• Conventional nano-photonic schemes minimise multiple scattering to realise a miniaturised version of beam-splitters, interferometers and optical cavities for light propagation and lasing. Here instead, we introduce a nanophotonic network built from multiple paths and interference, to control and enhance light-matter interaction via light localisation. The network is built from a mesh of subwavelength waveguides, and can sustain localised modes and mirror-less light trapping stemming from interference over hundreds of nodes. With optical gain, these modes can easily lase, reaching $\sim$100 pm linewidths. We introduce a graph solution to the Maxwell's equation which describes light on the network, and predicts lasing action. In this framework, the network optical modes can be designed via the network connectivity and topology, and lasing can be tailored and enhanced by the network shape. Nanophotonic networks pave the way for new laser device architectures, which can be used for sensitive biosensing and on-chip optical information processing.
  • Hybrid polymer-plasmonic nanostructures might combine high enhancement of localized fields from metal nanoparticles with light confinement and long-range transport in subwavelength dielectric structures. Here we report on the complex behavior of fluorophores coupling to Au nanoparticles within polymer nanowires, which features localized metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) with unique characteristics compared to conventional structures. The intensification effect when the particle is placed in the organic filaments is remarkably higher with respect to thin films of comparable thickness, thus highlighting a specific, nanowire-related enhancement of MEF effects. A dependence on the confinement volume in the dielectric nanowire is also evidenced, with MEF significantly increasing upon reducing the wire diameter. These findings are rationalized by finite element simulations, predicting a position-dependent enhancement of the quantum yield of fluorophores embedded in the fibers. Calculation of the ensemble-averaged fluorescence enhancement unveils the possibility of strongly enhancing the overall emission intensity for structures with size twice the diameter of the embedded metal particles. These new, hybrid fluorescent systems with localized enhanced emission, as well as the general Nanowire-Intensified MEF effect associated to them, are highly relevant for developing nanoscale light-emitting devices with high efficiency and inter-coupled through nanofiber networks, highly sensitive optical sensors, and novel laser architectures.
  • Conjugated polymers are complex multi-chromophore systems, with emission properties strongly dependent on the electronic energy transfer through active sub-units. Although the packing of the conjugated chains in the solid state is known to be a key factor to tailor the electronic energy transfer and the resulting optical properties, most of the current solution-based processing methods do not allow for effectively controlling the molecular order, thus making the full unveiling of energy transfer mechanisms very complex. Here we report on conjugated polymer fibers with tailored internal molecular order, leading to a significant enhancement of the emission quantum yield. Steady state and femtosecond time-resolved polarized spectroscopies evidence that excitation is directed toward those chromophores oriented along the fiber axis, on a typical timescale of picoseconds. These aligned and more extended chromophores, resulting from the high stretching rate and electric field applied during the fiber spinning process, lead to improved emission properties. Conjugated polymer fibers are relevant to develop optoelectronic plastic devices with enhanced and anisotropic properties.
  • Nanoscale generation of individual photons in confined geometries is an exciting research field aiming at exploiting localized electromagnetic fields for light manipulation. One of the outstanding challenges of photonic systems combining emitters with nanostructured media is the selective channelling of photons emitted by embedded sources into specific optical modes and their transport at distant locations in integrated systems. Here, we show that soft-matter nanofibers, electrospun with embedded emitters, combine subwavelength field localization and large broadband near-field coupling with low propagation losses. By momentum spectroscopy, we quantify the modal coupling efficiency identifying the regime of single-mode coupling. These nanofibers do not rely on resonant interactions, making them ideal for room-temperature operation, and offer a scalable platform for future quantum information technology.
  • In metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), the localized surface plasmon resonances of metallic nanostructures amplify the absorption of excitation light and assist in radiating the consequent fluorescence of nearby molecules to the far-field. This effect is at the base of various technologies that have strong impact on fields such as optics, medical diagnostics and biotechnology. Among possible emission bands, those in the near-infrared (NIR) are particularly intriguing and widely used in proteomics and genomics due to its noninvasive character for biomolecules, living cells, and tissues, which greatly motivates the development of effective, and eventually multifunctional NIR-MEF platforms. Here we demonstrate NIR-MEF substrates based on Au nanocages micropatterned with a tight spatial control. The dependence of the fluorescence enhancement on the distance between the nanocage and the radiating dipoles is investigated experimentally and modeled by taking into account the local electric field enhancement and the modified radiation and absorption rates of the emitting molecules. At a distance around 80 nm, a maximum enhancement up to 2-7 times with respect to the emission from pristine dyes (in the region 660 nm-740 nm) is estimated for films and electrospun nanofibers. Due to their chemical stability, finely tunable plasmon resonances, and large light absorption cross sections, Au nanocages are ideal NIR-MEF agents. When these properties are integrated with the hollow interior and controllable surface porosity, it is feasible to develop a nanoscale system for targeted drug delivery with the diagnostic information encoded in the fluorophore.
  • Electrospun polymer jets are imaged for the first time at an ultra-high rate of 10,000 frames per second, investigating the process dynamics, and the instability propagation velocity and displacement in space. The polymer concentration, applied voltage bias and needle-collector distance are systematically varied, and their influence on the instability propagation velocity and on the jet angular fluctuations analyzed. This allows us to unveil the instability formation and cycling behavior, and its exponential growth at the onset, exhibiting radial growth rates of the order of 10^3 s^-1. Allowing the conformation and evolution of polymeric solutions to be studied in depth, high-speed imaging at sub-ms scale shows a significant potential for improving the fundamental knowledge of electrified jets, leading to obtain finely controllable bending and solution stretching in electrospinning, and consequently better designed nanofibers morphologies and structures.
  • The authors report on a room-temperature nanoimprinted, DNA-based distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating at 605 nm. The laser is made of a pure DNA host matrix doped with gain dyes. At high excitation densities, the emission of the untextured dye-doped DNA films is characterized by a broad emission peak with an overall linewidth of 12 nm and superimposed narrow peaks, characteristic of random lasing. Moreover, direct patterning of the DNA films is demonstrated with a resolution down to 100 nm, enabling the realization of both surface-emitting and edge-emitting DFB lasers with a typical linewidth<0.3 nm. The resulting emission is polarized, with a ratio between the TE- and TM-polarized intensities exceeding 30. In addition, the nanopatterned devices dissolve in water within less than two minutes. These results demonstrate the possibility of realizing various physically transient nanophotonics and laser architectures, including random lasing and nanoimprinted devices, based on natural biopolymers.
  • The simultaneous vertical-cavity and random lasing emission properties of a blue-emitting molecular crystal are investigated. The 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene samples, grown by physical vapour transport, feature room-temperature stimulated emission peaked at about 430 nm. Fabry-P\'erot and random resonances are primed by the interfaces of the crystal with external media and by defect scatterers, respectively. The analysis of the resulting lasing spectra evidences the existence of narrow peaks due to both the built-in vertical Fabry-P\'erot cavity and random lasing in a novel, surface-emitting configuration and threshold around 500 microJ cm^-2. The anti-correlation between different modes is also highlighted, due to competition for gain. Molecular crystals with optical gain candidate as promising photonic media inherently supporting multiple lasing mechanisms.
  • Polymer fibers are currently exploited in tremendously important technologies. Their innovative properties are mainly determined by the behavior of the polymer macromolecules under the elongation induced by external mechanical or electrostatic forces, characterizing the fiber drawing process. Although enhanced physical properties were observed in polymer fibers produced under strong stretching conditions, studies of the process-induced nanoscale organization of the polymer molecules are not available, and most of fiber properties are still obtained on an empirical basis. Here we reveal the orientational properties of semiflexible polymers in electrospun nanofibers, which allow the polarization properties of active fibers to be finely controlled. Modeling and simulations of the conformational evolution of the polymer chains during electrostatic elongation of semidilute solutions demonstrate that the molecules stretch almost fully within less than 1 mm from jet start, increasing polymer axial orientation at the jet center. The nanoscale mapping of the local dichroism of individual fibers by polarized near-field optical microscopy unveils for the first time the presence of an internal spatial variation of the molecular order, namely the presence of a core with axially aligned molecules and a sheath with almost radially oriented molecules. These results allow important and specific fiber properties to be manipulated and tailored, as here demonstrated for the polarization of emitted light.
  • Polymer micro- and nano-fibers, made of organic light-emitting materials with optical gain, show interesting lasing properties. Fibers with diameters from few tens of nm to few microns can be fabricated by electrospinning, a method based on electrostatic fields applied to a polymer solution. The morphology and emission properties of these fibers, composed of optically inert polymers embedding laser dyes, are characterized by scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy, and lasing is observed under optical pumping for fluences of the order of 10^2 microJ cm^-2. In addition, light-emitting fibers can be electrospun by conjugated polymers, their blends, and other active organics, and can be exploited in a range of photonic and electronic devices. In particular, waveguiding of light is observed and characterized, showing optical loss coefficient in the range of 10^2-10^3 cm^-1. The reduced size of these novel laser systems, combined with the possibility of achieving wavelength tunability through transistor or other electrode-based architectures embedding non-linear molecular layers, and with their peculiar mechanical robustness, open interesting perspectives for realizing miniaturized laser sources to integrate on-chip optical sensors and photonic circuits.
  • The properties of polymeric nanofibers can be tailored and enhanced by properly managing the structure of the polymeric molecules at the nanoscale. Although electrospun polymer fibers are increasingly exploited in many technological applications, their internal nanostructure, determining their improved physical properties, is still poorly investigated and understood. Here, we unravel the internal structure of electrospun functional nanofibers made by prototype conjugated polymers. The unique features of near field optical measurements are exploited to investigate the nanoscale spatial variation of the polymer density, evidencing the presence of a dense internal core embedded in a less dense polymeric shell. Interestingly, nanoscale mapping the fiber Young's modulus demonstrates that the dense core is stiffer than the polymeric, less dense shell. These findings are rationalized by developing a theoretical modeling and simulations of the polymer molecular structural evolution during the electrospinning process. This model predicts that the stretching of the polymer network induces a contraction towards the jet center of the network with a local increase of the polymer density, as observed in the solid structure. The found complex internal structure opens interesting perspective for improving and tailoring the molecular morphology and multifunctional electronic and optical properties of polymer fibers.
  • Light emitting electrospun nanofibers of poly-[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(N,N'-diphenyl)-N,N'-di(p-butyl-oxy-phenyl)-1,4-diaminobenzene)] (PFO-PBAB) are produced by electrospinning under different experimental conditions. In particular, uniform fibers with average diameter of 180 nm are obtained by adding an organic salt to the electrospinning solution. The spectroscopic investigation assesses that the presence of the organic salt does not alter the optical properties of the active material, therefore providing an alternative approach for the fabrication of highly emissive conjugated polymer nanofibers. The produced nanofibers display self-waveguiding of light, and polarized photoluminescence, which is especially promising for embedding active electrospun fibers in sensing and nanophotonic devices.
  • Polarized superradiant emission and exciton delocalization in tetracene single crystals are reported. Polarization-, time-, and temperature-resolved spectroscopy evidence the complete polarization of the zero-phonon line of the intrinsic tetracene emission from both the lower (F state) and the upper (thermally activated) Davydov excitons. The superradiance of the F emission is substantiated by a nearly linear decrease of the radiative lifetime with temperature, being fifteen times shorter at 30 K compared to the isolated molecule, with an exciton delocalization of about 40 molecules.
  • The optical trapping of polymeric nanofibers and the characterization of the rotational dynamics are reported. A strategy to apply a torque to a polymer nanofiber, by tilting the trapped fibers using a symmetrical linear polarized Gaussian beam is demonstrated. Rotation frequencies up to 10 Hz are measured, depending on the trapping power, the fiber length and the tilt angle. A comparison of the experimental rotation frequencies in the different trapping configurations with calculations based on optical trapping and rotation of linear nanostructures through a T-Matrix formalism, accurately reproduce the measured data, providing a comprehensive description of the trapping and rotation dynamics.