• The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) has recently been found to harbour more than two hundred per cent increase of its known cluster population. We provide here with solid evidence that such an unprecedented number of clusters could be largely overestimated. On the one hand, the fully-automatic procedure used to identify such an enormous cluster candidate sample did not recover ~ 50 per cent, in average, of the known relatively bright clusters located in the SMC main body. On the other hand, the number of new cluster candidates per time unit as a function of time results noticeably different to the intrinsic SMC cluster frequency (CF), which should not be the case if these new detections were genuine physical systems. We additionally found that the SMC CF varies spatially, in such a way that it resembles an outside-in process coupled with the effects of a relatively recent interaction with the Large Magellanic Cloud. By assuming that clusters and field stars share the same formation history, we showed for the first time that the cluster dissolution rate also depends on the position in the galaxy. The cluster dissolution results higher as the concentration of galaxy mass increases or external tidal forces are present.
  • We present result from DECam SDSS i PSF photometry of the radial stellar density profiles of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) old globular clusters (GCs) NGC1841, 2210, Hodge11 and Reticulum, which extent out of ~ 380 pc from their centres. We found that the studied LMC GCs would not seem to exhibit extended stellar structures like those frequently seen in Galactic globular clusters (GGCs), which could suggest that the LMC gravitational field has not been efficient in stripping stars off its GCs. The concentration parameter $c$ of the studied LMC GCs would seem to depend on both the internal dynamics and the position of the GC in the galaxy, as the Jacobi-to-cluster radius ratio does. When comparing them with GGCs with similar masses and age-to-half-mass relaxation times ratios, the studied LMC GCs would seem to have the smallest concentration parameter $c$ values and step aside of the GGC relationship in the core-to-half-light radius ratio ($r_c/r_h$) vs half-light-to-tidal radius ratio ($r_h/r_t$) plane. These observational differences could suggest that other conditions, like the gravitational potential of the host galaxy and/or the orbital parameters (e.g. halo- or disc- like orbits), could play some role in the evolution of the structural parameters of these two GC populations.
  • We present results from 2MASS JKs photometry on the physical reality of recently reported globular cluster (GC) candidates in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. We relied our analysis on photometric membership probabilities that allowed us to distinguish real stellar aggregates from the composite field star population. When building colour-magnitude diagrams and stellar density maps for stars at different membership probability levels, the genuine GC candidate populations are clearly highlighted. We then used the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) as distance estimator, resulting heliocentric distances that place many of the objects in regions near of the MW bulge where no GC had been previously recognised. Some few GC candidates resulted to be MW halo/disc objects.Metallicities estimated from the standard RGB method are in agreement with the values expected according to the position of the GC candidates in the Galaxy. We finally derived from the first time their structural parameters. We found that the studied objects have core, half-light and tidal radii in the ranges spanned by the population of known MW GCs. Their internal dynamical evolutionary stages will be described properly when their masses are estimated.
  • The number of star clusters that populate the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) at deprojected distances < 4 deg has been recently found to be nearly double the known size of the system. Because of the unprecedented consequences of this outcome in our knowledge of the LMC cluster formation and dissolution histories, we closely revisited such a compilation of objects and found that only ~ 35 per cent of the previously known catalogued clusters has been included. The remaining entries are likely related to stellar overdensities of the LMC composite star field, because there is a remarkable enhancement of objects with assigned ages older than log(t yr-1) ~ 9.4, which contrasts with the existence of the LMC cluster age gap; the assumption of a cluster formation rate similar to that of the LMC star field does not help to conciliate so large amount of clusters either; and nearly 50 per cent of them come from cluster search procedures known to produce more than 90 per cent of false detections. The lack of further analyses to confirm the physical reality as genuine star clusters of the identified overdensities also glooms those results. We support that the actual size of the LMC main body cluster population is close to that previously known.
  • We studied the spatial distribution of young and old stellar populations along the western half part of the minor axis of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using Washington MT1 photometry of selected fields, which span a deprojected distance range from the LMC bar centre out to ~ 31.6 kpc. We found that both stellar populations share a mean LMC limiting radius of 8.9+-0.4 kpc; old populations are three times more dense that young populations at that LMC limit. When comparing this result with recent values for the LMC extension due to north, the old populations resulted significantly more elongated than the young ones. Bearing in mind previous claims that the elongation of the outermost LMC regions may be due to the tidal effects of the Milky Way (MW), our findings suggest that such a tidal interaction should not have taken place recently. The existence of young populations in the outermost western regions also supports previous results about ram pressure stripping effects of the LMC gaseous disc due to the motion of the LMC in the MW halo.
  • Star formation is a hierarchical process, forming young stellar structures of star clusters, associations, and complexes over a wide scale range. The star-forming complex in the bar region of the Large Magellanic Cloud is investigated with upper main-sequence stars observed by the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. The upper main-sequence stars exhibit highly non-uniform distributions. Young stellar structures inside the complex are identified from the stellar density map as density enhancements of different significance levels. We find that these structures are hierarchically organized such that larger, lower-density structures contain one or several smaller, higher-density ones. They follow power-law size and mass distributions as well as a lognormal surface density distribution. All these results support a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by turbulence. The temporal evolution of young stellar structures is explored by using subsamples of upper main-sequence stars with different magnitude and age ranges. While the youngest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~7.2, contains most substructure, progressively older ones are less and less substructured. The oldest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~8.0, is almost indistinguishable from a uniform distribution on spatial scales of 30--300~pc, suggesting that the young stellar structures are completely dispersed on a timescale of $\sim$100~Myr. These results are consistent with the characteristics of the 30~Doradus complex and the entire Large Magellanic Cloud, suggesting no significant environmental effects. We further point out that the fractal dimension may be method-dependent for stellar samples with significant age spreads.
  • We report on observational evidence of an extra-tidal clumpy structure around NGC 288 from an homogeneous coverage of a large area with the Pan-STARRS PS1 database. The extra-tidal star population has been disentangled from that of the Milky Way field by using a cleaning technique that successfully reproduced the stellar density, luminosity function and colour distributions of MW field stars. We have produced the cluster stellar density radial profile and a stellar density map from independent approaches, from which we found results in excellent agreement : the feature extends up to 3.5 times the cluster tidal radius. Previous works based on shallower photometric data sets have speculated on the existence of several long tidal tails, similar to that found in Pal 5. The present outcome shows that NGC 288 could hardly have such tails, but favours the notion that interactions with the MW tidal field has been a relatively inefficient process for stripping stars off the cluster. These results point to the need of a renewed overall study of the external regions of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) in order to reliably characterise them. Hence, it will be possible to investigate whether there is any connection between detected tidal tails, extra-tidal stellar populations, extent diffuse halo-like structures with the GGCs' dynamical histories in the Galaxy.
  • We analysed Washington $CMT_1$ photometry of star clusters located along the minor axis of the LMC, from the LMC optical centre up to $\sim$ 39 degrees outwards to the North-West. The data base was exploited in order to search for new star cluster candidates, to produce cluster CMDs cleaned from field star contamination and to derive age estimates for a statistically complete cluster sample. We confirmed that 146 star cluster candidates are genuine physical systems, and concluded that an overall $\sim$ 30 per cent of catalogued clusters in the surveyed regions are unlikely to be true physical systems. We did not find any new cluster candidates in the outskirts of the LMC (deprojected distance $\ge$ 8 degrees). The derived ages of the studied clusters are in the range 7.2 < log($t$ yr$^{-1}$) $\le$ 9.4, with the sole exception of the globular cluster NGC\,1786 (log($t$ yr$^{-1}$) = 10.10). We also calculated the cluster frequency for each region, from which we confirmed previously proposed outside-in formation scenarios. In addition, we found that the outer LMC fields show a sudden episode of cluster formation (log($t$ yr$^{-1}$) $\sim$ 7.8-7.9) that continued until log($t$ yr$^{-1}$) $\sim$ 7.3 only in the outermost LMC region. We link these features to the first pericentre passage of the LMC to the MW, which could have triggered cluster formation due to ram pressure interaction between the LMC and MW halo.
  • We constructed for the first time a stellar density profile of 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc) out of $\sim$ 5.5 times its tidal radius ($r_t$) using high-quality deep $BV$ photometry. After carefully considering the influence of photometric errors, and Milky Way and Small Magellanic Cloud composite stellar population contamination, we found that the cluster stellar density profile reaches a nearly constant value from $\sim$ 1.7$r_t$ outwards, which does not depend on the direction from the cluster's center considered. These results visibly contrast with recent distinct theoretical predictions on the existence of tidal tails or on a density profile that falls as $r^{-4}$ at large distances, and with observational outcomes of a clumpy structure as well. Our results suggest that the envelope of 47 Tuc is a halo- like nearly constant low density structure.
  • The "VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic System" (VMC) is collecting deep Ks-band time-series photometry of pulsating stars hosted by the two Magellanic Clouds and their connecting Bridge. Here we present YJKs light curves for a sample of 717 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) Classical Cepheids (CCs). These data, complemented with our previous results and V magnitude from literature, allowed us to construct a variety of period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit relationships, valid for Fundamental, First and Second Overtone pulsators. These relations provide accurate individual distances to CCs in the SMC over an area of more than 40 sq. deg. Adopting literature relations, we estimated ages and metallicities for the majority of the investigated pulsators, finding that: i) the age distribution is bimodal, with two peaks at 120+-10 and 220+-10 Myr; ii) the more metal-rich CCs appear to be located closer to the centre of the galaxy. Our results show that the three-dimensional distribution of the CCs in the SMC, is not planar but heavily elongated for more than 25-30 kpc approximately in the east/north-east towards south-west direction. The young and old CCs in the SMC show a different geometric distribution. Our data support the current theoretical scenario predicting a close encounter or a direct collision between the Clouds some 200 Myr ago and confirm the presence of a Counter-Bridge predicted by some models. The high precision three-dimensional distribution of young stars presented in this paper provides a new testbed for future models exploring the formation and evolution of the Magellanic System.
  • We report results on star clusters located in the South-Eastern half of the Large Magellanic (LMC) bar from Washington $CT_1$ photometry. Using appropriate kernel density estimators we detected 73 star cluster candidates, three of which do not show any detectable trace of star cluster sequences in their colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). We did not detect other 38 previously catalogued clusters, which could not be recognized when visually inspecting the $C$ and $T_1$ images either; the distribution of stars in their respective fields do not resemble that of an stellar aggregate. They represent $\sim$ 33 per cent of all catalogued objects located within the analysed LMC bar field. From matching theoretical isochrones to the cluster CMDs cleaned from field star contamination, we derived ages in the range 7.2 < log($t$ yr$^{-1}$) < 10.1. As far as we are aware, this is the first time homogeneous age estimates based on resolved stellar photometry are obtained for most of the studied clusters. We built the cluster frequency (CF) for the surveyed area, and found that the major star cluster formation activity has taken place during the period log($t$ yr$^{-1}$) $\sim$ 8.0 -- 9.0. Since $\sim$ 100 Myr ago, clusters have been formed during few bursting formation episodes. When comparing the observed CF to that recovered from the star formation rate we found noticeable differences, which suggests that field star and star cluster formation histories could have been significantly different.
  • We report the serendipitous young Large Magellanic Cloud cluster, NGC 1971, exhibits an extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) possibly originated by mostly a real age spread. We used CT1 Washington photometry to produce a colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) with the fiducial cluster features. From its eMSTO, we estimated an age spread of ~ 170 Myr (observed age range 100-280 Myr), once observational errors, stellar binarity, overall metalicity variations and stellar rotation effects were subtracted in quadrature from the observed age width.
  • The ongoing surveys of galaxies and those for the next generation of telescopes will demand the execution of high-CPU consuming machine codes for recovering detailed star formation histories (SFHs) and hence age-metallicity relationships (AMRs). We present here an expeditive method which provides quick-look AMRs on the basis of representative ages and metallicities obtained from colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) analyses. We have tested its perfomance by generating synthetic CMDs for a wide variety of galaxy SFHs. The representative AMRs turn out to be reliable down to a magnitude limit with a photometric completeness factor higher than $\sim$ 85 per cent, and trace the chemical evolution history for any stellar population (represented by a mean age and an intrinsic age spread) with a total mass within ~ 40 per cent of the more massive stellar population in the galaxy.
  • The census of star clusters in the inner Milky Way is incomplete because of extinction and crowding. We embarked on a program to expand the star cluster list in the direction of the inner Milky Way using deep stacks of Ks-band images from the VISTA Variables in Via Lactea (VVV) Survey. We applied an automated two-step procedure to the point-source catalog derived from the deep Ks images: first, we identified overdensities of stars, and then we selected only candidate clusters with probable member stars that match an isochrone with a certain age, distance, and extinction on the color-magnitude diagram. This pilot project only investigates the cluster population in part of one VVV tile, that is, b201. We identified nine cluster candidates and estimated their parameters. The new candidates are compact with a typical radius on the sky of ~0.2--0.4 arcmin (~0.4-1.6 pc at their estimated distances). They are located at distances of ~5-14 kpc from the Sun and are subject to moderate extinction of E(B-V)=0.4-1.0 mag. They are sparse, probably evolved, with typical ages log(t/1 yr)~9. Based on the locations of the objects inside the Milky Way, we conclude that one of these objects is probably associated with the disk or halo and the remaining objects are associated with the bulge or the halo. The cluster candidates reported here push the VVV Survey cluster detection to the limit. These new objects demonstrate that the VVV survey has the potential to identify thousands of additional cluster candidates. The sub-arcsec angular resolution nd the near-infrared wavelength regimen give it a critical advantage over other surveys.
  • Aims. To produce an homogeneous catalog of astrophysical parameters of 239 resolved star clusters located in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, observed in the Washington photometric system. Methods. The cluster sample was processed with the recently introduced Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis ($\texttt{ASteCA}$) package, which ensures both an automatized and a fully reproducible treatment, together with a statistically based analysis of their fundamental parameters and associated uncertainties. The fundamental parameters determined with this tool for each cluster, via a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis, are: metallicity, age, reddening, distance modulus, and total mass. Results. We generated an homogeneous catalog of structural and fundamental parameters for the studied cluster sample, and performed a detailed internal error analysis along with a thorough comparison with values taken from twenty-six published articles. We studied the distribution of cluster fundamental parameters in both Clouds, and obtained their age-metallicity relationships. Conclusions. The $\texttt{ASteCA}$ package can be applied to an unsupervised determination of fundamental cluster parameters; a task of increasing relevance as more data becomes available through upcoming surveys.
  • We study the luminosity function of intermediate-age red-clump stars using deep, near-infrared photometric data covering $\sim$ 20 deg$^2$ located throughout the central part of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), comprising the main body and the galaxy's eastern wing, based on observations obtained with the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds (VMC). We identified regions which show a foreground population ($\sim$11.8 $\pm$ 2.0 kpc in front of the main body) in the form of a distance bimodality in the red-clump distribution. The most likely explanation for the origin of this feature is tidal stripping from the SMC rather than the extended stellar haloes of the Magellanic Clouds and/or tidally stripped stars from the Large Magellanic Cloud. The homogeneous and continuous VMC data trace this feature in the direction of the Magellanic Bridge and, particularly, identify (for the first time) the inner region ($\sim$ 2 -- 2.5 kpc from the centre) from where the signatures of interactions start becoming evident. This result provides observational evidence of the formation of the Magellanic Bridge from tidally stripped material from the SMC.
  • We present UBVRI and CT1T2 photometry for fifteen catalogued open clusters of relative high brightness and compact appearance. From these unprecedented photometric data sets, covering wavelengths from the blue up to the near-infrared, we performed a thorough assessment of their reality as stellar aggregates. We statistically assigned to each observed star within the object region a probability of being a fiducial feature of that field in terms of its local luminosity function, colour distribution and stellar density. Likewise, we used accurate parallaxes and proper motions measured by the Gaia satellite to help our decision on the open cluster reality. Ten catalogued aggregates did not show any hint of being real physical systems; three of them had been assumed to be open clusters in previous studies, though. On the other hand, we estimated reliable fundamental parameters for the remaining five studied objects, which were confirmed as real open clusters. They resulted to be clusters distributed in a wide age range, 8.0 < log(t yr-1) < 9.4, of solar metal content and placed between 2.0 and 5.5 kpc from the Sun. Their ages and metallicities are in agreement with the presently known picture of the spatial distribution of open clusters in the Galactic disc.
  • We address the presently exciting issue of the presence of stellar clusters in the periphery of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) and beyond by making use of a wealth of wide-field high-quality images released in advance from the Magellanic Stellar Hystory (SMASH) survey. We conducted a sound search for new stellar cluster candidates from suitable kernel density estimators running for appropriate ranges of radii and stellar densities. In addition, we used a functional relationship to account for the completeness of the SMASH field sample analyzed that takes into account not only the number of fields used but also their particular spatial distribution; the present sample statistically represents ~ 50$% of the whole SMASH survey. The relative small number of new stellar cluster candidates identified, most of them distributed in the outer regions of the Magellanic Clouds, might suggest that the lack of detection of a larger number of new cluster candidates beyond the main bodies of the Magellanic Clouds could likely be the outcome once the survey be completed.
  • We present a comprehensive UBVRI and Washington CT1T2 photometric analysis of seven catalogued open clusters, namely: Ruprecht 3, 9, 37, 74, 150, ESO 324-15 and 436-2. The multi-band photometric data sets in combination with 2MASS photometry and Gaia astrometry for the brighter stars were used to estimate their structural parameters and fundamental astrophysical properties. We found that Ruprecht 3 and ESO 436-2 do not show self-consistent evidence of being physical systems. The remained studied objects are open clusters of intermediate-age (9.0 < log(t yr-1) < 9.6), of relatively small size (r_cls ~ 0.4 - 1.3 pc) and placed between 0.6 and 2.9 kpc from the Sun. We analized the relationships between core, half-mass, tidal and Jacoby radii as well as half-mass relaxation times to conclude that the studied clusters are in an evolved dynamical stage. The cluster masses obtained by summing those of the observed cluster stars resulted to be ~ 10-15 per cent of the masses of open clusters of similar age located closer than 2 kpc from the Sun. We found that cluster stars occupy volumes as large as those for tidally filled clusters.
  • We study the hierarchical stellar structures in a $\sim$1.5 deg$^2$ area covering the 30 Doradus-N158-N159-N160 star-forming complex with the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. Based on the young upper main-sequence stars, we find that the surface densities cover a wide range of values, from log($\Sigma\cdot$pc$^2$) $\lesssim$ $-$2.0 to log($\Sigma\cdot$pc$^2$) $\gtrsim$ 0.0. Their distributions are highly non-uniform, showing groups that frequently have sub-groups inside. The sizes of the stellar groups do not exhibit characteristic values, and range continuously from several parsecs to more than 100 pc; the cumulative size distribution can be well described by a single power law, with the power-law index indicating a projected fractal dimension $D_2$ = 1.6 $\pm$ 0.3. We suggest that the phenomena revealed here support a scenario of hierarchical star formation. Comparisons with other star-forming regions and galaxies are also discussed.
  • We turn our attention to Haffner 9, a Milky Way open cluster whose previous fundamental parameter estimates are far from being in agreement. In order to provide with accurate estimates we present high-quality Washington CT1 and Johnson BVI photometry of the cluster field. We put particular care in statistically clean the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) from field star contamination, which was found a common source in previous works for the discordant fundamental parameter estimates. The resulting cluster CMD fiducial features were confirmed from a proper motion membership analysis. Haffner 9 is a moderately young object (age ~ 350 Myr), placed in the Perseus arm -at a heliocentric distance of ~ 3.2 kpc-, with a lower limit for its present mass of ~ 160 Mo and of nearly metal solar content. The combination of the cluster structural and fundamental parameters suggest that it is in an advanced stage of internal dynamical evolution, possibly in the phase typical of those with mass segregation in their core regions. However, the cluster still keeps its mass function close to that of the Salpeter's law.
  • We present results from Johnson $UBV$, Kron-Cousins $RI$ and Washington $CT_1T_2$ photometries for seven van den Bergh-Hagen (vdBH) open clusters, namely, vdBH\,1, 10, 31, 72, 87, 92, and 118. The high-quality, multi-band photometric data sets were used to trace the cluster stellar density radial profiles and to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and colour-colour (CC) diagrams from which we estimated their structural parameters and fundamental astrophysical properties. The clusters in our sample cover a wide age range, from $\sim$ 60 Myr up to 2.8 Gyr, are of relatively small size ($\sim$ 1 $-$ 6 pc) and are placed at distances from the Sun which vary between 1.8 and 6.3 kpc, respectively. We also estimated lower limits for the cluster present-day masses as well as half-mass relaxation times ($t_r$). The resulting values in combination with the structural parameter values suggest that the studied clusters are in advanced stages of their internal dynamical evolution (age/$t_r$ $\sim$ 20 $-$ 320), possibly in the typical phase of those tidally filled with mass segregation in their core regions. Compared to open clusters in the solar neighbourhood, the seven vdBH clusters are within more massive ($\sim$ 80 $-$ 380$M_\odot$), with higher concentration parameter values ($c$ $\sim$ 0.75$-$1.15) and dynamically evolved ones.
  • We combine a number of recent studies of the extended main sequence turn-off (eMSTO) phenomenon in intermediate age stellar ($1-2$ Gyr) clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in order to investigate its origin. By employing the largest sample of eMSTO LMC clusters so far used, we show that cluster core radii, masses, and dynamical state are not related to the genesis of eMSTOs. Indeed, clusters in our sample have core radii, masses and age-relaxation time ratios in the range $\approx$ 2--6 pc, 3.35- 5.50 (log($M_{cls}$/$M_\odot$) and 0.2-8.0, respectively. These results imply that the eMSTO phenomenon is not caused by actual age spreads within the clusters. Furthermore, we confirm from a larger cluster sample recent results including young eMSTO LMC clusters, that the FWHM at the MSTOs correlates most strongly with cluster age, suggesting that a stellar evolutionary effect is the underlying cause.
  • We present results for an up-to-date uncatalogued star cluster projected towards the Eastern side of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) outer disc. The new object was discovered from a search of loose star cluster in the Magellanic Clouds' (MCs) outskirts using kernel density estimators on Washington CT1 deep images. Contrarily to what would be commonly expected, the star cluster resulted to be a young object (log(t /yr) = 8.45) with a slightly subsolar metal content (Z = 0.013) and a total mass of 650Mo. Its core, half-mass and tidal radii also are within the frequent values of LMC star clusters. However, the new star cluster is placed at the Small Magellanic Cloud distance and at 11.3 kpc from the LMC centre. We speculate with the possibility that it was born in the inner body of the LMC and soon after expeled into the intergalactic space during the recent Milky Way/MCs interaction. Nevertheless, radial velocity and chemical abundance measurements are needed to further understand its origin, as well as extensive search for loose star clusters in order to constrain the effectiveness of star cluster scattering during galaxy interactions.
  • We present an imaging analysis of four low mass stellar clusters (< 5000 Mo) in the outer regions of the LMC in order to shed light on the extended main sequence turn-off (eMSTO) phenomenon observed in high mass clusters. The four clusters have ages between 1-2 Gyr and two of them appear to host eMTSOs. The discovery of eMSTOs in such low mass clusters - > 5 times less massive than the eMSTO clusters previously studied - suggests that mass is not the controlling factor in whether clusters host eMSTOs. Additionally, the narrow extent of the eMSTO in the two older (~ 2 Gyr) clusters is in agreement with predictions of the stellar rotation scenario, as lower mass stars are expected to be magnetically braked, meaning that their CMDs should be better reproduced by canonical simple stellar populations. We also performed a structural analysis on all the clusters and found that a large core radius is not a requisite for a cluster to exhibit an eMSTO.