• We combine parallaxes from the first Gaia data release with the spectrophotometric distance estimation framework for stars in the fifth RAVE survey data release. The combined distance estimates are more accurate than either determination in isolation - uncertainties are on average two times smaller than for RAVE-only distances (three times smaller for dwarfs), and 1.4 times smaller than TGAS parallax uncertainties (two times smaller for giants). We are also able to compare the estimates from spectrophotometry to those from Gaia, and use this to assess the reliability of both catalogues and improve our distance estimates. We find that the distances to the lowest log g stars are, on average, overestimated and caution that they may not be reliable. We also find that it is likely that the Gaia random uncertainties are smaller than the reported values. As a byproduct we derive ages for the RAVE stars, many with relative uncertainties less than 20 percent. These results for 219566 RAVE sources have been made publicly available, and we encourage their use for studies that combine the radial velocities provided by RAVE with the proper motions provided by Gaia. A sample that we believe to be reliable can be found by taking only the stars with the flag notification flag_any=0
  • We explore the connections between stellar age, chemistry, and kinematics across a Galactocentric distance of $7.5 < R\,(\mathrm{kpc}) < 9.0$, using a sample of $\sim 12\,000$ intermediate-mass (FGK) turnoff stars observed with the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey. The kinematics of this sample are determined using radial velocity measurements from RAVE, and parallax and proper motion measurements from the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). In addition, ages for RAVE stars are determined using a Bayesian method, taking TGAS parallaxes as a prior. We divide our sample into young ($0 < \tau < 3$ Gyr) and old ($8 < \tau < 13$ Gyr) populations, and then consider different metallicity bins for each of these age groups. We find significant differences in kinematic trends of young and old, metal-poor and metal-rich, stellar populations. In particular, we find a strong metallicity dependence in the mean Galactocentric radial velocity as a function of radius ($\partial {V_{\rm R}}/\partial R$) for young stars, with metal-rich stars having a much steeper gradient than metal-poor stars. For $\partial {V_{\phi}}/\partial R$, young, metal-rich stars significantly lag the LSR with a slightly positive gradient, while metal-poor stars show a negative gradient above the LSR. We interpret these findings as correlations between metallicity and the relative contributions of the non-axisymmetries in the Galactic gravitational potential (the spiral arms and the bar) to perturb stellar orbits.
  • Detailed elemental abundance patterns of metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -1~dex) stars in the Galactic bulge indicate that a number of them are consistent with globular cluster (GC) stars and may be former members of dissolved GCs. This would indicate that a few per cent of the Galactic bulge was built up from destruction and/or evaporation of globular clusters. Here an attempt is made to identify such presumptive stripped stars originating from the massive, inner Galaxy globular cluster NGC~6441 using its rich RR Lyrae variable star (RRL) population. We present radial velocities of forty RRLs centered on the globular cluster NGC~6441. All of the 13 RRLs observed within the cluster tidal radius have velocities consistent with cluster membership, with an average radial velocity of 24 +- 5~km/s and a star-to-star scatter of 11~km/s. This includes two new RRLs that were previously not associated with the cluster. Eight RRLs with radial velocities consistent with cluster membership but up to three time the distance from the tidal radius are also reported. These potential extra-tidal RRLs also have exceptionally long periods, which is a curious characteristic of the NGC~6441 RRL population that hosts RRLs with periods longer than seen anywhere else in the Milky Way. As expected of stripped cluster stars, most are inline with the cluster's orbit. Therefore, either the tidal radius of NGC~6441 is underestimated and/or we are seeing dissolving cluster stars stemming from NGC~6441 that are building up the old spheroidal bulge.
  • A cold high-velocity (HV, $\sim$ 200 km/s) peak was first reported in several Galactic bulge fields based on the APOGEE commissioning observations. Both the existence and the nature of the high-velocity peak are still under debate. Here we revisit this feature with the latest APOGEE DR13 data. We find that most of the low latitude bulge fields display a skewed Gaussian distribution with a HV shoulder. However, only 3 out of 53 fields show distinct high-velocity peaks around 200 km/s. The velocity distribution can be well described by Gauss-Hermite polynomials, except the three fields showing clear HV peaks. We find that the correlation between the skewness parameter ($h_{3}$) and the mean velocity ($\bar{v}$), instead of a distinctive HV peak, is a strong indicator of the bar. It was recently suggested that the HV peak is composed of preferentially young stars. We choose three fields showing clear HV peaks to test this hypothesis using the metallicity, [$\alpha$/M] and [C/N] as age proxies. We find that both young and old stars show HV features. The similarity between the chemical abundances of stars in the HV peaks and the main component indicates that they are not systematically different in terms of chemical abundance or age. In contrast, there are clear differences in chemical space between stars in the Sagittarius dwarf and the bulge stars. The strong HV peaks off-plane are still to be explained properly, and could be different in nature.
  • The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 square degrees (distributed over ~2400 square degrees at ~20% filling factor) to ~24th mag in ugriz with the goal of identifying broadly distributed, low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds. SMASH will also derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii from the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, PHOTRED, an automated PSF photometry pipeline based mainly on the DAOPHOT suite, and custom calibration software. The attained astrometric precision is ~15 mas and the accuracy is ~2 mas with respect to the Gaia DR1 astrometric reference frame. The photometric precision is ~0.5-0.7% in griz and ~1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ~1.3% in all bands. The median 5 sigma point source depths in ugriz bands are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, 23.5 mag. The SMASH data already have been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and very extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R~18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ~100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access, including a data discovery tool, SMASH database access, an image cutout service, and a Jupyter notebook server with example notebooks for exploratory analysis.
  • Star clusters, particularly those objects in the disk-bulge-halo interface are as of yet poorly charted, albeit carrying important information about the formation and the structure of the Milky Way. Here, we present a detailed chemical abundance study of the recently discovered object Gaia 1. Photometry has previously suggested it as an intermediate-age, moderately metal-rich system, although the exact values for its age and metallicity remained ambiguous in the literature. We measured detailed chemical abundances of 14 elements in four red giant members, from high-resolution (R=25000) spectra that firmly establish Gaia 1 as an object associated with the thick disk. The resulting mean Fe abundance is $-0.62\pm$0.03(stat.)$\pm$0.10(sys.) dex, which is more metal-poor than indicated by previous spectroscopy from the literature, but it is fully in line with values from isochrone fitting. We find that Gaia 1 is moderately enhanced in the $\alpha$-elements, which allowed us to consolidate its membership with the thick disk via chemical tagging. The cluster's Fe-peak and neutron-capture elements are similar to those found across the metal-rich disks, where the latter indicate some level of $s$-process activity. No significant spread in iron nor in other heavy elements was detected, whereas we find evidence of light-element variations in Na, Mg, and Al. Nonetheless, the traditional Na-O and Mg-Al (anti-)correlations, typically seen in old globular clusters, are not seen in our data. This confirms that Gaia 1 is rather a massive and luminous open cluster than a low-mass globular cluster. Finally, orbital computations of the target stars bolster our chemical findings of Gaia 1's present-day membership with the thick disk, even though it remains unclear, which mechanisms put it in that place.
  • Star clusters are invaluable tracers of the Galactic components and the discovery and characterization of low-mass stellar systems can be used to appraise their prevailing disruption mechanisms and time scales. However, owing to the significant foreground contamination, high extinction, and still uncharted interfaces of the underlying Milky Way components, objects at low Galactic latitudes are notoriously difficult to characterize. Here, we present the first spectroscopic campaign to identify the chemodynamical properties of the low-latitude star cluster FSR 1716. While its photometric age and distance are far from settled, the presence of RR Lyrae variables indicates a rather old cluster variety. Using medium-resolution (R$\sim$10600) calcium triplet (CaT) spectroscopy obtained with the wide-field multi-fibre AAOmega instrument, we identified six member candidates with a mean velocity of $-30$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of 2.5$\pm$0.9 km s$^{-1}$. The latter value implies a dynamic mass of $\sim$1.3$\times$10$^4$ M$_{\odot}$, typical of a low-mass globular cluster. Combined with our derived CaT metallicity of $-1.38\pm0.20$ dex, this object is finally confirmed as an old, metal-poor globular cluster.
  • We characterize the absolute magnitudes and colors of RR Lyrae stars in the globular cluster M5 in the ugriz filter system of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We provide empirical Period-Luminosity (P-L) relationships in all 5 bands based on 47 RR Lyrae stars of the type ab and 14 stars of the type c. The P-L relationships were found to be better constrained for the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars in the riz passbands, with dispersion of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.02 magnitudes, respectively. The dispersion of the color at minimum light was found to be small, supporting the use of this parameter as a means to obtain accurate interstellar extinctions along the line of sight up to the distance of the RR Lyrae star. We found a trend of color at minimum light with pulsational period that, if taken into account, brings the dispersion in color at minimum light to < 0.016 magnitudes for the (r-i), (i-z), and (r-z) colors. These calibrations will be very useful for using RR Lyrae stars from DECam observations as both standard candles for distance determinations and color standards for reddening measurements.
  • The new data release (DR5) of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) includes radial velocities of 520,781 spectra of 457,588 individual stars, of which 215,590 individual stars are released in the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) in Gaia DR1. Therefore, RAVE contains the largest TGAS overlap of the recent and ongoing Milky Way spectroscopic surveys. Most of the RAVE stars also contain stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), as well as individual abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni. Combining RAVE with TGAS brings the uncertainties in space velocities down by a factor of 2 for stars in the RAVE volume -- 10 km/s uncertainties in space velocities are now able to be derived for the majority (70%) of the RAVE-TGAS sample, providing a powerful platform for chemo-dynamic analyses of the Milky Way. Here we discuss the RAVE-TGAS impact on Galactic archaeology as well as how the Gaia parallaxes can be used to break degeneracies within the RAVE spectral regime for an even better return in the derivation of stellar parameters and abundances.
  • Globular clusters (GCs) are amongst the oldest objects in the Galaxy and play a pivotal role in deciphering its early history. We present the first spectroscopic study of the GC ESO452-SC11 using the AAOmega spectrograph at medium resolution. Given the sparsity of this object and high degree of foreground contamination due to its location toward the bulge, few details are known for this cluster: there is no consensus of its age, metallicity, or its association with the disk or bulge. We identify 5 members based on radial velocity, metallicity, and position within the GC. Using spectral synthesis, accurate abundances of Fe and several $\alpha$-, Fe-peak, neutron-capture elements (Si,Ca,Ti,Cr,Co,Ni,Sr,Eu) were measured. Two of the 5 cluster candidates are likely non-members, as they have deviant Fe abundances and [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios. The mean radial velocity is 19$\pm$2 km s$^{-1}$ with a low dispersion of 2.8$\pm$3.4 km s$^{-1}$, in line with its low mass. The mean Fe-abundance from spectral fitting is $-0.88\pm0.03$, with a spread driven by observational errors. The $\alpha$-elements of the GC candidates are marginally lower than expected for the bulge at similar metallicities. As spectra of hundreds of stars were collected in a 2 degree field around ESO452-SC11, detailed abundances in the surrounding field were measured. Most non-members have higher [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios, typical of the nearby bulge population. Stars with measured Fe-peak abundances show a large scatter around Solar values, though with large uncertainties. Our study provides the first systematic measurement of Sr in a Galactic bulge GC. The Eu and Sr abundances of the GC candidates are consistent with a disk or bulge association. Our calculations place ESO452 on an elliptical orbit in the central 3 kpc of the bulge. We find no evidence of extratidal stars in our data. (Abridged)
  • We characterize the selection function of RAVE using 2MASS as our underlying population, which we assume represents all stars which could have potentially been observed. We evaluate the completeness fraction as a function of position, magnitude, and color in two ways: first, on a field-by-field basis, and second, in equal-size areas on the sky. Then, we consider the effect of the RAVE stellar parameter pipeline on the final resulting catalogue, which in principle limits the parameter space over which our selection function is valid. Our final selection function is the product of the completeness fraction and the selection function of the pipeline. We then test if the application of the selection function introduces biases in the derived parameters. To do this, we compare a parent mock catalogue generated using Galaxia with a mock-RAVE catalogue where the selection function of RAVE has been applied. We conclude that for stars brighter than I = 12, between $4000 \rm K < T_{\rm eff} < 8000 \rm K$ and $0.5 < \rm{log}\,g < 5.0$, RAVE is kinematically and chemically unbiased with respect to expectations from Galaxia.
  • Data Release 5 (DR5) of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the fifth data release from a magnitude-limited (9< I < 12) survey of stars randomly selected in the southern hemisphere. The RAVE medium-resolution spectra ($R\sim7500$) covering the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795\AA) span the complete time frame from the start of RAVE observations in 2003 to their completion in 2013. Radial velocities from 520,781 spectra of 457,588 unique stars are presented, of which 255,922 stellar observations have parallaxes and proper motions from the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) in Gaia DR1. For our main DR5 catalog, stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and overall metallicity) are computed using the RAVE DR4 stellar pipeline, but calibrated using recent K2 Campaign 1 seismic gravities and Gaia benchmark stars, as well as results obtained from high-resolution studies. Also included are temperatures from the Infrared Flux Method, and we provide a catalogue of red giant stars in the dereddened color $(J-Ks)_0$ interval (0.50,0.85) for which the gravities were calibrated based only on seismology. Further data products for sub-samples of the RAVE stars include individual abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and distances found using isochrones. Each RAVE spectrum is complemented by an error spectrum, which has been used to determine uncertainties on the parameters. The data can be accessed via the RAVE Web site or the Vizier database.
  • The orbits, atmospheric parameters, chemical abundances, and ages of individual stars in the Milky Way provide the most comprehensive illustration of galaxy formation available. The Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) will deliver astrometric parameters for the largest ever sample of Milky Way stars, though its full potential cannot be realized without the addition of complementary spectroscopy. Among existing spectroscopic surveys, the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has the largest overlap with TGAS ($\gtrsim$200,000 stars). We present a data-driven re-analysis of 520,781 RAVE spectra using The Cannon. For red giants, we build our model using high-fidelity APOGEE stellar parameters and abundances for stars that overlap with RAVE. For main-sequence and sub-giant stars, our model uses stellar parameters from the K2/EPIC. We derive and validate effective temperature $T_{\rm eff}$, surface gravity $\log{g}$, and chemical abundances of up to seven elements (O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ni). We report a total of 1,685,851 elemental abundances with a typical precision of 0.07 dex, a substantial improvement over previous RAVE data releases. The synthesis of RAVE-on and TGAS is the most powerful data set for chemo-dynamic analyses of the Milky Way ever produced.
  • We present 947 radial velocities of RR Lyrae variable stars in four fields located toward the Galactic bulge, observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA-RR). We show that these RR Lyrae stars exhibit hot kinematics and null or negligible rotation and are therefore members of a separate population from the bar/pseudobulge that currently dominates the mass and luminosity of the inner Galaxy. Our RR Lyrae stars predate these structures, and have metallicities, kinematics, and spatial distribution that are consistent with a "classical" bulge, although we cannot yet completely rule out the possibility that they are the metal-poor tail of a more metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ -1 dex) halo-bulge population. The complete catalog of radial velocities for the BRAVA-RR stars is also published electronically.
  • Low-mass, variable, high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic centre. Wide-area surveys like APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities larger than 350 km/s. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass, RR Lyrae star, located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~ -400 km/s. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derive abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allow us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, combining its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances suggests that the star was accelerated from the outskirts of the inner (or even outer) halo during many-body interactions. Other possible origins include the bulge itself, or the star could be stripped from a star cluster or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy when it merged with the Milky Way.
  • We investigate interstellar extinction curve variations toward $\sim$4 deg$^{2}$ of the inner Milky Way in $VIJK_{s}$ photometry from the OGLE-III and $VVV$ surveys, with supporting evidence from diffuse interstellar bands and $F435W,F625W$ photometry. We obtain independent measurements toward $\sim$2,000 sightlines of $A_{I}$, $E(V-I)$, $E(I-J)$, and $E(J-K_{s})$, with median precision and accuracy of 2%. We find that the variations in the extinction ratios $A_{I}/E(V-I)$, $E(I-J)/E(V-I)$ and $E(J-K_{s})/E(V-I)$ are large (exceeding 20%), significant, and positively correlated, as expected. However, both the mean values and the trends in these extinction ratios are drastically shifted from the predictions of Cardelli and Fitzpatrick, regardless of how $R_{V}$ is varied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that variations in the shape of the extinction curve has at least two degrees of freedom, and not one (e.g. $R_{V}$), which we conform with a principal component analysis. We derive a median value of $<A_{V}/A_{Ks}>=13.44$, which is $\sim$60% higher than the "standard" value. We show that the Wesenheit magnitude $W_{I}=I-1.61(I-J)$ is relatively impervious to extinction curve variations. Given that these extinction curves are linchpins of observational cosmology, and that it is generally assumed that $R_{V}$ variations correctly capture variations in the extinction curve, we argue that systematic errors in the distance ladder from studies of type Ia supernovae and Cepheids may have been underestimated. Moreover, the reddening maps from the Planck experiment are shown to systematically overestimate dust extinction by $\sim$100%, and lack sensitivity to extinction curve variations.
  • We report on the RR Lyrae variable star, MACHO 176.18833.411, located toward the Galactic bulge and observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA-RR), which has the unusual radial velocity of -372 +- 8 km/s and true space velocity of -482 +- 22 km/s relative to the Galactic rest frame. Located less than 1 kpc from the Galactic center and toward a field at (l,b)=(3,-2.5), this pulsating star has properties suggesting it belongs to the bulge RR Lyrae star population yet a velocity indicating it is abnormal, at least with respect to bulge giants and red clump stars. We show that this star is most likely a halo interloper and therefore suggest that halo contamination is not insignificant when studying metal-poor stars found within the bulge area, even for stars within 1 kpc of the Galactic center. We discuss the possibility that MACHO 176.18833.411 is on the extreme edge of the bulge RR Lyrae radial velocity distribution, and also consider a more exotic scenario in which it is a runaway star moving through the Galaxy.
  • We use the HB morphology of 48 Galactic GCs to study the radial distributions of the different stellar populations known to exist in globular clusters. Assuming that the (extremely) blue HB stars correspond to stars enriched in Helium and light elements, we compare the radial distributions of stars selected according to colour on the HB to trace the distribution of the secondary stellar populations in globular clusters. Unlike other cases, our data show that the populations are well mixed in 80% of the cases studied. This provides some constraints on the mechanisms proposed to pollute the interstellar medium in young globular clusters.
  • We explore the kinematics (both the radial velocity and the proper motion) of the vertical X-shaped feature in the Milky Way with an N-body bar/bulge model. From the solar perspective, the distance distribution of particles is double-peaked in fields passing through the X-shape. The separation and amplitude ratio between the two peaks qualitatively match the observed trends towards the Galactic bulge. We confirm clear signatures of cylindrical rotation in the pattern of mean radial velocity across the bar/bulge region. We also find possible imprints of coherent orbital motion inside the bar structure in the radial velocity distribution along l=0 degree, where the near and far sides of the bar/bulge show excesses of approaching and receding particles. The coherent orbital motion is also reflected in the slight displacement of the zero-velocity-line in the mean radial velocity, and the displacement of the maximum/minimum in the mean longitudinal proper motion across the bulge region. We find some degree of anisotropy in the stellar velocity within the X-shape, but the underlying orbital family of the X-shape cannot be clearly distinguished. Two potential applications of the X-shape in previous literature are tested, i.e., bulge rotation and Galactic center measurements. We find that the proper motion difference between the two sides of the X-shape can be used to estimate the mean azimuthal streaming motion of the bulge, but not the pattern speed of the bar. We also demonstrate that the Galactic center can be located with the X-shape, but the accuracy depends on the fitting scheme, the number of fields, and their latitudinal coverage.
  • We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4m Telescope. The new satellite is compact (r_h = 68 +/- 11 pc) and faint (M_V = -4.8 +/- 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of HydraII in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 +/- 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.
  • Stellar population studies of globular clusters have suggested that the brightest clusters in the Galaxy might actually be the remnant nuclei of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. If the present Galactic globular clusters formed within larger stellar systems, they are likely surrounded by extra-tidal halos and/or tails made up of stars that were tidally stripped from their parent systems. The stellar surroundings around globular clusters are therefore one of the best places to look for the remnants of an ancient dwarf galaxy. Here an attempt is made to search for tidal debris around the supernovae enriched globular clusters M22 and NGC 1851 as well as the kinematically unique cluster NGC 3201. The stellar parameters from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) are used to identify stars with RAVE metallicities, radial velocities and elemental-abundances consistent with the abundance patterns and properties of the stars in M22, NGC 1851 and NGC 3201. The discovery of RAVE stars that may be associated with M22 and NGC 1851 are reported, some of which are at projected distances of ~10 degrees away from the core of these clusters. Numerous RAVE stars associated with NGC 3201 suggest that either the tidal radius of this cluster is underestimated, or that there are some unbound stars extending a few arc minutes from the edge of the cluster's radius. No further extra-tidal stars associated with NGC 3201 could be identified. The bright magnitudes of the RAVE stars make them easy targets for high resolution follow-up observations, allowing an eventual further chemical tagging to solidify (or exclude) stars outside the tidal radius of the cluster as tidal debris. In both our radial velocity histograms of the regions surrounding NGC 1851 and NGC 3201, a peak of stars at 230 km/s is seen, consistent with extended tidal debris from omega Centauri.
  • We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l,b)=(+5.25,-3.02) and (0,-12). The (+5.25,-3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high resolution (R~20,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N>70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the ESO archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did not show strong TiO absorption bands. The present work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H]>-0.5. In particular, the bulge [alpha/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick disk and the Fe-peak elements Co, Ni, and Cu appear enhanced compared to the disk. There is also some evidence that the [Na/Fe] (but not [Al/Fe]) trends between the bulge and local disk may be different at low and high metallicity. We also find that the velocity dispersion decreases as a function of increasing [Fe/H] for both fields, and do not detect any significant cold, high velocity population. A comparison with chemical enrichment models indicates that a significant fraction of hypernovae are required to explain the bulge abundance trends, and that initial mass functions that are steep, top-heavy (and do not include strong outflow), or truncated to avoid including contributions from stars >40 solar masses are ruled out, in particular because of disagreement with the Fe-peak abundance data. [abridged]
  • Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars ($\sim10%$) are in a cold ($\sigma_{\rm V} \approx 30$ km/s) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity $\approx 200$ km/s). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two $N$-body models of the Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance--velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance $\sim8.5 \pm 1$ kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained with geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.
  • Aims. This is the second in a series of papers that attempt to unveil the kinematic structure of the Galactic bulge through studying radial velocities and proper motions. We report here ~15000 new proper motions for three low foreground-extinction off-axis fields of the Galactic bulge. Methods. Proper motions were derived from a combination of Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images taken 8 and 9 years apart, and ACS observations taken 9 and 10 years apart, and they reach accuracies better than 0.9 mas/yr for more than ~10000 objects with magnitudes F814W < 24. Results. The proper motion distributions in these fields are similar to those of Galactic minor axis bulge fields. We observe the rotation of main sequence stars below the turn-off within the Galactic bulge, as in the minor axis fields. Conclusions. Our stellar proper motions measurements show a significant bulge rotation for fields as far from the galactic plane as b=-8.
  • Although more than eight decades have passed since P. Th. Oosterhoff drew attention to differences in the properties of RR Lyrae variables in globular clusters, the origin and significance of the Oosterhoff groups remain unclear. Nonetheless, the accumulation of extensive new observations of RR Lyrae stars in globular clusters of the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies allows a fresh look at the phenomenon. Insights come not only from surveys of variables within the original Oosterhoff groups I and II but also from recent observations of the Oosterhoff-intermediate systems found especially in smaller Local Group galaxies. We will compare properties of RR Lyrae in several systems to investigate what they reveal about system-to-system differences of transition temperature between fundamental-mode and first overtone pulsators and of horizontal branch luminosity. Both transition temperature and horizontal branch luminosity have at various times been credited as playing roles in the creation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy.