• We discuss the production of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) nuclei and neutrinos from blazars. We compute the nuclear cascade in the jet for both BL Lac objects and flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), and in the ambient radiation zones for FSRQs as well. By modeling representative spectral energy distributions along the blazar sequence, two distinct regimes are identified, which we call "nuclear survival" -- typically found in low-luminosity BL Lacs, and "nuclear cascade" -- typically found in high-luminosity FSRQs. We quantify how the neutrino and cosmic-ray (CR) emission efficiencies evolve over the blazar sequence, and demonstrate that neutrinos and CRs come from very different object classes. For example, high-frequency peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) tend to produce CRs, and HL-FSRQs are the more efficient neutrino emitters. This conclusion does not depend on the CR escape mechanism, for which we discuss two alternatives (diffusive and advective escape). Finally, the neutrino spectrum from blazars is shown to significantly depend on the injection composition into the jet, especially in the nuclear cascade case: Injection compositions heavier than protons lead to reduced neutrino production at the peak, which moves at the same time to lower energies. Thus, these sources will exhibit better compatibility with the observed IceCube and UHECR data.
  • The Monte Carlo model Sibyll has been designed for efficient simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest energies as needed for interpreting cosmic ray measurements. For more than 15 years, version 2.1 of Sibyll has been one of the standard models for air shower simulation. Motivated by data of LHC and fixed-target experiments and a better understanding of the phenomenology of hadronic interactions, we have developed an improved version of this model, version 2.3, which has been released in 2016. In this contribution we present a revised version of this model, called Sibyll 2.3c, that is further improved by adjusting particle production spectra to match the expectation of Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region. After a brief introduction to the changes implemented in Sibyll 2.3 and 2.3c with respect to Sibyll 2.1, the current predictions of the model for the depth of shower maximum, the number of muons at ground, and the energy spectrum of muons in extensive air showers are presented.
  • The determination of the injection composition of cosmic ray nuclei within astrophysical sources requires sufficiently accurate descriptions of the source physics and the propagation - apart from controlling astrophysical uncertainties. We therefore study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic ray astrophysics, which involves the photo-disintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that the impact of nuclear model uncertainties is potentially larger in environments with non-thermal radiation fields than in the cosmic microwave background. We also study the impact of nuclear models on the nuclear cascade in a gamma-ray burst radiation field, simulated at a level of complexity comparable to the most precise cosmic ray propagation code. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions in cosmic ray sources and propagation.
  • We discuss neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with the injection of nuclei, where we take into account that a nuclear cascade from photo-disintegration can fully develop in the source. One of our main objectives is to test if recent results from the IceCube and the Pierre Auger Observatory can be accommodated with the paradigm that GRBs are the sources of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). While our key results are obtained using an internal shock model, we discuss how the secondary emission from a GRB shell can be interpreted in terms of other astrophysical models. It is demonstrated that the expected neutrino flux from GRBs weakly depends on the injection composition, which implies that prompt neutrinos from GRBs can efficiently test the GRB-UHECR paradigm even if the UHECRs are nuclei. We show that the UHECR spectrum and composition, as measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory, can be self-consistently reproduced in a combined source-propagation model. In an attempt to describe the energy range including the ankle, we find tension with the IceCube bounds from the GRB stacking analyses. In an alternative scenario, where only the UHECRs beyond the ankle originate from GRBs, the requirement for a joint description of cosmic-ray and neutrino observations favors lower luminosities, which does not correspond to the typical expectation from {\gamma}-ray observations.
  • We study the Glashow resonance $\bar{\nu}_e + e^- \rightarrow W^- \rightarrow$ hadrons at 6.3 PeV as diagnostic of the production processes of ultra-high energy neutrinos. The focus lies on describing the physics of neutrino production from pion decay as accurate as possible by including the kinematics of weak decays and Monte Carlo simulations of pp and p$\gamma$ interactions. We discuss optically thick (to photohadronic interactions) sources, sources of cosmic ray nuclei and muon damped sources. Even in the proposed upgrade IceCube-Gen2, a discrimination of scenarios such as pp versus p$\gamma$ is extremely challenging under realistic assumptions. Nonetheless, the Glashow resonance can serve as a smoking gun signature of neutrino production from photohadronic (A$\gamma$) interactions of heavier nuclei, as the expected Glashow event rate exceeds that of pp interactions. We finally quantify the exposures for which the non-observation of Glashow events exerts pressure on certain scenarios.
  • The event generator Sibyll can be used for the simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest cosmic ray energies. It is optimized for providing an economic description of those aspects of the expected hadronic final states that are needed for the calculation of air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes. New measurements from fixed target and collider experiments, in particular those at LHC, allow us to test the predictive power of the model version 2.1, which was released more than 10 years ago, and also to identify shortcomings. Based on a detailed comparison of the model predictions with the new data we revisit model assumptions and approximations to obtain an improved version of the interaction model. In addition a phenomenological model for the production of charm particles is implemented as needed for the calculation of prompt lepton fluxes in the energy range of the astrophysical neutrinos recently discovered by IceCube. After giving an overview of the new ideas implemented in Sibyll and discussing how they lead to an improved description of accelerator data, predictions for air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes are presented.
  • This paper presents the studies of the background contribution to the $H \rightarrow 4l$ searches originating from the processes of off-shell (virtual) photon emissions and their conversions into lepton pairs accompanying the production of $Z/ \gamma ^*$-bosons at the LHC. They extend the analyses of the irreducible background presented in the ATLAS and CMS Higgs papers by taking into account the emissions of off-shell photons by parton showers. Including these effects does not change significantly the Higgs-searches background level, provided that the transverse momentum of each of the final-state leptons is restricted to the range of $p_{T, l} > 7$ GeV. In the kinematical region extended towards lower lepton transverse momenta the parton-shower contribution becomes important. A measurement method for pinning down the parton-shower effects is proposed.
  • An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.
  • SIBYLL 2.1 is an event generator for hadron interactions at the highest energies. It is commonly used to analyze and interpret extensive air shower measurements. In light of the first detection of PeV neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration the inclusive fluxes of muons and neutrinos in the atmosphere have become very important. Predicting these fluxes requires understanding of the hadronic production of charmed particles since these contribute significantly to the fluxes at high energy through their prompt decay. We will present an updated version of SIBYLL that has been tuned to describe LHC data and extended to include the production of charmed hadrons.
  • The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic-ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to derive the inclusive differential spectra (yields) of muons, muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos at the surface for energies between 80 GeV and hundreds of PeV. The air shower simulator {\sc corsika} 6.990 was used for showering and propagation of the secondary particles through the atmosphere, employing the established high-energy hadronic interaction models {\sc sibyll} 2.1, {\sc qgsjet-01} and {\sc qgsjet-ii 03}. We show that the performance of the interaction models allows makes it possible to predict the spectra within experimental uncertainties, while {\sc sibyll} generally yields a higher flux at the surface than the qgsjet models. The calculation of the flavor and charge ratios has lead to inconsistent results, mainly influenced by the different representations of the K/$\pi$ ratio within the models. Furthermore, we could quantify systematic uncertainties of atmospheric muon- and neutrino fluxes, associated to the models of the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the interaction models. For most recent parametrizations of the cosmic-ray primary spectrum, atmospheric muons can be determined with an uncertainty smaller than $^{+15}_{-13}$% of the average flux. Uncertainties of the muon- and electron neutrino fluxes can be calculated within an average error of $^{+32}_{-22}$% and $^{+25}_{-19}$%, respectively.