwarfs hosting recurrent novae or undergoing stable nuclear burning. Therefore, we rule out the most popular single degenerate progenitor models for SN 2011fe, leaving a limited phase space inhabited by some double degenerate systems and exotic progenitor scenarios.
  • We report two epochs of Chandra-ACIS X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the nearby bright Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl, taken around 2 months and then a year after the explosion. The majority of the X-ray emission in both the spectra is characterized by a high temperature ($\ga 10$ keV) and is likely to be from the forward shocked region resulting from circumstellar interaction. The absorption column density in the first spectrum is high, ~ 10^{24} cm^{-2}, more than 3 orders of magnitude higher than the Galactic absorption column, and we attribute it to absorption by circumstellar matter. In the second epoch observation, the column density has decreased by a factor of 3, as expected for shock propagation in the circumstellar medium. The unabsorbed 0.2-10 keV luminosity at both epochs is ~7 x 10^{41} erg/s. The 6.4 keV Fe line clearly present in the first spectrum is not detected in the second spectrum. The strength of the fluorescent line is roughly that expected for the column density of circumstellar gas, provided the Fe is not highly ionized. There is also evidence for an absorbed power law component in both the spectra, which we attribute to a background ultraluminous X-ray source.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • Recent observations suggest that Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) may exhibit late-time (>100 days) infrared (IR) emission from warm dust more than other types of core-collapse SNe. Mid-IR observations, which span the peak of the thermal spectral energy distribution, provide useful constraints on the properties of the dust and, ultimately, the circumstellar environment, explosion mechanism, and progenitor system. Due to the low SN IIn rate (<10% of all core-collapse SNe), few IR observations exist for this subclass. The handful of isolated studies, however, show late-time IR emission from warm dust that, in some cases, extends for five or six years post-discovery. While previous Spitzer/IRAC surveys have searched for dust in SNe, none have targeted the Type IIn subclass. This article presents results from a warm Spitzer/IRAC survey of the positions of all 68 known SNe IIn within a distance of 250 Mpc between 1999 and 2008 that have remained unobserved by Spitzer more than 100 days post-discovery. The detection of late-time emission from ten targets (~15%) nearly doubles the database of existing mid-IR observations of SNe IIn. Although optical spectra show evidence for new dust formation in some cases, the data show that in most cases the likely origin of the mid-IR emission is pre-existing dust, which is continuously heated by optical emission generated by ongoing circumstellar interaction between the forward shock and circumstellar medium. Furthermore, an emerging trend suggests that these SNe decline at ~1000--2000 days post-discovery once the forward shock overruns the dust shell. The mass-loss rates associated with these dust shells are consistent with luminous blue variable (LBV) progenitors.
  • The recent long-duration GRB 100316D, associated with supernova SN 2010bh and detected by Swift, is one of the nearest GRB-SNe ever observed (z = 0.059). This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the explosion environment on ~kpc scale in relation to the host galaxy complex. Here we present spatially-resolved spectrophotometry of the host galaxy, focusing on both the explosion site and the brightest star-forming regions. Using these data, we extract the spatial profiles of the relevant emission features (Halpha, Hbeta, [OIII] 5007A, and [NII] 6584A), and use these profiles to examine variations in metallicity and star formation rate as a function of position in the host galaxy. We conclude that GRB 100316D/SN2010bh occurred in a low-metallicity host galaxy, and that the GRB-SN explosion site corresponds to the region with the lowest metallicity and highest star formation rate sampled by our observations.
  • We compare the redshifts, host galaxy metallicities, and isotropic (E_gamma,iso) and beaming-corrected (E_gamma) gamma-ray energy release of 16 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) at z < 1. From this comparison, we find no statistically significant correlation between host metallicity and redshift, E_gamma,iso, or E_gamma. These results are at odds with previous theoretical and observational predictions of an inverse correlation between gamma-ray energy release and host metallicity, as well as the standard predictions of metallicity-driven wind effects in stellar evolutionary models. We consider the implications that these results have for LGRB progenitor scenarios, and discuss our current understanding of the role that metallicity plays in the production of LGRBs.
  • We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of the nearby Type Ic SN 2007gr in NGC 1058 obtained with the Very Large Array and the Chandra X-ray Observatory and spanning 5 to 150 days after explosion. Through our detailed modeling of these data, we estimate the properties of the blastwave and the circumstellar environment. We find evidence for a freely-expanding and non-relativistic explosion with an average blastwave velocity, v~0.2c, and a total internal energy for the radio emitting material of E ~ 2 x 10^46 erg assuming equipartition of energy between electrons and magnetic fields (epsilon_e=epsilon_B=0.1). The temporal and spectral evolution of the radio emission points to a stellar wind-blown environment shaped by a steady progenitor mass loss rate of Mdot ~ 6 x 10^-7 solar masses per year (wind velocity, v_w=10^3 km/s). These parameters are fully consistent with those inferred for other SNe Ibc and are in line with the expectations for an ordinary, homologous SN explosion. Our results are at odds with those of Paragi et al. (2010) who recently reported evidence for a relativistic blastwave in SN 2007gr based on their claim that the radio emission was resolved away in a low signal-to-noise Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observation. Here we show that the exotic physical scenarios required to explain the claimed relativistic velocity -- extreme departures from equipartition and/or a highly collimated outflow -- are excluded by our detailed Very Large Array radio observations. Moreover, we present an independent analysis of the VLBI data and propose that a modest loss of phase coherence provides a more natural explanation for the apparent flux density loss which is evident on both short and long baselines. We conclude that SN 2007gr is an ordinary Type Ibc supernova.
  • We present the spectroscopic discovery of a broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN 2010bh) associated with the nearby long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100316D. At z = 0.0593, this is the third-nearest GRB-SN. Nightly optical spectra obtained with the Magellan telescopes during the first week after explosion reveal the gradual emergence of very broad spectral features superposed on a blue continuum. The supernova features are typical of broad-lined SNe Ic and are generally consistent with previous supernovae associated with low-redshift GRBs. However, the inferred velocities of SN 2010bh at 21 days after explosion are a factor of ~2 times larger than those of the prototypical SN 1998bw at similar epochs, with v ~ 26,000 km/s, indicating a larger explosion energy or a different ejecta structure. A near-infrared spectrum taken 13.8 days after explosion shows no strong evidence for He I at 1.083 microns, implying that the progenitor was largely stripped of its helium envelope. The host galaxy is of low luminosity (M_R ~ -18.5 mag) and low metallicity (Z < 0.4 Z_solar), similar to the hosts of other low-redshift GRB-SNe.
  • Despite both being outbursts of luminous blue variables (LBVs), SN 2009ip and UGC 2773 OT2009-1 have very different progenitors, spectra, circumstellar environments, and possibly physical mechanisms that generated the outbursts. From pre-eruption HST images, we determine that SN 2009ip and UGC 2773 OT2009-1 have initial masses of >60 and >25 M_sun, respectively. Optical spectroscopy shows that at peak SN 2009ip had a 10,000 K photosphere and its spectrum was dominated by narrow H Balmer emission, similar to classical LBV giant outbursts, also known as "supernova impostors." The spectra of UGC 2773 OT2009-1, which also have narrow H alpha emission, are dominated by a forest of absorption lines, similar to an F-type supergiant. Blueshifted absorption lines corresponding to ejecta at a velocity of 2000 - 7000 km/s are present in later spectra of SN 2009ip -- an unprecedented observation for LBV outbursts, indicating that the event was the result of a supersonic explosion, rather than a subsonic outburst. The velocity of the absorption lines increases between two epochs, suggesting that there were two explosions in rapid succession. A rapid fading and rebrightening event concurrent with the onset of the high-velocity absorption lines is consistent with the double-explosion model. A near-infrared excess is present in the spectra and photometry of UGC 2773 OT2009-1 that is consistent with ~2100 K dust emission. We compare the properties of these two events and place them in the context of other known massive star outbursts such as eta Car, NGC 300 OT2008-1, and SN 2008S. This qualitative analysis suggests that massive star outbursts have many physical differences which can manifest as the different observables seen in these two interesting objects.
  • The classic example of a Type IIb supernova is SN 1993J, which had a cool extended progenitor surrounded by a dense wind. There is evidence for another category of Type IIb supernova which has a more compact progenitor with a lower density, probably fast, wind. Distinguishing features of the compact category are: weak optical emission from the shock heated envelope at early times; nonexistent or very weak H emission in the late nebular phase; rapidly evolving radio emission; rapid expansion of the radio shell; and expected nonthermal as opposed to thermal X-ray emission. Type IIb supernovae that have one or more of these features include SNe 1996cb, 2001ig, 2003bg, 2008ax, and 2008bo. All of these with sufficient radio data (the last four) show evidence for presupernova wind variability. We estimate a progenitor envelope radius ~1e11 cm for SN 2008ax, a value consistent with a compact Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Supernovae in the SN 1993J extended category include SN 2001gd and probably the Cas A supernova. We suggest that the compact Type IIb events be designated Type cIIb and the extended ones Type eIIb. The H envelope mass dividing these categories is ~0.1 Msun.