• Citizen science often requires volunteers to perform low-skill tasks such as counting and documenting en- vironmental features. In this work, we contend that these tasks do not adequately meet the needs of citizen scientists motivated by scientific learning. We propose to provide intrinsic motivation by asking them to no- tice, compare, and synthesize qualitative observations. We describe the process of learning and performing qualitative assessments in the domain of water quality monitoring, which appraises the impact of land use on habitat quality and biological diversity. We use the example of water monitoring because qualitative wa- tershed assessments are exclusively performed by professionals, yet do not require specialized tools, making it an excellent fit for volunteers. Within this domain, we observe and report on differences in background and training between professional and volunteer monitors, using these experiences to synthesize findings about volunteer training needs. Our findings reveal that to successfully make qualitative stream assessments, vol- unteers need to: (1) experience a diverse range of streams, (2) discuss judgments with other monitors, and (3) construct internal narratives about water quality. We use our findings to describe how different technologies may support these needs and generalize our findings to the larger citizen science community.
  • Environmental citizen science frequently relies on experience-based assessment, however volunteers are not trained to make qualitative judgments. Embodied learning in virtual reality (VR) has been explored as a way to train behavior, but has not fully been considered as a way to train judgment. This preliminary research explores embodied learning in VR through the design, evaluation, and redesign of StreamBED, a water quality monitoring training environment that teaches volunteers to make qualitative assessments by exploring, assessing and comparing virtual watersheds.
  • Workshops are used for academic social networking, but connections can be superficial and result in few enduring collaborations. This unworkshop offers a novel interactive format to create deep connections, peer- learning, and produces a technology-enhanced experience. Participants will generate interactive technological artifacts before the unworkshop, which will be used together and orchestrated at the unworkshop to engage all participants in an alternate reality game set in local places at the conference.
  • Mixed reality experiences often require detailed narrative that can be used to craft physical and virtual design components. This work elaborates on a mentoring experience at the Carnegie Mellon's ETC to consider how improv games may be used ideate and iterate on storytelling experiences.
  • As the internet of things (IoT) has integrated physical and digital technologies, designing for multiple sensory media (mulsemedia) has become more attainable. Designing technology for multiple senses has the capacity to improve virtual realism, extend our ability to process information, and more easily transfer knowledge between physical and digital environments. HCI researchers are beginning to explore the viability of integrating multimedia into virtual experiences, however research has yet to consider whether mulsemedia truly enhances realism, immersion and knowledge transfer. My work developing StreamBED, a VR training platform to train citizen science water monitors plans to consider the role of mulsemedia in immersion and learning goals. Future findings about the role of mulsemedia in learning contexts will potentially allow learners to experience, connect to, learn from spaces that are impossible to experience firsthand.
  • Audience interactivity is interpreted differently across domains. This research develops a framework to describe audience interactivity across a broad range of experiences. We build on early work characterizing child audience interactivity experiences, expanding on these findings with an extensive review of literature in theater, games, and theme parks, paired with expert interviews in those domains. The framework scaffolds interactivity as nested spheres of audience influence, and comprises a series of dimensions of audience interactivity including a Spectrum of Audience Interactivity. This framework aims to develop a common taxonomy for researchers and practitioners working with audience interactivity experiences.
  • Live interactions have the potential to meaningfully engage audiences during musical performances, and modern technologies promise unique ways to facilitate these interactions. This work presents findings from three co-design sessions with children that investigated how audiences might want to interact with live music performances, including design considerations and opportunities. Findings from these sessions also formed a Spectrum of Audience Interactivity in live musical performances, outlining ways to encourage interactivity in music performances from the child perspective.
  • StreamBED is an embodied VR training for citizen scientists to make qualitative stream assessments. Early findings garnered positive feedback about training qualitative assessment using a virtual representation of different stream spaces, but presented field-specific challenges; novice biologists had trouble interpreting qualitative protocols, and needed substantive guidance to look for and interpret environment cues. In order to address these issues in the redesign, this work uses research through design (RTD) methods to consider feedback from expert stream biologists, firsthand stream monitoring experience, discussions with education and game designers, and feedback from a low fidelity prototype. The qualitative findings found that training should facilitate personal narratives, maximize realism, and should use social dynamics to scaffold learning.