• We present an updated, optimized version of GAME (GAlaxy Machine learning for Emission lines), a code designed to infer key interstellar medium physical properties from emission line intensities of UV/optical/far infrared galaxy spectra. The improvements concern: (a) an enlarged spectral library including Pop III stars; (b) the inclusion of spectral noise in the training procedure, and (c) an accurate evaluation of uncertainties. We extensively validate the optimized code and compare its performance against empirical methods and other available emission line codes (PYQZ and HII-CHI-MISTRY) on a sample of 62 SDSS stacked galaxy spectra and 75 observed HII regions. Very good agreement is found for metallicity. However, ionization parameters derived by GAME tend to be higher. We show that this is due to the use of too limited libraries in the other codes. The main advantages of GAME are the simultaneous use of all the measured spectral lines, and the extremely short computational times. We finally discuss the code potential and limitations.
  • Following the first two annual intensity mapping workshops at Stanford in March 2016 and Johns Hopkins in June 2017, we report on the recent advances in theory, instrumentation and observation that were presented in these meetings and some of the opportunities and challenges that were identified looking forward. With preliminary detections of CO, [CII], Lya and low-redshift 21cm, and a host of experiments set to go online in the next few years, the field is rapidly progressing on all fronts, with great anticipation for a flood of new exciting results. This current snapshot provides an efficient reference for experts in related fields and a useful resource for nonspecialists. We begin by introducing the concept of line-intensity mapping and then discuss the broad array of science goals that will be enabled, ranging from the history of star formation, reionization and galaxy evolution to measuring baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshift and constraining theories of dark matter, modified gravity and dark energy. After reviewing the first detections reported to date, we survey the experimental landscape, presenting the parameters and capabilities of relevant instruments such as COMAP, mmIMe, AIM-CO, CCAT-p, TIME, CONCERTO, CHIME, HIRAX, HERA, STARFIRE, MeerKAT/SKA and SPHEREx. Finally, we describe recent theoretical advances: different approaches to modeling line luminosity functions, several techniques to separate the desired signal from foregrounds, statistical methods to analyze the data, and frameworks to generate realistic intensity map simulations.
  • In the light of the recent Planck downward revision of the electron scattering optical depth, and of the discovery of a faint AGN population at $z > 4$, we reassess the actual contribution of quasars to cosmic reionization. To this aim, we extend our previous MCMC-based data-constrained semi-analytic reionization model and study the role of quasars on global reionization history. We find that, the quasars can alone reionize the Universe only for models with very high AGN emissivities at high redshift. These models are still allowed by the recent CMB data and most of the observations related to HI reionization. However, they predict an extended and early HeII reionization ending at $z\gtrsim4$ and a much slower evolution in the mean HeII Ly-$\alpha$ forest opacity than what the actual observation suggests. Thus when we further constrain our model against the HeII Ly-$\alpha$ forest data, this AGN-dominated scenario is found to be clearly ruled out at 2-$\sigma$ limits. The data seems to favour a standard two-component picture where quasar contributions become negligible at $z\gtrsim6$ and a non-zero escape fraction of $\sim10\%$ is needed from early-epoch galaxies. For such models, mean neutral hydrogen fraction decreases to $\sim10^{-4}$ at $z=6.2$ from $\sim0.8$ at $z=10.0$ and helium becomes doubly ionized at much later time, $z\sim3$. We find that, these models are as well in good agreement with the observed thermal evolution of IGM as opposed to models with very high AGN emissivities.
  • We study the photoevaporation of molecular clumps exposed to a UV radiation field including hydrogen-ionizing photons ($h\nu > 13.6$ eV) produced by massive stars or quasars. We follow the propagation and collision of shock waves inside clumps and take into account self-shielding effects, determining the evolution of clump size and density with time. The structure of the ionization-photodissociation region (iPDR) is obtained for different initial clump masses ($M=0.01 - 10^4\,{\rm M}_\odot$) and impinging fluxes ($G_0=10^2 - 10^5$ in units of the Habing flux). The cases of molecular clumps engulfed in the HII region of an OB star and clumps carried within quasar outflows are treated separately. We find that the clump undergoes in both cases an initial shock-contraction phase and a following expansion phase, which lets the radiation penetrate in until the clump is completely evaporated. Typical evaporation time-scales are $\simeq 0.01$ Myr in the stellar case and 0.1 Myr in the quasar case, where the clump mass is 0.1 ${\rm M}_\odot$ and $10^3\,{\rm M}_\odot$ respectively. We find that clump lifetimes in quasar outflows are compatible with their observed extension, suggesting that photoevaporation is the main mechanism regulating the size of molecular outflows.
  • We investigate quasar outflows at $z \geq 6$ by performing zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. By employing the SPH code GADGET-3, we zoom in the $2 R_{200}$ region around a $2 \times 10^{12} M_{\odot}$ halo at $z = 6$, inside a $(500 ~ {\rm Mpc})^3$ comoving volume. We compare the results of our AGN runs with a control simulation in which only stellar/SN feedback is considered. Seeding $10^5 M_{\odot}$ BHs at the centers of $10^{9} M_{\odot}$ halos, we find the following results. BHs accrete gas at the Eddington rate over $z = 9 - 6$. At $z = 6$, our most-massive BH has grown to $M_{\rm BH} = 4 \times 10^9 M_{\odot}$. Fast ($v_{r} > 1000$ km/s), powerful ($\dot{M}_{\rm out} \sim 2000 M_{\odot}$/yr) outflows of shock-heated low-density gas form at $z \sim 7$, and propagate up to hundreds kpc. Star-formation is quenched over $z = 8 - 6$, and the total SFR (SFR surface density near the galaxy center) is reduced by a factor of $5$ ($1000$). We analyse the relative contribution of multiple physical process: (i) disrupting cosmic filamentary cold gas inflows, (ii) reducing central gas density, (iii) ejecting gas outside the galaxy; and find that AGN feedback has the following effects at $z = 6$. The inflowing gas mass fraction is reduced by $\sim 12 \%$, the high-density gas fraction is lowered by $\sim 13 \%$, and $\sim 20 \%$ of the gas outflows at a speed larger than the escape velocity ($500$ km/s). We conclude that quasar-host galaxies at $z \geq 6$ are accreting non-negligible amount of cosmic gas, nevertheless AGN feedback quenches their star formation dominantly by powerful outflows ejecting gas out of the host galaxy halo.
  • Cosmic rays (CRs) govern the energetics of present-day galaxies and might have also played a pivotal role during the Epoch of Reionization. In particular, energy deposition by low-energy ($E \lesssim 10$ MeV) CRs accelerated by the first supernovae, might have heated and ionized the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) well before ($z \approx 20$) it was reionized, significantly adding to the similar effect by X-rays or dark matter annihilations. Using a simple, but physically motivated reionization model, and a thorough implementation of CR energy losses, we show that CRs contribute negligibly to IGM ionization, but heat it substantially, raising its temperature by $\Delta T=10-200$ K by $z=10$, depending on the CR injection spectrum. Whether this IGM pre-heating is uniform or clustered around the first galaxies depends on CR diffusion, in turn governed by the efficiency of self-confinement due to plasma streaming instabilities that we discuss in detail. This aspect is crucial to interpret future HI 21 cm observations which can be used to gain unique information on the strength and structure of early intergalactic magnetic fields, and the efficiency of CR acceleration by the first supernovae.
  • Direct collapse black holes (DCBHs) are excellent candidates as seeds of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) observed at $z \gsim 6$. The formation of a DCBH requires a strong external radiation field to suppress $\rm H_2$ formation and cooling in a collapsing gas cloud. Such strong field is not easily achieved by first stars or normal star-forming galaxies. Here we investigate a scenario in which the previously-formed DCBH can provide the necessary radiation field for the formation of additional ones. Using one-zone model and the simulated DCBH Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) filtered through absorbing gas initially having column density $N_{\rm H}$, we derive the critical field intensity, $J_{\rm LW}^{\rm crit}$, to suppress $\rm H_2$ formation and cooling. For the SED model with $N_{\rm H}=1.3\times10^{25}$ cm$^{-2}$, $8.0\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $5.0\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$, we obtain $J_{\rm LW}^{\rm crit}\approx22$, 35 and 54, all much smaller than the critical field intensity for normal star-forming galaxies ($J_{\rm LW}^{\rm crit}\simgt 1000$). X-ray photons from previously-formed DCBHs build up a high-$z$ X-ray background (XRB) that may boost the $J_{\rm LW}^{\rm crit}$. However, we find that in the three SED models $J_{\rm LW}^{\rm crit}$ only increases to $\approx80$, 170 and 390 respectively even when $\dt{\rho}_\bullet$ reaches the maximum value allowed by the present-day XRB level ($0.22, 0.034, 0.006~M_\odot$yr$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-3}$), still much smaller than the galactic value. Although considering the XRB from first galaxies may further increase $J_{\rm LW}^{\rm crit}$, we conclude that our investigation supports a scenario in which DCBH may be more abundant than predicted by models only including galaxies as external radiation sources.
  • Growing the supermassive black holes (~10^9 Msun) that power the detected luminous, highest redshift quasars (z > 6) from light seeds - the remnants of the first stars - within ~ 1 Gyr of the Big Bang poses a timing challenge for growth models. The formation of massive black hole seeds via direct collapse with initial masses ~ 10^4 - 10^5 Msun alleviates this problem. Physical conditions required to form these massive direct collapse black hole (DCBH) seeds are available in the early universe. These viable DCBH formation sites, satellite halos of star-forming galaxies, merge and acquire a stellar component. These produce a new, transient class of objects at high redshift, Obese Black hole Galaxies (OBGs), where the luminosity produced by accretion onto the black hole outshines the stellar component. Therefore, the OBG stage offers a unique way to discriminate between light and massive initial seeds. We predict the multi-wavelength energy output of OBGs and growing Pop III remnants at a fiducial redshift (z = 9), exploring both standard and slim disk accretion onto the growing central black hole for high and low metallicities of the associated stellar population. With our computed templates, we derive the selection criteria for OBGs, that comprise a pre-selection that eliminates blue sources; followed by color-color cuts ([F_{070W} - F_{220W}] > 0; -0.3 < [F_{200W} - F_{444W}] < 0.3) and when available, a high ratio of X-ray flux to rest-frame optical flux (F_X/F_{444W} >> 1) (Abridged).
  • We present the 78-ks Chandra observations of the $z=6.4$ quasar SDSS J1148+5251. The source is clearly detected in the energy range 0.3-7 keV with 42 counts (with a significance $\gtrsim9\sigma$). The X-ray spectrum is best-fitted by a power-law with photon index $\Gamma=1.9$ absorbed by a gas column density of $\rm N_{\rm H}=2.0^{+2.0}_{-1.5}\times10^{23}\,\rm cm^{-2}$. We measure an intrinsic luminosity at 2-10 keV and 10-40 keV equal to $\sim 1.5\times 10^{45}~\rm erg~s^{-1}$, comparable with luminous local and intermediate-redshift quasar properties. Moreover, the X-ray to optical power-law slope value ($\alpha_{\rm OX}=-1.76\pm 0.14$) of J1148 is consistent with the one found in quasars with similar rest-frame 2500 \AA ~luminosity ($L_{\rm 2500}\sim 10^{32}~\rm erg~s^{-1}$\AA$^{-1}$). Then we use Chandra data to test a physically motivated model that computes the intrinsic X-ray flux emitted by a quasar starting from the properties of the powering black hole and assuming that X-ray emission is attenuated by intervening, metal-rich ($Z\geq \rm Z_{\odot}$) molecular clouds distributed on $\sim$kpc scales in the host galaxy. Our analysis favors a black hole mass $M_{\rm BH} \sim 3\times 10^9 \rm M_\odot$ and a molecular hydrogen mass $M_{\rm H_2}\sim 2\times 10^{10} \rm M_\odot$, in good agreement with estimates obtained from previous studies. We finally discuss strengths and limits of our analysis.
  • The most massive black holes observed in the Universe weigh up to $\sim 10^{10} \, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$, nearly independent of redshift. Reaching these final masses likely required copious accretion and several major mergers. Employing a dynamical approach, that rests on the role played by a new, relevant physical scale - the transition radius - we provide a theoretical calculation of the maximum mass achievable by a black hole seed that forms in an isolated halo, one that scarcely merged. Incorporating effects at the transition radius and their impact on the evolution of accretion in isolated haloes we are able to obtain new limits for permitted growth. We find that large black hole seeds ($M_{\bullet} \gtrsim 10^4 \, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$) hosted in small isolated halos ($M_h \lesssim 10^9 \, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$) accreting with relatively small radiative efficiencies ($\epsilon \lesssim 0.1$) grow optimally in these circumstances. Moreover, we show that the standard $M_{\bullet}-\sigma$ relation observed at $z \sim 0$ cannot be established in isolated halos at high-$z$, but requires the occurrence of mergers. Since the average limiting mass of black holes formed at $z \gtrsim 10$ is in the range $10^{4-6} \, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$, we expect to observe them in local galaxies as intermediate-mass black holes, when hosted in the rare haloes that experienced only minor or no merging events. Such ancient black holes, formed in isolation with subsequent scant growth, could survive, almost unchanged, until present.
  • The peculiar emission properties of the $z \sim 6.6$ Ly$\alpha$ emitter CR7 have been initially interpreted with the presence of either a direct collapse black hole (DCBH) or a substantial mass of Pop III stars. Instead, updated photometric observations by Bowler et al. (2016) seem to suggest that CR7 is a more standard system. Here we confirm that the original DCBH hypothesis is consistent also with the new data. Using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we reproduce the new IR photometry with two models involving a Compton-thick DCBH of mass $\approx 7 \times 10^6 \, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$ accreting (a) metal-free ($Z=0$) gas with column density $N_H = 8 \times 10^{25} \, \mathrm{cm^{-2}}$, or (b) low-metallicity gas ($Z = 5 \times 10^{-3} \, \mathrm{Z_{\odot}}$) with $N_H = 3 \times 10^{24} \, \mathrm{cm^{-2}}$. The best fit model reproduces the photometric data to within $1 \sigma$. Such metals can be produced by weak star-forming activity occurring after the formation of the DCBH. The main contribution to the Spitzer/IRAC $3.6 \, \mathrm{\mu m}$ photometric band in both models is due to HeI/HeII $\lambda 4714, 4687$ emission lines, while the contribution of [OIII] $\lambda 4959, 5007$ emission lines, if present, is sub-dominant. Spectroscopic observations with JWST will be required to ultimately clarify the nature of CR7.
  • By heating the intergalactic medium (IGM) before reionization, X-rays are expected to play a prominent role in the early Universe. The cosmic 21-cm signal from this "Epoch of Heating" (EoH) could serve as a clean probe of high-energy processes inside the first galaxies. Here we improve on prior estimates of this signal by using high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to calculate the X-ray absorption due to the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. X-rays absorbed inside the host galaxy are unable to escape into the IGM and contribute to the EoH. We find that the X-ray opacity through these galaxies can be approximated by a metal-free ISM with a typical column density of log[N / cm^-2] = 21.4 +0.40-0.65. We compute the resulting 21-cm signal by combining these ISM opacities with public spectra of high-mass X-ray binaries (thought to be important X-ray sources in the early Universe). Our results support "standard scenarios" in which the X-ray heating of the IGM is inhomogeneous, and occurs before the bulk of reionization. The large-scale (k ~ 0.1/Mpc) 21-cm power reaches a peak of ~100 mK^2 at z = 10 - 15, with the redshift depending on the cosmic star formation history. This is in contrast to some recent work, motivated by the much larger X-ray absorption towards local HMXBs inside the Milky Way. Our main results can be reproduced by approximating the X-ray emission from HMXBs with a power-law spectrum with energy index alpha = 1, truncated at energies below 0.5 keV.
  • We present the results of ALMA spectroscopic follow-up of a $z=6.765$ Lyman-$\alpha$ emitting galaxy behind the cluster RXJ1347-1145. We report the detection of [CII]158$\mu$m line fully consistent with the Lyman-$\alpha$ redshift and with the peak of the optical emission. Given the magnification of $\mu=5.0 \pm 0.3$ the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) luminosity of the [CII] line is $L_{[CII]} =1.4^{+0.2}_{-0.3} \times 10^7L_{\odot}$, which is ${\sim}5$ times fainter than other detections of $z\sim 7$ galaxies. The result indicates that low $L_{[CII]}$ in $z\sim 7$ galaxies compared to the local counterparts might be caused by their low metallicities and/or feedback. The small velocity off-set ($\Delta v = 20_{-40}^{+140} \rm km/s$) between the Lyman-$\alpha$ and [CII] line is unusual, and may be indicative of ionizing photons escaping.
  • We study the redshift evolution of the quasar UV Luminosity Function (LF) for 0.5 < z < 6.5, by collecting the most up to date observational data and, in particular, the recently discovered population of faint AGNs. We fit the QSO LF using either a double power-law or a Schechter function, finding that both forms provide good fits to the data. We derive empirical relations for the LF parameters as a function of redshift and, based on these results, predict the quasar UV LF at z=8. From the inferred LF evolution, we compute the redshift evolution of the QSO/AGN comoving ionizing emissivity and hydrogen photoionization rate. If faint AGNs are included, the contribution of quasars to reionization increases substantially. However, their level of contribution critically depends on the detailed shape of the QSO LF, which can be constrained by efficient searches of high-z quasars. To this aim, we predict the expected (i) number of z>6 quasars detectable by ongoing and future NIR surveys (as EUCLID and WFIRST), and (ii) number counts for a single radio-recombination line observation with SKA-MID (FoV = 0.49 deg^2) as a function of the Hnalpha flux density, at 0<z<8. These surveys (even at z<6) will be fundamental to better constrain the role of quasars as reionization sources.
  • We present a new approach based on Supervised Machine Learning (SML) algorithms to infer key physical properties of galaxies (density, metallicity, column density and ionization parameter) from their emission line spectra. We introduce a numerical code (called GAME, GAlaxy Machine learning for Emission lines) implementing this method and test it extensively. GAME delivers excellent predictive performances, especially for estimates of metallicity and column densities. We compare GAME with the most widely used diagnostics (e.g. R$_{23}$, [NII]$\lambda$6584 / H$\alpha$ indicators) showing that it provides much better accuracy and wider applicability range. GAME is particularly suitable for use in combination with Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy, both for rest-frame optical/UV nebular lines and far-infrared/sub-mm lines arising from Photo-Dissociation Regions. Finally, GAME can also be applied to the analysis of synthetic galaxy maps built from numerical simulations.
  • We study the origin of the cold molecular clumps in quasar outflows, recently detected in CO and HCN emission. We first describe the physical properties of such radiation-driven outflows and show that a transition from a momentum- to an energy-driven flow must occur at a radial distance of R ~ 0.25 kpc. During this transition, the shell of swept up material fragments due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, but these clumps contain little mass and are likely to be rapidly ablated by the hot gas in which they are immersed. We then explore an alternative scenario in which clumps form from thermal instabilities at R >~ 1 kpc, possibly containing enough dust to catalyze molecule formation. We investigate this processes with 3D two-fluid (gas+dust) numerical simulations of a kpc^3 patch of the outflow, including atomic and dust cooling, thermal conduction, dust sputtering, and photoionization from the QSO radiation field. In all cases, dust grains are rapidly destroyed in ~10,000 years; and while some cold clumps form at later times, they are present only as transient features, which disappear as cooling becomes more widespread. In fact, we only find a stable two-phase medium with dense clumps if we artificially enhance the QSO radiation field by a factor 100. This result, together with the complete destruction of dust grains, renders the interpretation of molecular outflows a very challenging problem.
  • Recent measurements of the Luminosity Function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, $z\gsim6$) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass halos can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically-motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parameterization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude $\sim -9$. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in halos with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s$^{-1}$, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude $\sim -15$, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at $z\sim5$. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than $\sim -13$ and smaller than $\sim - 8$ are typically older. Hence, the stellar age - UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.
  • The detection of quasars at $z>6$ unveils the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs) of a few billion solar masses. The rapid formation process of these extreme objects remains a fascinating and open issue. Such discovery implies that seed black holes must have formed early on, and grown via either rapid accretion or BH/galaxy mergers. In this theoretical review, we discuss in detail various BH seed formation mechanisms and the physical processes at play during their assembly. We discuss the three most popular BH formation scenarios, involving the (i) core-collapse of massive stars, (ii) dynamical evolution of dense nuclear star clusters, (iii) collapse of a protogalactic metal free gas cloud. This article aims at giving a broad introduction and an overview of the most advanced research in the field.
  • With the aim of understanding the coevolution of star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass (M*), and oxygen abundance (O/H) in galaxies up to redshift z=3.7, we have compiled the largest available dataset for studying Metallicity Evolution and Galaxy Assembly (MEGA); it comprises roughly 1000 galaxies with a common O/H calibration and spans almost two orders of magnitude in metallicity, a factor of 10^6 in SFR, and a factor of 10^5 in stellar mass. From a Principal Component Analysis, we find that the 3-dimensional parameter space reduces to a Fundamental Plane of Metallicity (FPZ) given by 12+log(O/H) = -0.14 log (SFR) + 0.37 log (M*) + 4.82. The mean O/H FPZ residuals are small (0.16 dex) and consistent with trends found in smaller galaxy samples with more limited ranges in M*, SFR, and O/H. Importantly, the FPZ is found to be redshift-invariant within the uncertainties. In a companion paper, these results are interpreted with an updated version of the model presented by Dayal et al. (2013).
  • Recent work suggests that galaxy evolution, and the build-up of stellar mass (M*) over cosmic time, is characterized by changes with redshift of star formation rate (SFR) and oxygen abundance (O/H). In a companion paper, we have compiled a large dataset to study Metallicity Evolution and Galaxy Assembly (MEGA), consisting of roughly 1000 galaxies to z=3.7 with a common O/H calibration. Here we interpret the MEGA scaling relations of M*, SFR, and O/H with an updated version of the model presented by Dayal et al. (2013). This model successfully reproduces the observed O/H ratio of 80,000 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to within 0.05-0.06 dex. By extending the model to the higher redshift MEGA sample, we find that although the specific mass loading of outflows does not change measurably during the evolution, the accretion rate and gas content of galaxies increase significantly with redshift. These two effects can explain, either separately or possibly in tandem, the observed lower metal abundance of high-z galaxies.
  • Dust growth via accretion of gas species has been proposed as the dominant process to increase the amount of dust in galaxies. We show here that this hypothesis encounters severe difficulties that make it unfit to explain the observed UV and IR properties of such systems, particularly at high redshifts. Dust growth in the diffuse ISM phases is hampered by (a) too slow accretion rates; (b) too high dust temperatures, and (c) the Coulomb barrier that effectively blocks accretion. In molecular clouds these problems are largely alleviated. Grains are cold (but not colder than the CMB temperature, (Tcmb = 20 K at redshift z=6). However, in dense environments accreted materials form icy water mantles, perhaps with impurities. Mantles are immediately photo-desorbed as grains return to the diffuse ISM at the end of the cloud lifetime, thus erasing any memory of the growth. We conclude that dust attenuating stellar light at high-$z$ must be ready-made stardust largely produced in supernova ejecta.
  • Line intensity mapping is a superb tool to study the collective radiation from early galaxies. However, the method is hampered by the presence of strong foregrounds, mostly produced by low-redshift interloping lines. We present here a general method to overcome this problem which is robust against foreground residual noise and based on the cross-correlation function $\psi_{\alpha L}(r)$ between diffuse line emission and Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAE). We compute the diffuse line (Ly$\alpha$ is used as an example) emission from galaxies in a $(800{\rm Mpc})^3$ box at $z = 5.7$ and $6.6$. We divide the box in slices and populate them with $14000(5500)$ LAEs at $z = 5.7(6.6)$, considering duty cycles from $10^{-3}$ to $1$. Both the LAE number density and slice volume are consistent with the expected outcome of the Subaru HSC survey. We add gaussian random noise with variance $\sigma_{\rm N}$ up to 100 times the variance of the Ly$\alpha$ emission, $\sigma_\alpha$, to simulate foregrounds and compute $\psi_{\alpha L}(r)$. We find that the signal-to-noise of the observed $\psi_{\alpha L}(r)$ does not change significantly if $\sigma_{\rm N} \le 10 \sigma_\alpha$ and show that in these conditions the mean line intensity, $I_{Ly\alpha}$, can be precisely recovered independently of the LAE duty cycle. Even if $\sigma_{\rm N} = 100 \sigma_\alpha$, $I_\alpha$ can be constrained within a factor $2$. The method works equally well for any other line (e.g. HI 21 cm, [CII], HeII) used for the intensity mapping experiment.
  • Intensity mapping (IM) is sensitive to the cumulative line emission of galaxies. As such it represents a promising technique for statistical studies of galaxies fainter than the limiting magnitude of traditional galaxy surveys. The strong hydrogen Ly-alpha line is the primary target for such an experiment, as its intensity is linked to star formation activity and the physical state of the interstellar (ISM) and intergalactic (IGM) medium. However, to extract the meaningful information one has to solve the confusion problems caused by interloping lines from foreground galaxies. We discuss here the challenges for a Ly-alpha IM experiment targeting z > 4 sources. We find that the Ly-alpha power spectrum can be in principle easily (marginally) obtained with a 40 cm space telescope in a few days of observing time up to z < 8 (z = 10) assuming that the interloping lines (e.g. H-alpha, [O II], [O III] lines) can be efficiently removed. We show that interlopers can be removed by using an ancillary photometric galaxy survey with limiting AB mag 26 in the NIR bands (Y, J, H, or K). This would enable detection of the Ly-alpha signal from 5 < z < 9 faint sources. However, if a [C II] IM experiment is feasible, by cross-correlating the Ly-alpha with the [C II] signal the required depth of the galaxy survey can be decreased to AB mag 24. This would bring the detection at reach of future facilities working in close synergy.
  • The first black hole seeds, formed when the Universe was younger than 500 Myr, are recognized to play an important role for the growth of early (z ~ 7) super-massive black holes. While progresses have been made in understanding their formation and growth, their observational signatures remain largely unexplored. As a result, no detection of such sources has been confirmed so far. Supported by numerical simulations, we present a novel photometric method to identify black hole seed candidates in deep multi-wavelength surveys. We predict that these highly-obscured sources are characterized by a steep spectrum in the infrared (1.6-4.5 micron), i.e. by very red colors. The method selects the only 2 objects with a robust X-ray detection found in the CANDELS/GOODS-S survey with a photometric redshift z > 6. Fitting their infrared spectra only with a stellar component would require unrealistic star formation rates (>2000 solar masses per year). To date, the selected objects represent the most promising black hole seed candidates, possibly formed via the direct collapse black hole scenario, with predicted mass >10^5 solar masses. While this result is based on the best photometric observations of high-z sources available to date, additional progress is expected from spectroscopic and deeper X-ray data. Upcoming observatories, like the JWST, will greatly expand the scope of this work.
  • Emission from high-$z$ galaxies must unquestionably contribute to the near-infrared background (NIRB). However, this contribution has so far proven difficult to isolate even after subtracting the resolved galaxies to deep levels. Remaining NIRB fluctuations are dominated by unresolved low-$z$ galaxies on small angular scales, and by an unidentified component with unclear origin on large scales ($\approx 1000''$). In this paper, by analyzing mock maps generated from semi-numerical simulations and empirically determined $L_{\rm UV} - M_{\rm h}$ relations, we find that fluctuations associated with galaxies at $5 < z < 10$ amount to several percent of the unresolved NIRB flux fluctuations. We investigate the properties of this component for different survey areas and limiting magnitudes. In all cases, we show that this signal can be efficiently, and most easily at small angular scales, isolated by cross-correlating the source-subtracted NIRB with Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) detected in the same field by {\tt HST} surveys. This result provides a fresh insight into the properties of reionization sources.