• In this research, we proposes a new method for cooperation and underlay mode selection in cognitive radio networks. We characterize the maximum achievable throughput of our proposed method of hybrid spectrum sharing. Hybrid spectrum sharing is assumed where the Secondary User (SU) can access the Primary User (PU) channel in two modes, underlay mode or cooperative mode with admission control. In addition to access the channel in the overlay mode, secondary user is allowed to occupy the channel currently occupied by the primary user but with small transmission power. Adding the underlay access modes attains more opportunities to the secondary user to transmit data. It is proposed that the secondary user can only exploits the underlay access when the channel of the primary user direct link is good or predicted to be in non-outage state. Therefore, the secondary user could switch between underlay spectrum sharing and cooperation with the primary user. Hybrid access is regulated through monitoring the state of the primary link. By observing the simulation results, the proposed model attains noticeable improvement in the system performance in terms of maximum secondary user throughput than the conventional cooperation and non-cooperation schemes.
  • This paper investigates the maximum stable throughput of a cooperative cognitive radio system with energy harvesting Primary User and Secondary User. Each PU and SU has a data queue for data storage and a battery for energy storage. These batteries harvest energy from the environment and store it for data transmission in next time slots. The SU is allowed to access the PU channel only when the PU is idle. The SU cooperates with the PU for its data transmission, getting mutual benefits for both users, such that, the PU exploits the SU power to relay a fraction of its undelivered packets, and the SU gets more opportunities to access idle time slots.
  • Frequency spectrum is one of the valuable resources in wireless communications. Using cognitive radio, spectrum efficiency will increase by making use of the spectrum holes. Dynamic Spectrum Access techniques allows secondary users to transmit on an empty channel not used by a primary user for a given time. In this paper, a Distributed Dynamic Spectrum Access based TDMA protocol (DDSAT) is designed and implemented on USRP. The proposed protocol performs two main functions: Spectrum Sensing, and Spectrum Management. Spectrum Sensing is performed to find spectrum holes in a co-operative manner using the contributing secondary users. Spectrum Management works distributively on the secondary users to allocate the spectrum holes in a fairly and efficient utilization. The DDSAT protocol is implemented using Software Defined Radio (SDR) and Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP). Evaluation and performance tests are conducted to show throughput and fairness of the system.
  • In this paper, we study and analyze fundamental throughput and delay tradeoffs in cooperative multiple access for cognitive radio systems. We focus on the class of randomized cooperative policies, whereby the secondary user (SU) serves either the queue of its own data or the queue of the primary user (PU) relayed data with certain service probabilities. Moreover, admission control is introduced at the relay queue, whereby a PU's packet is admitted to the relay queue with an admission probability. The proposed policy introduces a fundamental tradeoff between the delays of the PU and SU. Consequently, it opens room for trading the PU delay for enhanced SU delay and vice versa. Thus, the system could be tuned according to the demands of the intended application. Towards this objective, stability conditions for the queues involved in the system are derived. Furthermore, a moment generating function approach is employed to derive closed-form expressions for the average delay encountered by the packets of both users. The effect of varying the service and admission probabilities on the system's throughput and delay is thoroughly investigated. Results show that cooperation expands the stable throughput region. Moreover, numerical simulation results assert the extreme accuracy of the analytically derived delay expressions. In addition, we provide a criterion for the SU based on which it decides whether cooperation is beneficial to the PU or not. Furthermore, we show the impact of controlling the flow of data at the relay queue using the admission probability.
  • In this paper, we study and analyze fundamental throughput-delay tradeoffs in cooperative multiple access for cognitive radio systems. We focus on the class of randomized cooperative policies, whereby the secondary user (SU) serves either the queue of its own data or the queue of the primary user (PU) relayed data with certain service probabilities. The proposed policy opens room for trading the PU delay for enhanced SU delay. Towards this objective, stability conditions for the queues involved in the system are derived. Furthermore, a moment generating function approach is employed to derive closed-form expressions for the average delay encountered by the packets of both users. Results reveal that cooperation expands the stable throughput region of the system and significantly reduces the delay at both users. Moreover, we quantify the gain obtained in terms of the SU delay under the proposed policy, over conventional relaying that gives strict priority to the relay queue.
  • In this paper, we examine a cognitive spectrum access scheme in which secondary users exploit the primary feedback information. We consider an overlay secondary network employing a random access scheme in which secondary users access the channel by certain access probabilities that are function of the spectrum sensing metric. In setting our problem, we assume that secondary users can eavesdrop on the primary link's feedback. We study the cognitive radio network from a queuing theory point of view. Access probabilities are determined by solving a secondary throughput maximization problem subject to a constraint on the primary queues' stability. First, we formulate our problem which is found to be non-convex. Yet, we solve it efficiently by exploiting the structure of the secondary throughput equation. Our scheme yields improved results in, both, the secondary user throughput and the primary user packet delay. In addition, it comes very close to the optimal genie-aided scheme in which secondary users act upon the presumed perfect knowledge of the primary user's activity.