• In the following, we present example illustrative and experimental results comparing fair schedulers allocating resources from multiple servers to distributed application frameworks. Resources are allocated so that at least one resource is exhausted in every server. Schedulers considered include DRF (DRFH) and Best-Fit DRF (BF-DRF), TSF, and PS-DSF. We also consider server selection under Randomized Round Robin (RRR) and based on their residual (unreserved) resources. In the following, we consider cases with frameworks of equal priority and without server-preference constraints. We first give typical results of a illustrative numerical study and then give typical results of a study involving Spark workloads on Mesos which we have modified and open-sourced to prototype different schedulers.
  • We consider scaling laws for maximal energy efficiency of communicating a message to all the nodes in a wireless network, as the number of nodes in the network becomes large. Two cases of large wireless networks are studied -- dense random networks and constant density (extended) random networks. In addition, we also study finite size regular networks in order to understand how regularity in node placement affects energy consumption. We first establish an information-theoretic lower bound on the minimum energy per bit for multicasting in arbitrary wireless networks when the channel state information is not available at the transmitters. Upper bounds are obtained by constructing a simple flooding scheme that requires no information at the receivers about the channel states or the locations and identities of the nodes. The gap between the upper and lower bounds is only a constant factor for dense random networks and regular networks, and differs by a poly-logarithmic factor for extended random networks. Furthermore, we show that the proposed upper and lower bounds for random networks hold almost surely in the node locations as the number of nodes approaches infinity.