• The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3 Unit (3U) CubeSat designed for a 3-month mission to study solar soft X-ray spectral irradiance. The first of the two flight models was deployed from the International Space Station in 2016 May and operated for one year before its natural deorbiting. This was the first flight of the Blue Canyon Technologies XACT 3-axis attitude determination and control system -- a commercially available, high-precision pointing system. We characterized the performance of the pointing system on orbit including performance at low altitudes where drag torque builds up. We found that the pointing accuracy was 0.0042\degree\ - 0.0117\degree\ (15$''$ - 42$''$, 3$\sigma$, axis dependent) consistently from 190 km - 410 km, slightly better than the specification sheet states. Peak-to-peak jitter was estimated to be 0.0073\degree\ (10 s$^{-1}$) - 0.0183\degree\ (10 s$^{-1}$) (26$''$ (10 s$^{-1}$) - 66$''$ (10 s$^{-1}$), 3$\sigma$). The system was capable of dumping momentum until an altitude of 185 km. We found small amounts of sensor degradation in the star tracker and coarse sun sensor. Our mission profile did not require high-agility maneuvers so we are unable to characterize this metric. Without a GPS receiver, it was necessary to periodically upload ephemeris information to update the orbit propagation model and maintain pointing. At 400 km, these uploads were required once every other week. At $\sim$270 km, they were required every day. We also characterized the power performance of our electric power system, which includes a novel pseudo-peak power tracker -- a resistor that limited the current draw from the battery on the solar panels. With 19 30\% efficient solar cells and an 8 W system load, the power balance had 65\% of margin on orbit. We present several recommendations to other CubeSat programs throughout.
  • In this study we synthesize the results of four previous studies on the global energetics of solar flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which include magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies in 399 solar M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. Our findings are: (1) The sum of the mean nonthermal energy of flare-accelerated particles ($E_{\mathrm{nt}}$), the energy of direct heating ($E_{\mathrm{dir}}$), and the energy in coronal mass ejections ($E_{\mathrm{CME}}$), which are the primary energy dissipation processes in a flare, is found to have a ratio of $(E_{\mathrm{nt}}+E_{\mathrm{dir}}+ E_{\mathrm{CME}})/E_{\mathrm{mag}} = 0.87 \pm 0.18$, compared with the dissipated magnetic free energy $E_{\mathrm{mag}}$, which confirms energy closure within the measurement uncertainties and corroborates the magnetic origin of flares and CMEs; (2) The energy partition of the dissipated magnetic free energy is: $0.51\pm0.17$ in nonthermal energy of $\ge 6$ keV electrons, $0.17\pm0.17$ in nonthermal $\ge 1$ MeV ions, $0.07\pm0.14$ in CMEs, and $0.07\pm0.17$ in direct heating; (3) The thermal energy is almost always less than the nonthermal energy, which is consistent with the thick-target model; (4) The bolometric luminosity in white-light flares is comparable with the thermal energy in soft X-rays (SXR); (5) Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events carry a fraction $\approx 0.03$ of the CME energy, which is consistent with CME-driven shock acceleration; and (6) The warm-target model predicts a lower limit of the low-energy cutoff at $e_c \approx 6$ keV, based on the mean differential emission measure (DEM) peak temperature of $T_e=8.6$ MK during flares. This work represents the first statistical study that establishes energy closure in solar flare/CME events.
  • Decades of astrophysical observations have convincingly shown that soft X-ray (SXR; ~0.1--10 keV) emission provides unique diagnostics for the high temperature plasmas observed in solar flares and active regions. SXR observations critical for constraining models of energy release in these phenomena can be provided using instruments that have already been flown on sounding rockets and CubeSats, including miniaturized high-resolution photon-counting spectrometers and a novel diffractive spectral imager. These instruments have relatively low cost and high TRL, and would complement a wide range of mission concepts. In this white paper, we detail the scientific background and open questions motivating these instruments, the measurements required, and the instruments themselves that will make groundbreaking progress in answering these questions.
  • How impulsive magnetic energy release leads to solar eruptions and how those eruptions are energized and evolve are vital unsolved problems in Heliophysics. The standard model for solar eruptions summarizes our current understanding of these events. Magnetic energy in the corona is released through drastic restructuring of the magnetic field via reconnection. Electrons and ions are then accelerated by poorly understood processes. Theories include contracting loops, merging magnetic islands, stochastic acceleration, and turbulence at shocks, among others. Although this basic model is well established, the fundamental physics is poorly understood. HXR observations using grazing-incidence focusing optics can now probe all of the key regions of the standard model. These include two above-the-looptop (ALT) sources which bookend the reconnection region and are likely the sites of particle acceleration and direct heating. The science achievable by a direct HXR imaging instrument can be summarized by the following science questions and objectives which are some of the most outstanding issues in solar physics (1) How are particles accelerated at the Sun? (1a) Where are electrons accelerated and on what time scales? (1b) What fraction of electrons is accelerated out of the ambient medium? (2) How does magnetic energy release on the Sun lead to flares and eruptions? A Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) instrument, which can be built now using proven technology and at modest cost, would enable revolutionary advancements in our understanding of impulsive magnetic energy release and particle acceleration, a process which is known to occur at the Sun but also throughout the Universe.
  • Even in the absence of resolved flares, the corona is heated to several million degrees. However, despite its importance for the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the solar atmosphere, the origin of this heating remains poorly understood. Several observational and theoretical considerations suggest that the heating is driven by small, impulsive energy bursts which could be Parker-style "nanoflares" (Parker 1988) that arise via reconnection within the tangled and twisted coronal magnetic field. The classical "smoking gun" (Klimchuk 2009; Cargill et al. 2013) for impulsive heating is the direct detection of widespread hot plasma (T > 6 MK) with a low emission measure. In recent years there has been great progress in the development of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters that make them more ideal for studying the Sun. When combined with grazing-incidence focusing optics, they provide direct spectroscopic imaging over a broad energy band (0.5 to 10 keV) combined with extremely impressive energy resolution in small pixels, as low as 0.7 eV (FWHM) at 1.5 keV (Lee 2015), and 1.56 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV (Smith 2012), two orders of magnitude better than the current best traditional solid state photon-counting spectrometers. Decisive observations of the hot plasma associated with nanoflare models of coronal heating can be provided by new solar microcalorimeters. These measurements will cover the most important part of the coronal spectrum for searching for the nanoflare-related hot plasma and will characterize how much nanoflares can heat the corona both in active regions and the quiet Sun. Finally, microcalorimeters will enable to study all of this as a function of time and space in each pixel simultaneously a capability never before available.
  • The goal of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is to explore the energy distribution of soft X-ray (SXR) emissions from the quiescent Sun, active regions, and during solar flares, and to model the impact on Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. The energy emitted in the SXR range (0.1 --10 keV) can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXRs to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. The MinXSS primary science instrument is an Amptek, Inc. X123 X-ray spectrometer that has an energy range of 0.5--30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution. Two flight models have been built. The first, MinXSS-1, has been making science observations since 2016 June 9, and has observed numerous flares, including more than 40 C-class and 7 M-class flares. These SXR spectral measurements have advantages over broadband SXR observations, such as providing the capability to derive multiple-temperature components and elemental abundances of coronal plasma, improved irradiance accuracy, and higher resolution spectral irradiance as input to planetary ionosphere simulations. MinXSS spectra obtained during the M5.0 flare on 2016 July 23 highlight these advantages, and indicate how the elemental abundance appears to change from primarily coronal to more photospheric during the flare. MinXSS-1 observations are compared to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-Ray Sensor (XRS) measurements of SXR irradiance and estimated corona temperature. Additionally, a suggested improvement to the calibration of the GOES XRS data is presented.
  • The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) are twin 3U CubeSats. The first of the twin CubeSats (MinXSS-1) launched in December 2015 to the International Space Station for deployment in mid-2016. Both MinXSS CubeSats utilize a commercial off the shelf (COTS) X-ray spectrometer from Amptek to measure the solar irradiance from 0.5 to 30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution at 5.9 keV, and a LASP-developed X-ray broadband photometer with similar spectral sensitivity. MinXSS design and development has involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The majority of previous solar soft X-ray measurements have been either at high spectral resolution with a narrow bandpass or spectrally integrating (broadband) photometers. MinXSS will conduct unique soft X-ray measurements with moderate spectral resolution over a relatively large energy range to study solar active region evolution, solar flares, and the effects of solar soft X-ray emission on Earth's ionosphere. This paper focuses on the X-ray spectrometer instrument characterization techniques involving radioactive X-ray sources and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF). Spectrometer spectral response, spectral resolution, response linearity are discussed as well as future solar science objectives.
  • This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 yrs of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power law slope and flux, and the thermal/nonthermal cross-over energy $e_{\mathrm{co}}$. From these parameters we calculate the total nonthermal energy $E_{\mathrm{nt}}$ in electrons with two different methods: (i) using the observed cross-over energy $e_{\mathrm{co}}$ as low-energy cutoff, and (ii) using the low-energy cutoff $e_{\mathrm{wt}}$ predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. {\bf Based on a mean temperature of $T_e=8.6$ MK in active regions we find low-energy cutoff energies of $e_{\mathrm{wt}} =6.2\pm 1.6$ keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies $e_{\mathrm{co}}=21 \pm 6$ keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies $E_{\mathrm{mag}}$ and thermal energies $E_{\mathrm{th}}$ from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: $E_{\mathrm{nt}} = 0.41 \ E_{\mathrm{mag}}$, $E_{\mathrm{th}} = 0.08 \ E_{\mathrm{mag}}$, and $E_{\mathrm{th}} = 0.15 \ E_{\mathrm{nt}}$. The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85\% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.
  • We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the \textit{Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray} ({\em NuSTAR}) hard X-ray telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, {\em NuSTAR} nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at hard X-ray energies ($>$3~keV) with an increase in sensitivity of at least two magnitude compared to current non-focusing telescopes. In this paper we describe the scientific areas where \textit{NuSTAR} will make major improvements on existing solar measurements. We report on the techniques used to observe the Sun with \textit{NuSTAR}, their limitations and complications, and the procedures developed to optimize solar data quality derived from our experience with the initial solar observations. These first observations are briefly described, including the measurement of the Fe K-shell lines in a decaying X-class flare, hard X-ray emission from high in the solar corona, and full-disk hard X-ray images of the Sun.
  • The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3-Unit (3U) CubeSat developed at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder (CU). Over 40 students contributed to the project with professional mentorship and technical contributions from professors in the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department at CU and from LASP scientists and engineers. The scientific objective of MinXSS is to study processes in the dynamic Sun, from quiet-Sun to solar flares, and to further understand how these changes in the Sun influence the Earth's atmosphere by providing unique spectral measurements of solar soft x-rays (SXRs). The enabling technology providing the advanced solar SXR spectral measurements is the Amptek X123, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) silicon drift detector (SDD). The Amptek X123 has a low mass (~324 g after modification), modest power consumption (~2.50 W), and small volume (6.86 cm x 9.91 cm x 2.54 cm), making it ideal for a CubeSat. This paper provides an overview of the MinXSS mission: the science objectives, project history, subsystems, and lessons learned that can be useful for the small-satellite community.
  • The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for a M3.7 flare observed on 25 September 2011 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O VI, Fe X, Fe XII, Fe XIV, Fe XV, Fe XVI, Fe XVII, Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena was observed including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV lines were observed with Doppler speeds greater than 500 km s$^{-1}$. For ions such as Fe XV both evaporative outflows (~200 km s$^{-1}$) and downflows (~30-50 km s$^{-1}$) were observed. Non-thermal motions from 120 to 300 km s$^{-1}$ were measured in flare lines. In the surge, Doppler speeds are found from about 0 to over 250 km s$^{-1}$ in lines from ions such as Fe XIV. The non-thermal motions could be due to multiple sources slightly Doppler-shifted from each other or turbulence in the evaporating plasma. We estimate the energetics of the hard X-ray burst and obtain a total flare energy in accelerated electrons of $\geq7\times10^{28}$ ergs. This is a lower limit because only an upper limit can be determined for the low energy cutoff to the electron spectrum. We find that detailed modeling of this event would require a multi-threaded model due to its complexity.
  • We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially-invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically-determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities with spatially-integrated spectral models including multiple isothermal components to effectively isolate the individual thermal sources from the combined emission and image them separately. We apply this technique to the 2002 July 23 X4.8 event studied in prior works, and image for the first time the super-hot and cooler thermal sources independently. The super-hot source is farther from the footpoints and more elongated throughout the impulsive phase, consistent with an in situ heating mechanism for the super-hot plasma.
  • The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ~0.2 and ~4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially-integrated solar spectral irradiance from ~0.5 to ~5 keV, with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5-10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ~6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential (FIP) elements of only ~1.6, below the usually-observed value of ~4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.
  • Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from $\lesssim$2 to $\gtrsim$50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly-observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ~2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to $\gtrsim$10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low-energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly-observed ~0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.
  • We use RHESSI high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations from ~6 to 100 keV to determine the statistical relationships between measured parameters (temperature, emission measure, etc.) of hot, thermal plasma in 37 intense (GOES M- and X-class) solar flares. The RHESSI data, most sensitive to the hottest flare plasmas, reveal a strong correlation between the maximum achieved temperature and the flare GOES class, such that "super-hot" temperatures >30 MK are achieved almost exclusively by X-class events; the observed correlation differs significantly from that of GOES-derived temperatures, and from previous studies. A nearly-ubiquitous association with high emission measures, electron densities, and instantaneous thermal energies suggests that super-hot plasmas are physically distinct from cooler, ~10-20 MK GOES plasmas, and that they require substantially greater energy input during the flare. High thermal energy densities suggest that super-hot flares require strong coronal magnetic fields, exceeding ~100 G, and that both the plasma {\beta} and volume filling factor f cannot be much less than unity in the super-hot region.
  • We analyze and model an M8.0 flare on 2005 May 13 observed by TRACE and RHESSI to determine the energy release rate from magnetic reconnection that forms and heats numerous flare loops. The flare exhibits two ribbons in UV 1600 {\AA} emission. Analysis shows that the UV light curve at each flaring pixel rises impulsively within a few minutes, and decays slowly with a timescale >10 min. Since the lower atmosphere (transition region and chromosphere) responds to energy deposit nearly instantaneously, the rapid UV brightening is thought to reflect the energy release process in the newly formed flare loop rooted at the footpoint. We utilize spatially resolved (down to 1 arcsec) UV light curves and thick-target hard X-ray emission to construct heating functions of a few thousand flare loops anchored at UV foot points, and compute plasma evolution in these loops using the EBTEL model. The modeled coronal temperatures and densities of these flare loops are used to calculate synthetic soft X-ray spectra and light curves, which compare favorably with those observed by RHESSI and GOES/XRS. The time-dependent transition region DEM for each loop during its decay phase is also computed with a simplified model and used to calculate the optically-thin C IV line emission, which dominates the UV 1600 {\AA} bandpass during the flare. The computed C IV line emission decays at the same rate as observed. This study presents a method to constrain heating of reconnection-formed flare loops using all available observables independently, and provides insight into the physics of energy release and plasma heating during the flare. With this method, the lower limit of the total energy used to heat the flare loops in this event is estimated to be 1.22e31 ergs, of which only 1.9e30 ergs is carried by beam-driven upflows during the impulsive phase, suggesting that the coronal plasmas are predominantly heated in situ.
  • We present an overview of solar flares and associated phenomena, drawing upon a wide range of observational data primarily from the RHESSI era. Following an introductory discussion and overview of the status of observational capabilities, the article is split into topical sections which deal with different areas of flare phenomena (footpoints and ribbons, coronal sources, relationship to coronal mass ejections) and their interconnections. We also discuss flare soft X-ray spectroscopy and the energetics of the process. The emphasis is to describe the observations from multiple points of view, while bearing in mind the models that link them to each other and to theory. The present theoretical and observational understanding of solar flares is far from complete, so we conclude with a brief discussion of models, and a list of missing but important observations.
  • The Sun offers a convenient nearby laboratory to study the physical processes of particle acceleration and impulsive energy release in magnetized plasmas that occur throughout the universe, from planetary magnetospheres to black hole accretion disks. Solar flares are the most powerful explosions in the solar system, releasing up to 10^32-10^33 ergs over only 100-1,000 seconds, accelerating electrons up to hundreds of MeV and heating plasma to tens of MK. The accelerated electrons and the hot plasma each contain tens of percent of the total flare energy, indicating an intimate link between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and flare energy release. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observes the X-ray emission from these processes from ~3 keV to ~17 MeV with unprecedented spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. RHESSI observations show that "super-hot" (>30 MK) plasma temperatures are achieved almost exclusively by intense, GOES X-class flares and appear to be strictly associated with coronal magnetic field strengths exceeding ~170 Gauss, suggesting a direct link between the magnetic field and heating of super-hot plasma. Images and spectra of the 2002 July 23 X4.8 event reveal that the super-hot plasma is both spectrally and spatially distinct from the commonly-observed ~10-20 MK plasma, and is located above the cooler source. It exists with high density even during the pre-impulsive phase, which is dominated by coronal non-thermal emission with negligible footpoints, suggesting that, rather than the traditional picture of chromospheric evaporation, the origins of super-hot plasma may be the compression and subsequent thermalization of ambient material accelerated in the reconnection region above the flare loop, a physically-plausible process not detectable with current instruments but potentially observable with future telescopes.