• Metallic nanowires are known to break into shorter fragments due to the Rayleigh instability mechanism. This process is strongly accelerated at elevated temperatures and can completely hinder the functioning of nanowire-based devices like e.g. transparent conductive and flexible coatings. At the same time, arranged gold nanodots have important applications in electrochemical sensors. In this paper we perform a series of annealing experiments of gold and silver nanowires and nanowire junctions at fixed temperatures 473, 673, 873 and 973 K (200, 400, 600 and 700 {\deg}C) during a time period of 10 minutes. We show that nanowires are especially prone to fragmentation around junctions and crossing points even at comparatively low temperatures. The fragmentation process is highly temperature dependent and the junction region breaks up at a lower temperature than a single nanowire. We develop a gold parametrization for Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrate the surface diffusion origin of the nanowire junction fragmentation. We show that nanowire fragmentation starts at the junctions with high reliability and propose that aligning nanowires in a regular grid could be used as a technique for fabricating arrays of nanodots.
  • We propose a method for efficiently coupling the finite element method with atomistic simulations, while using molecular dynamics or kinetic Monte Carlo techniques. Our method can dynamically build an optimized unstructured mesh that follows the geometry defined by atomistic data. On this mesh, different multiphysics problems can be solved to obtain distributions of physical quantities of interest, which can be fed back to the atomistic system. The simulation flow is optimized to maximize computational efficiency while maintaining good accuracy. This is achieved by providing the modules for a) optimization of the density of the generated mesh according to requirements of a specific geometry and b) efficient extension of the finite element domain without a need to extend the atomistic one. Our method is organized as an open-source C++ code. In the current implementation, an efficient Laplace equation solver for calculation of electric field distribution near rough atomistic surface demonstrates the capability of the suggested approach.
  • Self-sputtering of copper under high electric fields is considered to contribute to plasma buildup during a vacuum breakdown event frequently observed near metal surfaces, even in ultra high vacuum condition in different electric devices. In this study, by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the effect of surface temperature and morphology on the yield of self-sputtering of copper with ion energies of 0.1-5 keV. We analyze all three low-index surfaces of Cu, {100}, {110} and {111}, held at different temperatures, 300 K, 500 K and 1200 K. The surface roughness relief is studied by either varying the angle of incidence on flat surfaces, or by using arbitrary roughened surfaces, which result in a more natural distribution of surface relief variations. Our simulations provide detailed characterization of copper self-sputtering with respect to different material temperatures, crystallographic orientations, surface roughness, energies, and angles of ion incidence.
  • Irradiation of a sharp tungsten tip by a femtosecond laser and exposed to a strong DC electric field led to gradual and reproducible surface modifications. By a combination of field emission microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed asymmetric surface faceting with sub-ten nanometer high steps. The presence of well pronounced faceted features mainly on the laser-exposed side implies that the surface modification was driven by a laser-induced transient temperature rise -- on a scale of a couple of picoseconds -- in the tungsten tip apex. Moreover, we identified the formation of a nano-tip a few nanometers high located at one of the corners of a faceted plateau. The results of simulations emulating the experimental conditions, are consistent with the experimental observations. The presented conditions can be used as a new method to fabricate nano-tips of few nm height, which can be used in coherent electron pulses generation. Besides the direct practical application, the results also provide insight into the microscopic mechanisms of light-matter interaction. The apparent growth mechanism of the features may also help to explain the origin of enhanced electron field emission, which leads to vacuum arcs, in high electric-field devices such as radio-frequency particle accelerators.
  • The shape memory effect and pseudoelasticity in Cu nanowires is one possible pair of mechanisms that prevents high aspect ratio nanosized field electron emitters to be stable at room temperature and permits their growth under high electric field. By utilizing hybrid electrodynamics molecular dynamics simulations we show that a global electric field of 1 GV/m or more significantly increases the stability and critical temperature of spontaneous reorientation of nanosized <100> Cu field emitters. We also show that in the studied tips the stabilizing effect of an external applied electric field is an order of magnitude greater than the destabilization caused by the field emission current. We detect the critical temperature of spontaneous reorientation using the tool that spots the changes in crystal structure. The method is compatible with techniques that consider the change in potential energy, has a wider range of applicability and allows pinpointing different stages in the reorientation processes.
  • Modeling semicoherent metal-metal interfaces has so far been performed using atomistic simulations based on semiempirical interatomic potentials. We demonstrate through more precise ab-initio calculations that key conclusions drawn from previous studies do not conform with the new results which show that single point defects do not delocalize near the interfacial plane, but remain compact. We give a simple qualitative explanation for the difference in predicted results that can be traced back to shortcomings in potential fitting.