• RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) are tracers of the Milky Way's fossil record, holding valuable information on its formation and early evolution. Owing to the high interstellar extinction endemic to the Galactic plane, distant RRLs lying at low Galactic latitudes have been elusive. We attained a census of 1892 high-confidence RRLs by exploiting the near-infrared photometric database of the VVV survey's disk footprint spanning $\sim$70$^\circ$ of Galactic longitude, using a machine-learned classifier. Novel data-driven methods were employed to accurately characterize their spatial distribution using sparsely sampled multi-band photometry. The RRL metallicity distribution function (MDF) was derived from their $K_s$-band light curve parameters using machine-learning methods. The MDF shows remarkable structural similarities to both the spectroscopic MDF of red clump giants and the MDF of bulge RRLs. We model the MDF with a multi-component density distribution and find that the number density of stars associated with the different model components systematically changes with both the Galactocentric radius and vertical distance from the Galactic plane, equivalent to weak metallicity gradients. Based on the consistency with results from the ARGOS survey, three MDF modes are attributed to the old disk populations, while the most metal-poor RRLs are probably halo interlopers. We propose that the dominant [Fe/H] component with a mean of $-1$ dex might correspond to the outskirts of an ancient Galactic spheroid or classical bulge component residing in the central Milky Way. The physical origins of the RRLs in this study need to be verified by kinematical information.
  • Transmission spectroscopy during planetary transits is expected to be a major source of information on the atmospheres of small (approximately Earth-sized) exoplanets in the next two decades. This technique, however, is intrinsically affected by stellar spectral contamination caused by the fact that stellar photo- and chromospheres are not perfectly homogeneous. Such stellar contamination will often reach or exceed the signal introduced by the planetary spectral features. Finding effective methods to correct stellar contamination -- or at least to quantify its possible range -- for the most important exoplanets is a necessary step for our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres. This will require significantly deepening our understanding of stellar heterogeneity, which is currently limited by the available data.
  • We report the discovery of EPIC247098361b using photometric data of the Kepler K2 satellite coupled with ground-based spectroscopic observations. EPIC247098361b has a mass of M$_{P}=0.397\pm 0.037$ M$_J$, a radius of R$_{P}=1.00 \pm 0.020$ R$_J$, and a moderately low equilibrium temperature of $T_{eq}=1030 \pm 15$ K due to its relatively large star-planet separation of $a=0.1036$ AU. EPIC247098361b orbits its bright ($V=9.9$) late F-type host star in an eccentric orbit ($e=0.258 \pm 0.025$) every 11.2 days, and is one of only four well characterized warm Jupiters having hosts stars brighter than $V=10$. We estimate a heavy element content of 20 $\pm$ 7 M$_{\oplus}$ for EPIC247098361b, which is consistent with standard models of giant planet formation. The bright host star of EPIC247098361b makes this system a well suited target for detailed follow-up observations that will aid in the study of the atmospheres and orbital evolution of giant planets at moderate separations from their host stars.
  • We describe the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), which is a ground-based project searching for transiting exoplanets orbiting bright stars. NGTS builds on the legacy of previous surveys, most notably WASP, and is designed to achieve higher photometric precision and hence find smaller planets than have previously been detected from the ground. It also operates in red light, maximising sensitivity to late K and early M dwarf stars. The survey specifications call for photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in red light over an instantaneous field of view of 100 square degrees, enabling the detection of Neptune-sized exoplanets around Sun-like stars and super-Earths around M dwarfs. The survey is carried out with a purpose-built facility at Cerro Paranal, Chile, which is the premier site of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). An array of twelve 20cm f/2.8 telescopes fitted with back-illuminated deep-depletion CCD cameras are used to survey fields intensively at intermediate Galactic latitudes. The instrument is also ideally suited to ground-based photometric follow-up of exoplanet candidates from space telescopes such as TESS, Gaia and PLATO. We present observations that combine precise autoguiding and the superb observing conditions at Paranal to provide routine photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in 1 hour for stars with I-band magnitudes brighter than 13. We describe the instrument and data analysis methods as well as the status of the survey, which achieved first light in 2015 and began full survey operations in 2016. NGTS data will be made publicly available through the ESO archive.
  • We present the discovery of K2-113b, a dense hot-Jupiter discovered using photometry from Campaign 8 of the Kepler-2 (K2) mission and high-resolution spectroscopic follow up obtained with the FEROS spectrograph. The planet orbits a $V=13.68$ solar analogue in a $P=5.81760^{+0.00003}_{-0.00003}$ day orbit, has a radius of $0.93^{+0.10}_{-0.07}R_J$ and a mass of $1.29^{+0.13}_{-0.14}M_J$. With a density of $1.97^{+0.60}_{-0.53}$ gr/cm$^3$, the planet is among the densest systems known having masses below 2 $M_J$ and $T_{eq} > 1000$, and is just above the temperature limit at which inflation mechanisms are believed to start being important. Based on its mass and radius, we estimate that K2-113b should have a heavy element content on the order of $\sim$ 110 $M_{\oplus}$ or greater.
  • We present the first ALMA observations of the closest known extrasolar debris disc. This disc orbits the star $\epsilon$ Eridani, a K-type star just 3.2pc away. Due to the proximity of the star, the entire disc cannot fit within the ALMA field of view. Therefore, the observations have been centred 18" North of the star, providing us with a clear detection of the northern arc of the ring, at a wavelength of 1.3mm. The observed disc emission is found to be narrow with a width of just 11-13AU. The fractional disc width we find is comparable to that of the Solar System's Kuiper Belt and makes this one of the narrowest debris discs known. If the inner and outer edges are due to resonances with a planet then this planet likely has a semi-major axis of 48AU. We find tentative evidence for clumps in the ring, although there is a strong chance that at least one is a background galaxy. We confirm, at much higher significance, the previous detection of an unresolved emission at the star that is above the level of the photosphere and attribute this excess to stellar chromospheric emission.
  • We report the discovery of three moderately high-mass transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b. These planets add to the numbers of known planets in the ~2MJ regime. HATS-22b is a 2.74+/-0.11 MJ mass and 0.953+0.048/-0.029 RJ radius planet orbiting a V = 13.455 +/- 0.040 sub-silar mass (M_star = 0.759+/-0.019 M_sun; R_star = 0.759+/-0.019 R_sun) K-dwarf host star on an eccentric (e = 0.079 +/- 0.026) orbit. This planet's high planet-to-stellar mass ratio is further evidence that migration mechanisms for hot Jupiters may rely on exciting orbital eccentricities that bring planets closer to their parent stars followed by tidal circularisation. HATS-23b is a 1.478 +/- 0.080 MJ mass and 1.69 +/- 0.24 RJ radius planet on a grazing orbit around a V = 13.901 +/- 0.010 G-dwarf with properties very similar to those of the Sun (M_star = 1.115 +/- 0.054 M_sun; R_star = 1.145 +/- 0.070 R_sun). HATS-24b orbits a moderately bright V = 12.830 +/- 0.010 F-dwarf star (M_star = 1.218 +/- 0.036 M_sun; R_star = 1.194+0.066/-0.041 R_sun). This planet has a mass of 2.39 +0.21/-0.12 MJ and an inflated radius of 1.516 +0.085/-0.065 RJ.
  • We present the Collection of Elemental Routines for Echelle Spectra (CERES). These routines were developed for the construction of automated pipelines for the reduction, extraction and analysis of spectra acquired with different instruments, allowing the obtention of homogeneous and standardised results. This modular code includes tools for handling the different steps of the processing: CCD image reductions, identification and tracing of the echelle orders, optimal and rectangular extraction, computation of the wavelength solution, estimation of radial velocities, and rough and fast estimation of the atmospheric parameters. Currently, CERES has been used to develop automated pipelines for thirteen different spectrographs, namely CORALIE, FEROS, HARPS, ESPaDOnS, FIES, PUCHEROS, FIDEOS, CAFE, DuPont/Echelle, Magellan/Mike, Keck/HIRES, Magellan/PFS and APO/ARCES, but the routines can be easily used in order to deal with data coming from other spectrographs. We show the high precision in radial velocity that CERES achieves for some of these instruments and we briefly summarize some results that have already been obtained using the CERES pipelines.
  • GJ 1214b is the most studied sub-Neptune exoplanet to date. Recent measurements have shown its near-infrared transmission spectrum to be flat, pointing to a high-altitude opacity source in the exoplanet's atmosphere, either equilibrium condensate clouds or photochemical hazes. Many photometric observations have been reported in the optical by different groups, though simultaneous measurements spanning the entire optical regime are lacking. We present an optical transmission spectrum ($4,500-9,260$\AA) of GJ 1214b in 14 bins measured with Magellan/IMACS repeatedly over three transits. We measure a mean planet-to-star radius ratio of ${R_{p}/R_{s} = 0.1146\pm{2\times10^{-4}}}$ and mean uncertainty of $\sigma(R_{p}/R_{s})=8.7\times10^{-4}$ in the spectral bins. The optical transit depths are shallower on average than observed in the near-infrared. We present a model for jointly incorporating the effects of a composite photosphere and atmospheric transmission (CPAT) through the exoplanet's limb, and use it to examine the cases of absorber and temperature heterogeneities in the stellar photosphere. We find the optical and near-infrared measurements are best explained by the combination of (1) photochemical haze in the exoplanetary atmosphere with a mode particle size $r=0.1~\mu$m and haze-forming efficiency $f_{haze}=10 \%$ and (2) faculae in the unocculted stellar disk with a temperature contrast $\Delta T=354^{+46}_{-46}$ K, assuming 3.2% surface coverage. The CPAT model can be used to assess potential contributions of heterogeneous stellar photospheres to observations of exoplanet transmission spectra, which will be important for searches for spectral features in the optical.
  • The analysis of Proxima Centauri's radial velocities recently led Anglada-Escud\'e et al. (2016) to claim the presence of a low mass planet orbiting the Sun's nearest star once every 11.2 days. Although the a-priori probability that Proxima b transits its parent star is just 1.5%, the potential impact of such a discovery would be considerable. Independent of recent radial velocity efforts, we observed Proxima Centauri for 12.5 days in 2014 and 31 days in 2015 with the MOST space telescope. We report here that we cannot make a compelling case that Proxima b transits in our precise photometric time series. Imposing an informative prior on the period and phase, we do detect a candidate signal with the expected depth. However, perturbing the phase prior across 100 evenly spaced intervals reveals one strong false-positive and one weaker instance. We estimate a false-positive rate of at least a few percent and a much higher false-negative rate of 20-40%, likely caused by the very high flare rate of Proxima Centauri. Comparing our candidate signal to HATSouth ground-based photometry reveals that the signal is somewhat, but not conclusively, disfavored (1-2 sigmas) leading us to argue that the signal is most likely spurious. We expect that infrared photometric follow-up could more conclusively test the existence of this candidate signal, owing to the suppression of flare activity and the impressive infrared brightness of the parent star.
  • Variable stars of RR Lyrae type are a prime tool to obtain distances to old stellar populations in the Milky Way, and one of the main aims of the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) near-infrared survey is to use them to map the structure of the Galactic Bulge. Due to the large number of expected sources, this requires an automated mechanism for selecting RR Lyrae,and particularly those of the more easily recognized type ab (i.e., fundamental-mode pulsators), from the 10^6-10^7 variables expected in the VVV survey area. In this work we describe a supervised machine-learned classifier constructed for assigning a score to a K_s-band VVV light curve that indicates its likelihood of being ab-type RR Lyrae. We describe the key steps in the construction of the classifier, which were the choice of features, training set, selection of aperture and family of classifiers. We find that the AdaBoost family of classifiers give consistently the best performance for our problem, and obtain a classifier based on the AdaBoost algorithm that achieves a harmonic mean between false positives and false negatives of ~7% for typical VVV light curve sets. This performance is estimated using cross-validation and through the comparison to two independent datasets that were classified by human experts.
  • Diffuse star clusters (DSCs) are old and dynamically hot stellar systems that have lower surface brightness and more extended morphology than globular clusters (GCs). Using the images from HST/ACS Fornax Cluster Survey, we find that 12 out of 43 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Fornax cluster host significant numbers of DSCs. Together with literature data from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey, where 18 out of 100 ETGs were found to host DSCs, we systematically study the relationship of DSCs with GCs, and their host galaxy environment. Two DSC hosts are post-merger galaxies, with most of the other hosts either having low mass or showing clear disk components. We find that while the number ratio of DSCs to GCs is nearly constant in massive galaxies, the DSC-to-GC ratio becomes systematically higher in lower mass hosts. This suggests that DSCs may be more efficient at forming (or surviving) in low density environments. DSC hosts are not special either in their position in the cluster, or in the galactic color-magnitude diagram. Why some disk and low-mass galaxies host DSCs while others do not is still a puzzle, however. The mean ages of DSC hosts and non-hosts are similar at similar masses, implying that formation efficiency, rather than survival, is the reason behind different DSC number fractions in early-type galaxies.
  • We present 197 planet candidates discovered using data from the first year of the NASA K2 mission (Campaigns 0-4), along with the results of an intensive program of photometric analyses, stellar spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging, and statistical validation. We distill these candidates into sets of 104 validated planets (57 in multi-planet systems), 30 false positives, and 63 remaining candidates. Our validated systems span a range of properties, with median values of R_P = 2.3 R_E, P=8.6 d, Tef = 5300 K, and Kp=12.7 mag. Stellar spectroscopy provides precise stellar and planetary parameters for most of these systems. We show that K2 has increased by 30% the number of small planets known to orbit moderately bright stars (1-4 R_E, Kp=9-13 mag). Of particular interest are 37 planets smaller than 2 R_E, 15 orbiting stars brighter than Kp=11.5, five receiving Earth-like irradiation levels, and several multi-planet systems -- including four planets orbiting the M dwarf K2-72 near mean-motion resonances. By quantifying the likelihood that each candidate is a planet we demonstrate that our candidate sample has an overall false positive rate of 15-30%, with rates substantially lower for small candidates (< 2 R_E) and larger for candidates with radii > 8 R_E and/or with P < 3 d. Extrapolation of the current planetary yield suggests that K2 will discover between 500-1000 planets in its planned four-year mission -- assuming sufficient follow-up resources are available. Efficient observing and analysis, together with an organized and coherent follow-up strategy, is essential to maximize the efficacy of planet-validation efforts for K2, TESS, and future large-scale surveys.
  • We describe the Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator (ZASPE), a new algorithm, and its associated code, for determining precise stellar atmospheric parameters and their uncertainties from high resolution echelle spectra of FGK-type stars. ZASPE estimates stellar atmospheric parameters by comparing the observed spectrum against a grid of synthetic spectra only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. Realistic uncertainties in the parameters are computed from the data itself, by taking into account the systematic mismatches between the observed spectrum and the best-fit synthetic one. The covariances between the parameters are also estimated in the process. ZASPE can in principle use any pre-calculated grid of synthetic spectra. We tested the performance of two existing libraries (Coehelo et al. 2005, Husser et al. 2013) and we concluded that neither is suitable for computing precise atmospheric parameters. We describe a process to synthesise a new library of synthetic spectra that was found to generate consistent results when compared with parameters obtained with different methods (interferometry, asteroseismology, equivalent widths).
  • We report the discovery of BD+20594b, a high density sub-Neptune exoplanet, made using photometry from Campaign 4 of the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission, ground-based radial velocity follow-up from HARPS and high resolution lucky and adaptive optics imaging obtained using AstraLux and MagAO, respectively. The host star is a bright ($V=11.04$, $K_s = 9.37$), slightly metal poor ([Fe/H]$=-0.15\pm 0.05$ dex) solar analogue located at $152.1^{+9.7}_{-7.4}$ pc from Earth, for which we find a radius of $R_*=0.928^{+0.055}_{-0.040}R_\odot$ and a mass of $M_* = 0.961^{+0.032}_{-0.029}M_\odot$. A joint analysis of the K2 photometry and HARPS radial velocities reveal that the planet is in a $\approx 42$ day orbit around its host star, has a radius of $2.23^{+0.14}_{-0.11}R_\oplus$, and a mass of $16.3^{+6.0}_{-6.1}M_\oplus$. Although the data at hand puts the planet in the region of the mass-radius diagram where we could expect planets with a pure rock (i.e. magnesium silicate) composition using two-layer models (i.e., between rock/iron and rock/ice compositions), we discuss more realistic three-layer composition models which can explain the high density of the discovered exoplanet. The fact that the planet lies in the boundary between "possibly rocky" and "non-rocky" exoplanets, makes it an interesting planet for future RV follow-up.
  • We report the discovery of two hot Jupiters using photometry from Campaigns 4 and 5 of the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission. K2-30b has a mass of $ 0.65 \pm 0.14 M_J$, a radius of $1.070 \pm 0.018 R_J$ and transits its G dwarf ($T_{eff} = 5675 \pm 50$ K), slightly metal rich ([Fe/H]$=+0.06\pm0.04$ dex) host star in a 4.1 days circular orbit. K2-34b has a mass of $ 1.63 \pm 0.12 M_J$, a radius of $1.38 \pm 0.014 R_J$ and has an orbital period of 3.0 days in which it orbits a late F dwarf ($T_{eff} = 6149 \pm 55$ K) solar metallicity star. Both planets were validated probabilistically and confirmed via precision radial velocity (RV) measurements. They have physical and orbital properties similar to the ones of the already uncovered population of hot Jupiters and are well-suited candidates for further orbital and atmospheric characterization via detailed follow-up observations. Given that the discovery of both systems was recently reported by other groups we take the opportunity of refining the planetary parameters by including the RVs obtained by these independent studies in our global analysis.
  • We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg$^2$ (0.3 Mpc$^2$) area in the core of the Virgo cluster, based on $ugriz$ data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample consists of 352 objects brighter than $M_g=-9.13$ mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint end slope of $\alpha=-1.33 \pm 0.02$ for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function as well as the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultra compact dwarfs galaxies (UCDs) -- previously compiled by the NGVS in this region -- to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, $M_g = -9.6$ mag) increases dramatically, up to $\alpha = -1.60 \pm 0.06$ when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo due to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ~150 objects with $M_g\lesssim-9.6$ mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters, might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the core of Virgo might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ~40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group satellites, $\alpha=-1.21\pm0.05$.
  • The star HR 8799 hosts one of the largest known debris discs and at least four giant planets. Previous observations have found evidence for a warm belt within the orbits of the planets, a cold planetesimal belt beyond their orbits and a halo of small grains. With the infrared data, it is hard to distinguish the planetesimal belt emission from that of the grains in the halo. With this in mind, the system has been observed with ALMA in band 6 (1.34 mm) using a compact array format. These observations allow the inner edge of the planetesimal belt to be resolved for the first time. A radial distribution of dust grains is fitted to the data using an MCMC method. The disc is best fit by a broad ring between $145^{+12}_{-12}$ AU and $429^{+37}_{-32}$ AU at an inclination of $40^{+5}_{-6}${\deg} and a position angle of $51^{+8}_{-8}${\deg}. A disc edge at ~145 AU is too far out to be explained simply by interactions with planet b, requiring either a more complicated dynamical history or an extra planet beyond the orbit of planet b.
  • We analyze the kinematics of six Virgo cluster dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) from their globular cluster (GC) systems. We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy for three of them and reanalyze the data found in the literature for the remaining three. We use two independent methods to estimate the rotation amplitude (Vmax) and velocity dispersion (sigma_GC) of the GC systems and evaluate their statistical significance by simulating non-rotating GC systems with the same number of GC satellites and velocity uncertainties. Our measured kinematics agree with the published values for the three galaxies from the literature and, in all cases, some rotation is measured. However, our simulations show that the null hypothesis of being non-rotating GC systems cannot be ruled out. In the case of VCC1861, the measured Vmax and the simulations indicate that it is not rotating. In the case of VCC1528, the null hypothesis can be marginally ruled out, thus, it might be rotating although further confirmation is needed. In our analysis, we find that, in general, the measured Vmax tends to be overestimated and the measured sigma_GC tends to be underestimated by amounts that depend on the intrinsic Vmax/sigma_GC, the number of observed GCs (N_GC), and the velocity uncertainties. The bias is negligible when N_GC>~20. In those cases where a large N_GC is not available, it is imperative to obtain data with small velocity uncertainties. For instance, errors of <2km/s lead to Vmax<10km/s for a system that is intrinsically not rotating.
  • Very precise measurements of exoplanet transit lightcurves both from ground and space based observatories make it now possible to fit the limb-darkening coefficients in the transit-fitting procedure rather than fix them to theoretical values. This strategy has been shown to give better results, as fixing the coefficients to theoretical values can give rise to important systematic errors which directly impact the physical properties of the system derived from such lightcurves such as the planetary radius. However, studies of the effect of limb darkening assumptions on the retrieved parameters have mostly focused on the widely used quadratic limb-darkening law, leaving out other proposed laws that are either simpler or better descriptions of model intensity profiles. In this work, we show that laws such as the logarithmic, square-root and three-parameter law do a better job than the quadratic and linear laws when deriving parameters from transit lightcurves, both in terms of bias and precision, for a wide range of situations. We therefore recommend to study which law to use on a case-by-case basis. We provide code to guide the decision of when to use each of these laws and select the optimal one in a mean-square error sense, which we note has a dependence on both stellar and transit parameters. Finally, we demonstrate that the so-called exponential law is non-physical as it typically produces negative intensities close to the limb and should therefore not be used.
  • We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive, red-sequence galaxies M87, M49 and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color-color diagrams ($u^*iK_s$ or $u^*gz$). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ~3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters, and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ~85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.
  • The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey has recently determined the luminosity function of galaxies in the core of the Virgo cluster down to unprecedented magnitude and surface brightness limits. Comparing simulations of cluster formation to the derived central stellar mass function, we attempt to estimate the stellar-to-halo-mass ratio (SHMR) for dwarf galaxies, as it would have been before they fell into the cluster. This approach ignores several details and complications, e.g., the contribution of ongoing star formation to the present-day stellar mass of cluster members, and the effects of adiabatic contraction and/or violent feedback on the subhalo and cluster potentials. The final results are startlingly simple, however; we find that the trends in the SHMR determined previously for bright galaxies appear to extend down in a scale-invariant way to the faintest objects detected in the survey. These results extend measurements of the formation efficiency of field galaxies by two decades in halo mass, or five decades in stellar mass, down to some of the least massive dwarf galaxies known, with stellar masses of $\sim 10^5 M_\odot$.
  • We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster systems and diffuse stellar light of four intermediate luminosity (sub-$L^{\ast}$) early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster based on Gemini/GMOS data. Our galaxy sample is fainter ($-23.8<M_K<-22.7$) than most previous studies, nearly doubling the number of galaxies in this magnitude range that now have GC kinematics. The data for the diffuse light extends to $4R_e$, and the data for the globular clusters reaches 8--$12R_e$. We find that the kinematics in these outer regions are all different despite the fact that these four galaxies have similar photometric properties, and are uniformly classified as "fast rotators" from their stellar kinematics within $1R_e$. The globular cluster systems exhibit a wide range of kinematic morphology. The rotation axis and amplitude can change between the inner and outer regions, including a case of counter-rotation. This difference shows the importance of wide-field kinematic studies, and shows that stellar and GC kinematics can change significantly as one moves beyond the inner regions of galaxies. Moreover, the kinematics of the globular cluster systems can differ from that of the stars, suggesting that the formation of the two populations are also distinct.
  • Limb-darkening is fundamental in determining transit lightcurve shapes, and is typically modeled by a variety of laws that parametrize the intensity profile of the star that is being transited. Confronted with a transit lightcurve, some authors fix the parameters of these laws, the so-called limb-darkening coefficients (LDCs), while others prefer to let them float in the lightcurve fitting procedure. Which of these is the best strategy, however, is still unclear, as well as how and by how much each of these can bias the retrieved transit parameters. In this work we attempt to clarify those points by first re-calculating these LDCs, comparing them to measured values from Kepler transit lightcurves using an algorithm that takes into account uncertainties in both the geometry of the transit and the parameters of the stellar host. We show there are significant departures from predicted model values, suggesting that our understanding of limb-darkening still needs to improve. Then, we show through simulations that if one uses the quadratic limb-darkening law to parametrize limb-darkening, fixing and fitting the LDCs can lead to significant biases -up to $\sim 3\%$ and $\sim 1\%$ in $R_p/R_*$, respectively-, which are important for several confirmed and candidate exoplanets. We conclude that, in this case, the best approach is to let the LDCs be free in the fitting procedure. Strategies to avoid biases in data from present and future missions involving high precision measurements of transit parameters are described.
  • The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs)--objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies--has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme GCs, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs (rh >~10 pc) and 911 GCs associated with central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M_star > ~2X10^6 M_sun and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the sample of previous confirmed Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying the global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of the blue GCs in the inner ~ 70 kpc and as steep as that of the red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than the GCs, and the blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have a radially increasing orbital anisotropy profile, and are tangentially-biased at radii < ~ 40 kpc and radially-biased further out. In contrast, the blue GCs become more tangentially-biased at larger radii beyond ~ 40 kpc; (4) GCs with M_star > 2X10^6 M_sun have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially-biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the "tidally threshed dwarf galaxy" scenario.