• A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially-resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally-incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is of the order of the pulsewidth, whereas a spatial resolution of a few microns is achieved by this optical technique. In addition, this technique does not suffer from refraction effects due to the steep plasma density gradients owing to the near-normal incidence of the probe pulse and consequently, higher harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The micron-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.
  • We report spatially and temporally resolved measurements of magnetic fields generated by petawatt laser-solid interactions with high spatial resolution, using optical polarimetry. The polarimetric measurements map the megagauss magnetic field profiles generated by the fast electron currents at the target rear. The magnetic fields at the rear of a 50 $\mu$m thick aluminum target exhibit distinct and unambiguous signatures of electron beam filamentation. These results are corroborated by hybrid simulations.
  • Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.