• Cosmology in the near future promises a measurement of the sum of neutrino masses, a fundamental Standard Model parameter, as well as substantially-improved constraints on the dark energy. We use the shape of the BOSS redshift-space galaxy power spectrum, in combination with CMB and supernova data, to constrain the neutrino masses and the dark energy. Essential to this calculation are several recent advances in non-linear cosmological perturbation theory, including FFT methods, redshift space distortions, and scale-dependent growth. Our 95% confidence upper bound of 180 meV on the sum of masses degrades substantially to 540 meV when the dark energy equation of state and its first derivative are also allowed to vary, representing a significant challenge to current constraints. We also study the impact of additional galaxy bias parameters, finding that a greater allowed range of scale-dependent bias only slightly shifts the preferred neutrino mass value, weakens its upper bound by about 20%, and has a negligible effect on the other cosmological parameters.
  • We introduce a new cosmic emulator for the matter power spectrum covering eight cosmological parameters. Targeted at optical surveys, the emulator provides accurate predictions out to a wavenumber k~5/Mpc and redshift z<=2. Besides covering the standard set of LCDM parameters, massive neutrinos and a dynamical dark energy of state are included. The emulator is built on a sample set of 36 cosmological models, carefully chosen to provide accurate predictions over the wide and large parameter space. For each model, we have performed a high-resolution simulation, augmented with sixteen medium-resolution simulations and TimeRG perturbation theory results to provide accurate coverage of a wide k-range; the dataset generated as part of this project is more than 1.2Pbyte. With the current set of simulated models, we achieve an accuracy of approximately 4%. Because the sampling approach used here has established convergence and error-control properties, follow-on results with more than a hundred cosmological models will soon achieve ~1% accuracy. We compare our approach with other prediction schemes that are based on halo model ideas and remapping approaches. The new emulator code is publicly available.
  • Gravity is the weakest fundamental interaction and the only one that has not been measured at the particle level. Traditional experimental methods, from astronomical observations to torsion balances, use macroscopic masses to both source and probe gravitational fields. Matter wave interferometers have used neutrons, atoms and molecular clusters as microscopic test particles, but initially probed the field sourced by the entire earth. Later, the gravitational field arising from hundreds of kilograms of artificial source masses was measured with atom interferometry. Miniaturizing the source mass and moving it into the vacuum chamber could improve positioning accuracy, allow the use of monocrystalline source masses for improved gravitational measurements, and test new physics, such as beyond-standard-model ("fifth") forces of nature and non-classical effects of gravity. In this work, we detect the gravitational force between freely falling cesium atoms and an in-vacuum, centimeter-sized source mass using atom interferometry with state-of-the-art sensitivity. The ability to sense gravitational-strength coupling is conjectured to access a natural lower bound for fundamental forces, thereby representing an important milestone in searches for physics beyond the standard model. A local, in-vacuum source mass is particularly sensitive to a wide class of interactions whose effects would otherwise be suppressed beyond detectability in regions of high matter density. For example, our measurement strengthens limits on a number of cosmologically-motivated scalar field models, such as chameleon and symmetron fields, by over two orders of magnitude and paves the way toward novel measurements of Newton's gravitational constant G and the gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect
  • Blue axion isocurvature perturbations are both theoretically well-motivated and interesting from a detectability perspective. These power spectra generically have a break from the blue region to a flat region. Previous investigations of the power spectra were analytic, which left a gap in the predicted spectrum in the break region due to the non-applicability of the used analytic techniques. We therefore compute the isocurvature spectrum numerically for an explicit supersymmetric axion model. We find a bump that enhances the isocurvature signal for this class of scenarios. A fitting function of three parameters is constructed that fits the spectrum well for the particular axion model we study. This fitting function should be useful for blue isocurvature signal hunting in data and making experimental sensitivity forecasts.
  • Large-scale structure surveys in the coming years will measure the redshift-space power spectrum to unprecedented accuracy, allowing for powerful new tests of the LambdaCDM picture as well as measurements of particle physics parameters such as the neutrino masses. We extend the Time-RG perturbative framework to redshift space, computing the power spectrum P_s(k,mu) in massive neutrino cosmologies with time-dependent dark energy equations of state w(z). Time-RG is uniquely capable of incorporating scale-dependent growth into the P_s(k,mu) computation, which is important for massive neutrinos as well as modified gravity models. Although changes to w(z) and the neutrino mass fraction both affect the late-time scale-dependence of the non-linear power spectrum, we find that the two effects depend differently on the line-of-sight angle mu. Finally, we use the HACC N-body code to quantify errors in the perturbative calculations. For a LambdaCDM model at redshift z=1, our procedure predicts the monopole~(quadrupole) to 1% accuracy up to a wave number 0.19h/Mpc (0.28h/Mpc), compared to 0.08h/Mpc (0.07h/Mpc) for the Kaiser approximation and 0.19h/Mpc (0.16h/Mpc) for the current state-of-the-art perturbation scheme. Our calculation agrees with the simulated redshift-space power spectrum even for neutrino masses above the current bound, and for rapidly-evolving dark energy equations of state, |dw/dz| ~ 1. Along with this article, we make our redshift-space Time-RG implementation publicly available as the code redTime.
  • Over the next decade, cosmological measurements of the large-scale structure of the Universe will be sensitive to the combined effects of dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. The matter power spectrum is a key repository of this information. We extend higher-order perturbative methods for computing the power spectrum to investigate these effects over quasi-linear scales. Through comparison with N-body simulations we establish the regime of validity of a Time-Renormalization Group (Time-RG) perturbative treatment that includes dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. We also quantify the accuracy of Standard (SPT), Renormalized (RPT) and Lagrangian Resummation (LPT) perturbation theories without massive neutrinos. We find that an approximation that neglects neutrino clustering as a source for nonlinear matter clustering predicts the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak position to 0.25% accuracy for redshifts 1 < z < 3, justifying the use of LPT for BAO reconstruction in upcoming surveys. We release a modified version of the public Copter code which includes the additional physics discussed in the paper.
  • A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an "afterglow" experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for $\phi^4$ and $1/\phi$ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.
  • The discovery of cosmic acceleration has stimulated theorists to consider dark energy or modifications to Einstein's General Relativity as possible explanations. The last decade has seen advances in theories that go beyond smooth dark energy -- modified gravity and interactions of dark energy. While the theoretical terrain is being actively explored, the generic presence of fifth forces and dark sector couplings suggests a set of distinct observational signatures. This report focuses on observations that differ from the conventional probes that map the expansion history or large-scale structure. Examples of such novel probes are: detection of scalar fields via lab experiments, tests of modified gravity using stars and galaxies in the nearby universe, comparison of lensing and dynamical masses of galaxies and clusters, and the measurements of fundamental constants at high redshift. The observational expertise involved is very broad as it spans laboratory experiments, high resolution astronomical imaging and spectroscopy and radio observations. In the coming decade, searches for these effects have the potential for discovering fundamental new physics. We discuss how the searches can be carried out using experiments that are already under way or with modest adaptations of existing telescopes or planned experiments. The accompanying paper on the Growth of Cosmic Structure describes complementary tests of gravity with observations of large-scale structure.
  • Modifications to General Relativity typically introduce a scalar degree of freedom. Experimental constraints require that the "fifth" force produced by this field must be screened in high density environments. An important consequence of the screening mechanism is that the scalar charge of a spherically symmetric expanding or pulsating object, such as a supernova or variable star, is not conserved and monopole radiation can be emitted thereby. We calculate the energy loss rate due to scalar monopole radiation in supernovae and variable stars for a generalized model of f(R) gravity in which the matter coupling strength beta is allowed to be much larger than unity. For models which become screened at the gravitational potential of our galaxy, monopole radiation constraints require beta < 100.
  • The symmetron scalar field is a matter-coupled dark energy candidate which effectively decouples from matter in high-density regions through a symmetry restoration. We consider a previously unexplored regime, in which the vacuum mass $\mu \sim 2.4\times 10^{-3}$ eV of the symmetron is near the dark energy scale, and the matter coupling parameter $M \sim 1$ TeV is just beyond Standard Model energies. Such a field will give rise to a fifth force at submillimeter distances which can be probed by short-range gravity experiments. We show that a torsion pendulum experiment such as E\"ot-Wash can exclude symmetrons in this regime for all self-couplings $\lambda \lesssim 7.5$.
  • Chameleon dark energy is a matter-coupled scalar field which hides its fifth forces locally by becoming massive. We estimate torsion pendulum constraints on the residual fifth forces due to models with gravitation-strength couplings. Experiments such as Eot-Wash are on the verge of ruling out "quantum-stable" chameleon models, in which quantum corrections to the chameleon field and mass remain small. We also consider photon-coupled chameleons, which can be tested by afterglow experiments such as CHASE.
  • The chameleon scalar field is a matter-coupled dark energy candidate whose nonlinear self-interaction partially screens its fifth force at laboratory scales. Nevertheless, small-scale experiments such as the torsion pendulum can provide powerful constraints on chameleon models. Here we develop a simple approximation for computing chameleon fifth forces in torsion pendulum experiments such as Eot-Wash. We show that our approximation agrees well with published constraints on the quartic chameleon, and we use it to extend these constraints to a much wider range of models. Finally, we forecast the constraints which will result from the next-generation Eot-Wash experiment, and show that this experiment will exclude a wide range of quantum-stable models.
  • Chameleon scalar fields are dark energy candidates which suppress fifth forces in high density regions of the universe by becoming massive. We consider chameleon models as effective field theories and estimate quantum corrections to their potentials. Requiring that quantum corrections be small, so as to allow reliable predictions of fifth forces, leads to an upper bound $m < 0.0073 (\rho / 10 {\rm g\, cm}^{-3})^{1/3}$eV for gravitational strength coupling whereas fifth force experiments place a lower bound of $m>0.0042$\,eV. An improvement of less than a factor of two in the range of fifth force experiments could test all classical chameleon field theories whose quantum corrections are well-controlled and couple to matter with nearly gravitational strength regardless of the specific form of the chameleon potential.
  • Chameleon fields, which are scalar field dark energy candidates, can evade fifth force constraints by becoming massive in high-density regions. However, this property allows chameleon particles to be trapped inside a vacuum chamber with dense walls. Afterglow experiments constrain photon-coupled chameleon fields by attempting to produce and trap chameleon particles inside such a vacuum chamber, from which they will emit an afterglow as they regenerate photons. Here we discuss several theoretical and systematic effects underlying the design and analysis of the GammeV and CHASE afterglow experiments. We consider chameleon particle interactions with photons, Fermions, and other chameleon particles, as well as with macroscopic magnetic fields and matter. The afterglow signal in each experiment is predicted, and its sensitivity to various properties of the experimental apparatus is studied. Finally, we use CHASE data to exclude a wide range of photon-coupled chameleon dark energy models.
  • Chameleon particles, which could explain dark energy, are in many ways similar to axions, suggesting that an axion helioscope can be used for chameleon detection. The distinguishing property of chameleon particles is that, unlike Standard Model particles, their effective masses depend upon the ambient matter-energy density. The associated total internal reflection of chameleons up to keV energies by a dense layer of material, which would occur at grazing incidence on the mirrors of an X-ray telescope, lead to new experimental techniques for detecting such particles. We discuss here when this total internal reflection can happen and how it can be implemented in existing or future state-of-the-art chameleon telescopes. Solar Chameleons would be emitted mainly with energies below a few keV suggesting the X-ray telescope as the basic component in chameleon telescopy. The implementation of this idea is straightforward, but it deserves further scrutiny. It seems promising to prepare and run a dark energy particle candidate detection experiment combining existing equipment. For example, large volumes and strong solenoid magnetic fields, which are not appropriate for solar axion investigations, are attractive from the point of view of chameleon telescopy.
  • We report on the design and results of the GammeV search for axion-like particles and for chameleon particles. We also discuss plans for an improved experiment to search for chameleon particles, one which is sensitive to both cosmological and power-law chameleon models. Plans for an improved axion-like particle search using coupled resonant cavities are also presented. This experiment will be more sensitive to axion-like particles than stellar astrophysical models or current helioscope experiments.
  • We refute recent claims in the literature that stars with relativistically deep potentials cannot exist in $f(R)$ gravity. Numerical examples of stable stars, including relativistic ($GM_\star/r_\star \sim 0.1$), constant density stars, are studied. As a star is made larger, non-linear "chameleon" effects screen much of the star's mass, stabilizing gravity at the stellar center. Furthermore, we show that the onset of this chameleon screening is unrelated to strong gravity. At large central pressures $P>\rho/3$, $f(R)$ gravity, like general relativity, does have a maximum gravitational potential, but at a slightly smaller value: $GM_\star/r_\star = 0.345 < 4/9$ for constant density and one choice of parameters. This difference is associated with negative central curvature $R$ under general relativity not being accessed in the $f(R)$ model, but does not apply to any known astrophysical object.
  • Scalar self interactions are known to weaken considerably the current constraints on scalar-mediated fifth forces. We consider a scalar field with a quartic self interaction and gravitation-strength Yukawa couplings to matter particles. After discussing the phenomenology of this scalar field, we assess the ability of ongoing and planned experiments to detect the fifth force mediated by such a field. Assuming that the quartic and matter couplings are of order unity, the current-generation Eot-Wash experiment at the University of Washington will be able to explore an interesting subset of parameter space. The next-generation Eot-Wash experiment is expected to be able to detect, or to rule out, the fifth force due to such a scalar with unit quartic and matter couplings at the 3 sigma confidence level.
  • We consider how well the dark energy equation of state $w$ as a function of red shift $z$ will be measured using current and anticipated experiments. We use a procedure which takes fair account of the uncertainties in the functional dependence of $w$ on $z$, as well as the parameter degeneracies, and avoids the use of strong prior constraints. We apply the procedure to current data from WMAP, SDSS, and the supernova searches, and obtain results that are consistent with other analyses using different combinations of data sets. The effects of systematic experimental errors and variations in the analysis technique are discussed. Next, we use the same procedure to forecast the dark energy constraints achieveable by the end of the decade, assuming 8 years of WMAP data and realistic projections for ground-based measurements of supernovae and weak lensing. We find the $2 \sigma$ constraints on the current value of $w$ to be $\Delta w_0 (2 \sigma) = 0.20$, and on $dw/dz$ (between $z=0$ and $z=1$) to be $\Delta w_1 (2 \sigma)=0.37$. Finally, we compare these limits to other projections in the literature. Most show only a modest improvement; others show a more substantial improvement, but there are serious concerns about systematics. The remaining uncertainty still allows a significant span of competing dark energy models. Most likely, new kinds of measurements, or experiments more sophisticated than those currently planned, are needed to reveal the true nature of dark energy.