• We formulate optimization problems to study how data centers might modulate their power demands for cost-effective operation taking into account three key complex features exhibited by real-world electricity pricing schemes: (i) time-varying prices (e.g., time-of-day pricing, spot pricing, or higher energy prices during coincident peaks) and (ii) separate charge for peak power consumption. Our focus is on demand modulation at the granularity of an entire data center or a large part of it. For computational tractability reasons, we work with a fluid model for power demands which we imagine can be modulated using two abstract knobs of demand dropping and demand delaying (each with its associated penalties or costs). Given many data center workloads and electric prices can be effectively predicted using statistical modeling techniques, we devise a stochastic dynamic program (SDP) that can leverage such predictive models. Since the SDP can be computationally infeasible in many real platforms, we devise approximations for it. We also devise fully online algorithms that might be useful for scenarios with poor power demand or utility price predictability. For one of our online algorithms, we prove a competitive ratio of 2-1/n. Finally, using empirical evaluation with both real-world and synthetic power demands and real-world prices, we demonstrate the efficacy of our techniques. As two salient empirically-gained insights: (i) demand delaying is more effective than demand dropping regarding to peak shaving (e.g., 10.74% cost saving with only delaying vs. 1.45% with only dropping for Google workload) and (ii) workloads tend to have different cost saving potential under various electricity tariffs (e.g., 16.97% cost saving under peak-based tariff vs. 1.55% under time-varying pricing tariff for Facebook workload).
  • Since the electricity bill of a data center constitutes a significant portion of its overall operational costs, reducing this has become important. We investigate cost reduction opportunities that arise by the use of uninterrupted power supply (UPS) units as energy storage devices. This represents a deviation from the usual use of these devices as mere transitional fail-over mechanisms between utility and captive sources such as diesel generators. We consider the problem of opportunistically using these devices to reduce the time average electric utility bill in a data center. Using the technique of Lyapunov optimization, we develop an online control algorithm that can optimally exploit these devices to minimize the time average cost. This algorithm operates without any knowledge of the statistics of the workload or electricity cost processes, making it attractive in the presence of workload and pricing uncertainties. An interesting feature of our algorithm is that its deviation from optimality reduces as the storage capacity is increased. Our work opens up a new area in data center power management.