• We present the results of a spectroscopic analysis and spectral energy distribution (SED) modelling of the optical counterpart of the infrared source IRAS 22150+6109. The source was suggested to be as a Herbig Be star located in the star forming region L 1188. Absorption lines in the optical spectrum indicate a spectral type B3, while weak Balmer emission lines reflect the presence of a circumstellar gaseous disc. The star shows no excess radiation in the near-infrared spectral region and a strong excess in the far-infrared that we interpret as radiation from a large disc, whose inner edge is located very far from the star (550 au) and does not attenuate its radiation. We conclude that IRAS 22150+6109 is an intermediate-mass star that is currently undergoing a short pre-main-sequence evolutionary stage.
  • MWC 314 is a bright candidate luminous blue variable that resides in a fairly close binary system, with an orbital period of 60.753$\pm$0.003 d. We observed MWC 314 with a combination of optical spectroscopy, broad-band ground- and space-based photometry, as well as with long baseline, near-infrared interferometry. We have revised the single-lined spectroscopic orbit and explored the photometric variability. The orbital light curve displays two minima each orbit that can be partially explained in terms of the tidal distortion of the primary that occurs around the time of periastron. The emission lines in the system are often double-peaked and stationary in their kinematics, indicative of a circumbinary disc. We find that the stellar wind or circumbinary disc is partially resolved in the K\prime-band with the longest baselines of the CHARA Array. From this analysis, we provide a simple, qualitative model in an attempt to explain the observations. From the assumption of Roche Lobe overflow and tidal synchronisation at periastron, we estimate the component masses to be M1 $\approx 5$ M$_\odot$ and M2$\approx 15$ M$_\odot$, which indicates a mass of the LBV that is extremely low. In addition to the orbital modulation, we discovered two pulsational modes with the MOST satellite. These modes are easily supported by a low-mass hydrogen-poor star, but cannot be easily supported by a star with the parameters of an LBV. The combination of these results provides evidence that the primary star was likely never a normal LBV, but rather is the product of binary interactions. As such, this system presents opportunities for studying mass-transfer and binary evolution with many observational techniques.
  • FS CMa type stars are a recently described group of objects with the B[e] phenomenon that exhibit strong emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses. In this paper we report the first attempt for a detailed modeling of IRAS 00470+6429, for which we have the best set of observations. Our modeling is based on two key assumptions: the star has a main-sequence luminosity for its spectral type (B2) and the circumstellar envelope is bimodal, composed of a slowly outflowing disk-like wind and a fast polar wind. Both outflows are assumed to be purely radial. We adopt a novel approach to describe the dust formation site in the wind that employs timescale arguments for grain condensation and a self-consistent solution for the dust destruction surface. With the above assumptions we were able to reproduce satisfactorily many observational properties of IRAS 00470+6429, including the H line profiles and the overall shape of the spectral energy distribution. Our adopted recipe for dust formation proved successful in reproducing the correct amount of dust formed in the circumstellar envelope. Possible shortcomings of our model, as well as suggestions for future improvements, are discussed.
  • We study the IR emission from flared disks with and without additional optically thin halos. Flux calculations of a flared disk in vacuum can be considered a special case of the more general family of models in which the disk is imbedded in an optically thin halo. In the absence of such halo, flux measurements can never rule out its existence because the disk flaring surface defines a mathematically equivalent halo that produces the exact same flux at all IR wavelengths. When a flared disk with height H at its outer radius R is imbedded in a halo whose optical depth at visual wavelengths is \tau\sub{halo}, the system IR flux is dominated by the halo whenever \tau\sub{halo} > (1/4)H/R. Even when its optical depth is much smaller, the halo can still have a significant effect on the disk temperature profile. Imaging is the only way to rule out the existence of a potential halo, and we identify a decisive test that extracts a signature unique to flared disks from imaging observations.
  • The spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric variability of the peculiar variable V838 Monocerotis during the brighter phases of its multiple outbursts in 2002 is presented. Significant line profile variability of H$\alpha$ and Si II 6347.10\AA & 6371.36\AA occurred in spectra obtained between 2002 February 5 and 2002 March 14, and a unique secondary absorption component was observed near the end of this time period. Our observations also suggest that multiple shifts in ionization states occurred during the outbursts. Spectropolarimetric observations reveal that V838 Mon exhibited both intrinsic and interstellar polarization components during the initial stages of the second outburst, indicating the presence of an asymmetric geometry; however, the intrinsic component had significantly declined by February 14. We determine the interstellar polarization to be $P_{max} = 2.746 \pm 0.011 %$, $\lambda_{max} = 5790 \pm 37\AA$, $PA = 153.43 \pm 0.12 ^{\circ} $, and we find the integrated intrinsic V band polarization on February 5 to be $P = 0.983 \pm 0.012 %$ at a position angle of $127.0 \pm 0.5^{\circ}$. The implications of these observations for the nature of V838 Monocerotis, its distance, and its ejecta are discussed.
  • We present the results of recent multicolor photometric and high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the bright Be star Pi Aquarii. Observational data collected from the literature were used to study the star's variations over the last four decades. The star is identified with the IR sources F22227+0107 in the IRAS Faint Point Source catalog and MSX5_G066.0066-44.7392 in the MSX catalog. The variations in near-IR brightness of Pi Aqr are found to be among the largest reported for Be stars. Since 1996, the star has shown only weak signs of circumstellar emission, which has allowed us to refine the fundamental stellar parameters: A_V=0.15 mag., T_eff=24000K, log g=3.9, and M_V=-2.95 mag. A weak emission component of the H-alpha line has been detected during the recent quasi-normal star phase. From analysis of the H-alpha line profiles, we find anti-phased radial velocity variations of the emission component and the photospheric absorption, with a period of 84.1 days and semi-amplitudes of 101.4 and 16.7 km/s, respectively. This result suggests that Pi Aqr may be a binary system consisting of stars with masses of M_1 sin^{3}i = 12.4 M_sun, M_2 sin^{3}i = 2.0 M_sun. We also estimate the orbital inclination angle to be between 50 and 75 degrees. We suggest that the photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric variations observed during the second half of the 20th century may be due to variable mass transfer between the binary components.