• Motivated by the recent detection of the gravitational wave signal emitted by a binary neutron star merger, we analyse the possible impact of dark matter on such signals. We show that dark matter cores in merging neutron stars may yield an observable supplementary peak in the gravitational wave power spectral density following the merger, which could be distinguished from the features produced by the neutron components.
  • The EDGES experiment has recently measured an anomalous global 21-cm spectrum due to hydrogen absorptions at redshifts of about $z\sim 17$. Model independently, the unusually low temperature of baryons probed by this observable sets strong constraints on any physical process that transfers energy into the baryonic environment at such redshifts. Here we make use of the 21-cm spectrum to derive bounds on the energy injection due to a possible population of ${\cal O}(1-100) M_\odot$ primordial black holes, which induce a wide spectrum of radiation during the accretion of the surrounding gas. After calculating the total radiative intensity of a primordial black hole population, we estimate the amount of heat and ionisations produced in the baryonic gas and compute the resulting thermal history of the Universe with a modified version of RECFAST code. Finally, by imposing that the temperature of the gas at $z\sim 17$ does not exceed the indications of EDGES, we constrain the possible abundance of primordial black holes. Depending on uncertainties related to the accretion model, we find that ${\cal O}(10) M_\odot$ primordial black holes can only contribute to a fraction $f_{\rm PBH}<(1-10^{-2})$ of the total dark matter abundance.
  • The recently claimed anomaly in the measurement of the 21 cm hydrogen absorption signal by EDGES at $z\sim 17$, if cosmological, requires the existence of new physics. The possible attempts to resolve the anomaly rely on either (i) cooling the hydrogen gas via new dark matter-hydrogen interactions or (ii) modifying the soft photon background beyond the standard CMB one, as possibly suggested also by the ARCADE~2 excess. We argue that solutions belonging to the first class are generally in tension with cosmological dark matter probes once simple dark sector models are considered. Therefore, we propose soft photon emission by light dark matter as a natural solution to the 21 cm anomaly, studying a few realizations of this scenario. We find that the signal singles out a photophilic dark matter candidate characterised by an enhanced collective decay mechanism, such as axion mini-clusters.
  • We present an extension of the Standard Model, containing a fermion dark matter candidate and two real scalar singlets, where the observed dark matter abundance is produced via freeze-out before the electroweak phase transition. We show that in this case the dark matter annihilation channels determining its freeze-out are different from those producing indirect detection signal. We present a benchmark model where the indirect annihilation cross-section is significantly larger than the freeze-out one. The model also has a gravitational wave signature due to the first order electroweak phase transition.
  • Dark plasma is an intriguing form of self-interacting dark matter with an effective fluid-like behavior, which is well motivated by various theoretical particle physics models. We aim to find an explanation for an isolated mass clump in the Abell 520 system, which cannot be explained by traditional models of dark matter, but has been detected in weak lensing observations. We performed N-body smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy cluster collisions with a two component model of dark matter, which is assumed to consist of a predominant non-interacting dark matter component and a 10-40 percent mass fraction of dark plasma. The mass of a possible dark clump was calculated for each simulation in a parameter scan over the underlying model parameters. In two higher resolution simulations shock-waves and Mach cones were observed to form in the dark plasma halos. By choosing suitable simulation parameters, the observed distributions of dark matter in both the Bullet Cluster (1E 0657-558) and Abell 520 (MS 0451.5+0250) can be qualitatively reproduced.
  • Coy dark matter is an effective scheme in which a fermionic dark matter candidate interacts with the Standard Model fermions via a pseudoscalar mediator. This simple setup avoids the strong constraints posed by direct detection experiments in a natural way and explains, on top of the observed dark matter relic abundance, the spatially extended gamma-ray excess recently detected at the Galactic Center. In this Letter we study the phenomenology of coy dark matter accounting for a novel signature of the model: the diphoton annihilation signal induced by the Standard Model fermions at the loop level. By challenging the model with the observations of spheroidal dwarf satellite galaxies and the results of gamma-ray line searches obtained by the Fermi LAT experiment, we assess its compatibility with the measured dark matter relic abundance and the Galactic Center excesses. We show that despite the gamma-ray line constraint rules out a significant fraction of the considered parameter space, the region connected to the observed Galactic Center excess remains currently viable. Nevertheless, we find that next-generation experiments such as DAMPE, HERD and GAMMA-400 have the potential to probe exhaustively this elusive scenario.
  • The small background and the sensitivity to charged particles via a leading order loop coupling make the diphoton channel a privileged experimental test for new physics models. We propose a simple archetypal scenario to generate a sharp di-photon resonance as a result of threshold enhancements in the effective coupling between a heavy pseudoscalar particle and new vector-like leptons. We therefore study three different scenarios consistent with the current experimental limits and deviating from the Standard Model at the 2~$\sigma$ level. The model also introduces a natural dark matter candidate able to match the observed dark matter abundance and comfortably respect the current direct detection constraints.
  • Motivated by the recent indications for a 750 GeV resonance in the di-photon final state at the LHC, in this work we analyse the compatibility of the excess with the broad photon excess detected at the Galactic Centre. Intriguingly, by analysing the parameter space of an effective models where a 750 GeV pseudoscalar particles mediates the interaction between the Standard Model and a scalar dark sector, we prove the compatibility of the two signals. We show, however, that the LHC mono-jet searches and the Fermi LAT measurements strongly limit the viable parameter space. We comment on the possible impact of cosmic antiproton flux measurement by the AMS-02 experiment.
  • We consider an extension of the lepto-specific 2HDM with an extra singlet $S$ as a dark matter candidate. Taking into account theoretical and experimental constraints, we investigate the possibility to address both the $\gamma$-ray excess detected at the Galactic centre and the discrepancy between the Standard Model prediction and experimental results of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Our analyses reveal that the $SS \to \tau^+ \tau^-$ and $SS \to b \bar b$ channels reproduce the Galactic centre excess, with an emerging dark matter candidate which complies with the bounds from direct detection experiments, measurements of the Higgs boson invisible decay width and observations of the dark matter relic abundance. Addressing the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon imposes further strong constraints on the model. Remarkably, under these conditions, the $SS \to b \bar b$ channel still allows for the fitting of the Galactic centre. We also comment on a scenario allowed by the model where the $SS \to \tau^+ \tau^-$ and $SS \to b \bar b$ channels have comparable branching ratios, which possibly yield an improved fitting of the Galactic centre excess.
  • We describe how known matter effects within a well-motivated particle physics framework can explain the dark energy component of the Universe. By considering a cold gas of particles which interact via a vector mediator, we show that there exists a regime where the gas reproduces the dynamics of dark energy. In this regime the screening mass of the mediator is proportional to the number density of the gas, hence we refer to this phenomenon as "the adaptive screening mechanism". As an example, we argue that such screening mass can result from strong localization of the vector mediators. The proposed dark energy mechanism could be experimentally verified through cosmological observations by the Euclid experiment, as well as by studying properties of dark photons and sterile neutrinos.
  • We provide ingredients and recipes for computing neutrino signals of TeV-scale Dark Matter annihilations in the Sun. For each annihilation channel and DM mass we present the energy spectra of neutrinos at production, including: state-of-the-art energy losses of primary particles in solar matter, secondary neutrinos, electroweak radiation. We then present the spectra after propagation to the Earth, including (vacuum and matter) flavor oscillations and interactions in solar matter. We also provide a numerical computation of the capture rate of DM particles in the Sun. These results are available in numerical form.
  • Coy Dark Matter removes the tension between the traditional WIMP paradigm of Dark Matter and the latest exclusion bounds from direct detection experiments. In this paper we present a leptophilic Coy Dark Matter model that, on top of explaining the spatially extended 1-5 GeV $\gamma$-ray excess detected at the Galactic Center, reconciles the measured anomalous magnetic moment of muon with the corresponding Standard Model prediction. The annihilation channel of DM is $\chi\chi \to \tau\bar\tau$ with the DM mass $m_\chi = 9.43\,(^{+.063}_{-0.52}\,{\rm stat.})\,(\pm 1.2 \,{\rm sys.})$ GeV given by best-fit of the $\gamma$-ray excess. Fitting the measured anomalous magnetic moment of the muon requires instead a pseudoscalar mediator with a minimal mass $m_a = 12^{+7}_{-3}$ GeV.
  • We search for spectral features in Fermi-LAT gamma-rays coming from regions corresponding to eighteen brightest nearby galaxy clusters determined by the magnitude of their signal line-of-site integrals. We observe a double peak-like excess over the diffuse power-law background at photon energies 110 GeV and 130 GeV with the global statistical significance up to 3.6\sigma, confirming independently earlier claims of the same excess from Galactic centre. Interpreting this result as a signal of dark matter annihilations to two monochromatic photon channels in galaxy cluster haloes, and fixing the annihilation cross section from the Galactic centre data, we determine the annihilation boost factor due to dark matter subhaloes from data. Our results contribute to discrimination of the dark matter annihilations from astrophysical processes and from systematic detector effects as the possible explanations to the Fermi-LAT excess.
  • We analyze publicly available Fermi-LAT high-energy gamma-ray data and confirm the existence of clear spectral feature peaked at E=130GeV. Scanning over the Galaxy we identify several disconnected regions where the observed excess originates from. Our best optimized fit is obtained for the central region of Galaxy with a clear peak at 130GeV with local statistical significance 4.5 sigma. The observed excess is not correlated with Fermi bubbles. We compute the photon spectra induced by dark matter annihilations into two and four standard model particles, the latter via two light intermediate states, and fit the spectra with data. Since our fits indicate sharper and higher signal peak than in the previous works, data favors dark matter direct two-body annihilation channels into photons or other channels giving only line-like spectra. If Einasto halo profile correctly predicts the central cusp of Galaxy, dark matter annihilation cross-section to two photons is of order ten percent of the standard thermal freeze-out cross-section. The large dark matter two-body annihilation cross-section to photons may signal a new resonance that should be searched for at the CERN LHC experiments.
  • We look for possible spectral features and systematic effects in Fermi-LAT publicly available high-energy gamma-ray data by studying photons from the Galactic centre, nearby galaxy clusters, nearby brightest galaxies, AGNs, unassociated sources, hydrogen clouds and Earth Limb. Apart from already known 130 GeV gamma-ray excesses from the first two sources, we find no new statistically significant signal from others. Much of our effort goes to studying Earth Limb photons. In the energy range 30 GeV to 200 GeV the Earth Limb gamma-ray spectrum follows power-law with spectral index 2.87\pm 0.04 at 95 % CL, in a good agreement with the PAMELA measurement of cosmic ray proton spectral index between 2.82-2.85, confirming the physical origin of the Limb gamma-rays. In small subsets of Earth Limb data with small photon incidence angle it is possible to obtain spectral features at different energies, including at 130 GeV, but determination of background, thus their significances, has large uncertainties in those cases. We observe systematic 2\sigma level differences in the Earth Limb spectra of gamma-rays with small and large incidence angles. The behaviour of those spectral features as well as background indicates that they are likely statistical fluctuations.
  • We provide ingredients and recipes for computing signals of TeV-scale Dark Matter annihilations and decays in the Galaxy and beyond. For each DM channel, we present the energy spectra of electrons and positrons, antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma rays, neutrinos and antineutrinos e, mu, tau at production, computed by high-statistics simulations. We estimate the Monte Carlo uncertainty by comparing the results yielded by the Pythia and Herwig event generators. We then provide the propagation functions for charged particles in the Galaxy, for several DM distribution profiles and sets of propagation parameters. Propagation of electrons and positrons is performed with an improved semi-analytic method that takes into account position-dependent energy losses in the Milky Way. Using such propagation functions, we compute the energy spectra of electrons and positrons, antiprotons and antideuterons at the location of the Earth. We then present the gamma ray fluxes, both from prompt emission and from Inverse Compton scattering in the galactic halo. Finally, we provide the spectra of extragalactic gamma rays. All results are available in numerical form and ready to be consumed.
  • We search for the presence of double gamma-ray line from unassociated Fermi-LAT sources including detailed Monte Carlo simulations to study its global statistical significance. Applying the Su & Finkbeiner selection criteria for high-energy photons we obtain a similar excess over the power-law background from 12 unassociated sources. However, the Fermi-LAT energy resolution and the present low statistics does not allow to distinguish a double peak from a single one with any meaningful statistical significance. We study the statistical significance of the fit to data with Monte Carlo simulations and show that the fit agrees almost perfectly with the expectations from random scan over the sky. We conclude that the claimed high-energy gamma-ray excess over the power-law background from unassociated sources is nothing but an artifact of the applied selection criteria and no preference to any excess can be claimed with the present statistics.
  • (Context) We calculate constraints from current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements on annihilating dark matter (DM) with masses below the electroweak scale: m_{DM}=5-100 GeV. In particular, we focus our attention on the lower end of this mass range, as DM particles with masses m_{DM} ~ 10 GeV have been recently claimed to be consistent with the CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA results, while also providing viable DM candidates to explain the measurements of Fermi and WMAP haze. (Aims) We study the model (in)dependence of CMB spectrum on particle physics DM models, large scale structure formation and cosmological uncertainties. We attempt to find a simple and practical recipe for estimating current and future CMB bounds on a broad class of DM annihilation models. (Results) We show that in the studied DM mass range the CMB signal of DM annihilations is independent of the details of large scale structure formation, distribution and profile of DM halos and other cosmological uncertainties. All particle physics models of DM annihilation can be described with only one parameter, the fraction of energy carried away by neutrinos in DM annihilation. As the main result we provide a simple and rather generic fitting formula for calculating CMB constraints on the annihilation cross section of light WIMPs. We show that thermal relic DM in the CoGeNT, DAMA favoured mass range is in a serious conflict with present CMB data for the annihilation channels with few neutrinos, and will definitely be tested by the Planck mission for all possible DM annihilation channels. Also, our findings strongly disfavor the claim that thermal relic DM annihilations with m_{DM} ~ 10 GeV and $<sigma_av> ~ 9x10^{-25} cm^{3}s^{-1} could be a cause for Fermi and WMAP haze.
  • We study in detail the model by Isidori and Kamenik that is claimed to explain the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at Tevatron, provide GeV-scale dark matter (DM), and possibly improve the agreement between data and theory in Tevatron W+jj events. We compute the DM thermal relic density, the spin-independent DM-nucleon scattering cross section, and the cosmic microwave background constraints on both Dirac and Majorana neutralino DM in the parameter space that explains the top asymmetry. A stable light neutralino is not allowed unless the local DM density is 3-4 times smaller than expected, in which case Dirac DM with mass around 3 GeV may be possible, to be tested by the Planck mission. The model predicts a too broad excess in the dijet distribution and a strong modification of the missing E_T distribution in W+jj events.
  • We analyze the recently published Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements in the context of leptonically annihilating or decaying dark matter (DM) with the aim to explain simultaneously the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and the PAMELA, Fermi and HESS (PFH) anomalous $e^\pm$ data. Five different DM annihilation/decay channels $2e$, $2\mu$, $2\tau$, $4e$, or $4\mu$ (the latter two via an intermediate light particle $\phi$) are generated with PYTHIA. We calculate both the Galactic and extragalactic prompt and inverse Compton (IC) contributions to the resulting gamma-ray spectra. To find the Galactic IC spectra we use the interstellar radiation field model from the latest release of GALPROP. For the extragalactic signal we show that the amplitude of the prompt gamma-emission is very sensitive to the assumed model for the extragalactic background light. For our Galaxy we use the Einasto, NFW and Isothermal DM density profiles and include the effects of DM substructure assuming a simple subhalo model. Our calculations show that for the annihilating DM the extragalactic gamma-ray signal can dominate only if rather extreme power-law concentration-mass relation $C(M)$ is used, while more realistic $C(M)$ relations make the extragalactic component comparable or subdominant to the Galactic signal. For the decaying DM the Galactic signal always exceeds the extragalactic one. In the case of annihilating DM the PFH favored parameters can be ruled out only if power-law $C(M)$ relation is assumed. For DM decaying into $2\mu$ or $4\mu$ the PFH favored DM parameters are not in conflict with the Fermi gamma-ray data. We find that, due to the (almost) featureless Galactic IC spectrum and the DM halo substructure, annihilating DM may give a good simultaneous fit to the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and to the PFH $e^\pm$ data without being in clear conflict with the other Fermi-LAT gamma-ray measurements.
  • The PAMELA, Fermi and HESS experiments (PFH) have shown anomalous excesses in the cosmic positron and electron fluxes. A very exciting possibility is that those excesses are due to annihilating dark matter (DM). In this paper we calculate constraints on leptonically annihilating DM using observational data on diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background and measurements of the optical depth to the last-scattering surface, and compare those with the PFH favored region in the m_{DM} - <\sigma_A v> plane. Having specified the detailed form of the energy input with PYTHIA Monte Carlo tools we solve the radiative transfer equation which allows us to determine the amount of energy being absorbed by the cosmic medium and also the amount left over for the diffuse gamma background. We find that the constraints from the optical depth measurements are able to rule out the PFH favored region fully for the \tau^{-}+\tau^{+} annihilation channel and almost fully for the \mu^{-}+\mu^{+} annihilation channel. It turns out that those constraints are quite robust with almost no dependence on low redshift clustering boost. The constraints from the gamma-ray background are sensitive to the assumed halo concentration model and, for the power law model, rule out the PFH favored region for all leptonic annihilation channels. We also find that it is possible to have models that fully ionize the Universe at low redshifts. However, those models produce too large free electron fractions at z > ~100 and are in conflict with the optical depth measurements. Also, the magnitude of the annihilation cross-section in those cases is larger than suggested by the PFH data.
  • We study effects of unparticle physics on muon g-2 and LFV tau decay processes. LFV interactions between the Standard Model sector and unparticles can explain the difference of experimental value of muon g-2 from the Standard Model prediction. While the same couplings generate LFV tau decay, we found that LFV coupling can be of O(0.1 ... 1) without conflict with experimental bounds of LFV tau decay if the scaling dimension of unparticle operator d_{U} > 1.6.
  • We calculate the running of low-energy neutrino parameters from the bottom up, parameterizing the unknown seesaw parameters in terms of the dominance matrix $R$. We find significant running only if the $R$ matrix is non-trivial and the light-neutrino masses are moderately degenerate. If the light-neutrino masses are very hierarchical, the quark-lepton complementarity relation $\theta_c + \theta_{12} = \pi/4$ is quite stable, but $\theta_{13,23}$ may run beyond their likely future experimental errors. The running of the oscillation phase $\delta$ is enhanced by the smallness of $\theta_{13}$, and jumps in the mixing angles occur in cases where the light-neutrino mass eigenstates cross.
  • We present first scientific results, technical details and recent developments in the Estonian Grid. Ideas and concepts behind Grid technology are described. We mention some most crucial parts of a Grid system, as well as some unique possibilities in the Estonian situation. Scientific applications currently running on Estonian Grid are listed. We discuss the first scientific computations and results the Estonian Grid. The computations show that the middleware is well chosen and the Estonian Grid has remarkable stability and scalability. The authors present the collected results and experiences of the development of the Estonian Grid and add some ideas of the near future of the Estonian Grid.