• Cosmic acceleration is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades. Testing and distinguishing among possible explanations requires cosmological measurements of extremely high precision probing the full history of cosmic expansion and structure growth and, ideally, compare and contrast matter and relativistic tracers of the gravity potential. This program is one of the defining objectives of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), as set forth in the New Worlds, New Horizons report (NWNH) in 2010. The WFIRST mission has the ability to improve these measurements by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to the current state of the art, while simultaneously extending their redshift grasp, greatly improving control of systematic effects, and taking a unified approach to multiple probes that provide complementary physical information and cross-checks of cosmological results. We describe in this annual report the activities of the Science Investigation Team (SIT) "Cosmology with the High Latitude Survey (HLS)" during the year 2017. This team was selected by NASA in December 2015 in order to address the stringent challenges of the WFIRST dark energy (DE) program through the Project's formulation phase. This SIT has elected to jointly address Galaxy Redshift Survey, Weak Lensing and Cluster Growth and thus fully embrace the fact that the imaging and spectroscopic elements of the HLS will be realized as an integrated observing program, and they jointly impose requirements on performance and operations. WFIRST is designed to be able to deliver a definitive result on the origin of cosmic acceleration. It is not optimized for Figure of Merit sensitivity but for control of systematic uncertainties and for having multiple techniques each with multiple cross-checks. Our SIT work focuses on understanding the potential systematics in the WFIRST DE measurements.
  • Knowledge of the number density of H$\alpha$ emitting galaxies is vital for assessing the scientific impact of the Euclid and WFIRST missions. In this work we present predictions from a galaxy formation model, Galacticus, for the cumulative number counts of H$\alpha$-emitting galaxies. We couple Galacticus to three different dust attenuation methods and examine the counts using each method. A $\chi^2$ minimisation approach is used to compare the model predictions to observed galaxy counts and calibrate the dust parameters. We find that weak dust attenuation is required for the Galacticus counts to be broadly consistent with the observations, though the optimum dust parameters return large values for $\chi^2$, suggesting that further calibration of Galacticus is necessary. The model predictions are also consistent with observed estimates for the optical depth and the H$\alpha$ luminosity function. Finally we present forecasts for the redshift distributions and number counts for two Euclid-like and one WFIRST-like survey. For a Euclid-like survey with redshift range $0.9\leqslant z\leqslant 1.8$ and H$\alpha+{\rm [NII]}$ blended flux limit of $2\times 10^{-16}{\rm erg}\,{\rm s}^{-1}\,{\rm cm}^{-2}$ we predict a number density between 3900--4800 galaxies per square degree. For a WFIRST-like survey with redshift range $1\leqslant z\leqslant 2$ and blended flux limit of $1\times 10^{-16}{\rm erg}\,{\rm s}^{-1}\,{\rm cm}^{-2}$ we predict a number density between 10400--15200 galaxies per square degree.
  • The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the nonlinear evolution of the cosmic web. As nonlinear clustering to date has only been described by numerical $N$-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work we describe the change of the matter covariance and of the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from nonlinear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to $\ell\leq 1300$. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimising interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.
  • To accomplish correct Bayesian inference from weak lensing shear data requires a complete statistical description of the data. The natural framework to do this is a Bayesian Hierarchical Model, which divides the chain of reasoning into component steps. Starting with a catalogue of shear estimates in tomographic bins, we build a model that allows us to sample simultaneously from the the underlying tomographic shear fields and the relevant power spectra (E-mode, B-mode, and E-B, for auto- and cross-power spectra). The procedure deals easily with masked data and intrinsic alignments. Using Gibbs sampling and messenger fields, we show with simulated data that the large (over 67000-)dimensional parameter space can be efficiently sampled and the full joint posterior probability density function for the parameters can feasibly be obtained. The method correctly recovers the underlying shear fields and all of the power spectra, including at levels well below the shot noise.
  • We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models \emph{a posteriori} without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear $E$-mode, $B$-mode and $EB$-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both $E$- and $B$-modes.
  • The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.
  • Galaxy shapes are not randomly oriented, rather they are statistically aligned in a way that can depend on formation environment, history and galaxy type. Studying the alignment of galaxies can therefore deliver important information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution as well as the growth of structure in the Universe. In this review paper we summarise key measurements of galaxy alignments, divided by galaxy type, scale and environment. We also cover the statistics and formalism necessary to understand the observations in the literature. With the emergence of weak gravitational lensing as a precision probe of cosmology, galaxy alignments have taken on an added importance because they can mimic cosmic shear, the effect of gravitational lensing by large-scale structure on observed galaxy shapes. This makes galaxy alignments, commonly referred to as intrinsic alignments, an important systematic effect in weak lensing studies. We quantify the impact of intrinsic alignments on cosmic shear surveys and finish by reviewing practical mitigation techniques which attempt to remove contamination by intrinsic alignments.
  • The shapes of galaxies are not randomly oriented on the sky. During the galaxy formation and evolution process, environment has a strong influence, as tidal gravitational fields in the large-scale structure tend to align nearby galaxies. Additionally, events such as galaxy mergers affect the relative alignments of both the shapes and angular momenta of galaxies throughout their history. These "intrinsic galaxy alignments" are known to exist, but are still poorly understood. This review will offer a pedagogical introduction to the current theories that describe intrinsic galaxy alignments, including the apparent difference in intrinsic alignment between early- and late-type galaxies and the latest efforts to model them analytically. It will then describe the ongoing efforts to simulate intrinsic alignments using both N-body and hydrodynamic simulations. Due to the relative youth of this field, there is still much to be done to understand intrinsic galaxy alignments and this review summarises the current state of the field, providing a solid basis for future work.
  • The abundance of peaks in weak gravitational lensing maps is a potentially powerful cosmological tool, complementary to measurements of the shear power spectrum. We study peaks detected directly in shear maps, rather than convergence maps, an approach that has the advantage of working directly with the observable quantity, the galaxy ellipticity catalog. Using large numbers of numerical simulations to accurately predict the abundance of peaks and their covariance, we quantify the cosmological constraints attainable by a large-area survey similar to that expected from the Euclid mission, focussing on the density parameter, {\Omega}m, and on the power spectrum normalization, {\sigma}8, for illustration. We present a tomographic peak counting method that improves the conditional (marginal) constraints by a factor 1.2 (2) over those from a two-dimensional (i.e., non-tomographic) peak-count analysis. We find that peak statistics provide constraints an order of magnitude less accurate than those from the cluster sample in the ideal situation of a perfectly known observable-mass relation; however, when the scaling relation is not known a priori, the shear-peak constraints are twice as strong and orthogonal to the cluster constraints, highlighting the value of using both clusters and shear-peak statistics.
  • We compare the shapes and intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II cosmological hydrodynamic simulation (MBII) to those in a dark matter-only (DMO) simulation performed with the same volume (100$h^{-1}$Mpc)$^{3}$, cosmological parameters, and initial conditions. Understanding the impact of baryonic physics on galaxy shapes and alignments and their relation to the dark matter distribution should prove useful to map the intrinsic alignments of galaxies from hydrodynamic to dark matter-only simulations. We find that dark matter subhalos are typically rounder in MBII, and the shapes of stellar matter in low mass galaxies are more misaligned with the shapes of the dark matter of the corresponding subhalos in the DMO simulation. At $z=0.06$, the fractional difference in the mean misalignment angle between MBII and DMO simulations varies from $\sim 28 \% - 12 \%$ in the mass range $10^{10.8} - 6.0 \times 10^{14} h^{-1}M_{\odot}$. We study the dark matter halo shapes and alignments as a function of radius, and find that while galaxies in MBII are more aligned with the inner parts of their dark matter subhalos, there is no radial trend in their alignments with the corresponding subhalo in the DMO simulation. This result highlights the importance of baryonic physics in determining the alignment of the galaxy with respect to the inner parts of the halo. Finally, we compare the ellipticity-direction (ED) correlation for galaxies to that for dark matter halos, finding that it is suppressed on all scales by stellar-dark matter misalignment. In the projected shape-density correlation ($w_{\delta+}$), which includes ellipticity weighting, this effect is partially canceled by the higher mean ellipticities of the stellar component, but differences of order $30-40\%$ remain on scales $> 1$ Mpc over a range of subhalo masses, with scale-dependent effects below $1$ Mpc.
  • In the theory of structure formation, galaxies are biased tracers of the underlying matter density field. The statistical relation between galaxy and matter density field is commonly referred as galaxy bias. In this paper, we test the linear bias model with weak-lensing and galaxy clustering measurements in the 2 square degrees COSMOS field (Scoville et al. 2007). We estimate the bias of galaxies between redshifts z=0.2 and z=1, and over correlation scales between R=0.2 h^-1 Mpc and R=15 h^-1 Mpc. We focus on three galaxy samples, selected in flux (simultaneous cuts I_814W < 26.5 and K_s < 24), and in stellar-mass (10^9 < M_* < 10^10 h^-2 Msun and 10^10 < M^*< 10^11 h^-2 Msun). At scales R > 2 h^-1 Mpc, our measurements support a model of bias increasing with redshift. The Tinker et al. (2010) fitting function provides a good fit to the data. We find the best fit mass of the galaxy halos to be log(M_200 h^-1 Msun) = 11.7^+0.6_-1.3 and log(M_200 h^-1 Msun) = 12.4^+0.2_-2.9 respectively for the low and high stellar-mass samples. In the halo model framework, bias is scale-dependent with a change of slope at the transition scale between the one and the two halo terms. We detect a scale-dependence of bias with a turn-down at scale R=2.3\pm1.5 h^-1 Mpc, in agreement with previous galaxy clustering studies. We find no significant amount of stochasticity, suggesting that a linear bias model is sufficient to describe our data. We use N-body simulations to quantify both the amount of cosmic variance and systematic errors in the measurement.
  • GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) is a public image analysis challenge aimed at the development of algorithms to analyze astronomical images. Specifically, the challenge is to measure varying image distortions in the presence of a variable convolution kernel, pixelization and noise. This is the second in a series of challenges set to the astronomy, computer science and statistics communities, providing a structured environment in which methods can be improved and tested in preparation for planned astronomical surveys. GREAT10 extends upon previous work by introducing variable fields into the challenge. The "Galaxy Challenge" involves the precise measurement of galaxy shape distortions, quantified locally by two parameters called shear, in the presence of a known convolution kernel. Crucially, the convolution kernel and the simulated gravitational lensing shape distortion both now vary as a function of position within the images, as is the case for real data. In addition, we introduce the "Star Challenge" that concerns the reconstruction of a variable convolution kernel, similar to that in a typical astronomical observation. This document details the GREAT10 Challenge for potential participants. Continually updated information is also available from http://www.greatchallenges.info.
  • We analyse for the first time the radial abundance gradients of the disc stars of a disc galaxy simulated with our three dimensional, fully cosmological chemodynamical galaxy evolution code GCD+. We study how [Fe/H], [N/O], [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] vary with galactocentric radius. For the young stars of the disc, we found a negative slope for [Fe/H] and [N/O] but a positive [O/Fe], [Mg/Fe] and [Si/Fe] slope with radius. By analysing the star formation rate (SFR) at different radii, we found that the simulated disc contains a greater fraction of young stars in the outer regions, while the old stars tend to be concentrated in the inner parts of the disc. This can explain the positive [alpha/Fe] gradient as well as the negative [N/O] gradient with radius. This radial trend is a natural outcome of an inside-out formation of the disc, regardless of its size and can thus explain the recently observed positive [alpha/Fe] gradients in the Milky Way disc open clusters.