• We study the signal from patchy reionization in view of the future high accuracy polarization measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We implement an extraction procedure of the patchy reionization signal analogous to CMB lensing. We evaluate the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the future Stage IV (S4) CMB experiment. The signal has a broad peak centered on the degree angular scales, with a long tail at higher multipoles. The CMB S4 experiment can effectively constrain the properties of reionization by measuring the signal on degree scales. The signal amplitude depends on the properties of the structure determining the reionization morphology. We describe bubbles having radii distributed log-normally. The expected S/N is sensitive to the mean bubble radius: $\bar{R}=5$ Mpc implies $S/N \approx 4$, $\bar{R}=10$ Mpc implies $S/N \approx 20$. The spread of the radii distribution strongly affects the integrated SNR, that changes by a factor of $10^2$ when $\sigma_{lnr}$ goes from $\ln 2$ to $\ln3$. Future CMB experiments will thus place important constraints on the physics of reionization.
  • We use a 200 $h^{-1}Mpc$ a side N-body simulation to study the mass accretion history (MAH) of dark matter halos to be accreted by larger halos, which we call infall halos. We define a quantity $a_{\rm nf}\equiv (1+z_{\rm f})/(1+z_{\rm peak})$ to characterize the MAH of infall halos, where $z_{\rm peak}$ and $z_{\rm f}$ are the accretion and formation redshifts, respectively. We find that, at given $z_{\rm peak}$, their MAH is bimodal. Infall halos are dominated by a young population at high redshift and by an old population at low redshift. For the young population, the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution is narrow and peaks at about $1.2$, independent of $z_{\rm peak}$, while for the old population, the peak position and width of the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution both increases with decreasing $z_{\rm peak}$ and are both larger than those of the young population. This bimodal distribution is found to be closely connected to the two phases in the MAHs of halos. While members of the young population are still in the fast accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$, those of the old population have already entered the slow accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$. This bimodal distribution is not found for the whole halo population, nor is it seen in halo merger trees generated with the extended Press-Schechter formalism. The infall halo population at $z_{\rm peak}$ are, on average, younger than the whole halo population of similar masses identified at the same redshift. We discuss the implications of our findings in connection to the bimodal color distribution of observed galaxies and to the link between central and satellite galaxies.
  • Follow-up observations at high-angular resolution of submillimeter galaxies showed that the single-dish sources are comprised of a blend of several galaxies. Consequently, number counts derived from low and high angular resolution observations are in disagreement. This demonstrates the importance of resolution effects and the need to have realistic simulations to explore them. We built a new 2deg^2 simulation of the extragalactic sky from the far-infrared to the submillimeter. It is based on an updated version of the two star-formation mode galaxy evolution model. Using global galaxy properties, we use the abundance matching technique to populate a dark-matter lightcone and thus simulate the clustering. We produce maps and extract the sources, and show that the limited angular resolution of single-dish instruments have a strong impact on (sub)millimeter continuum observations. Taking into account these resolution effects, we are reproducing a large set of observables, including number counts, redshift distributions, and cosmic infrared background power spectra. Our simulation describes consistently the number counts from single-dish telescopes and interferometers. In particular, at 350 and 500 um, we find that number counts measured by Herschel between 5 and 50 mJy are biased towards high values by a factor 2, and that redshift distributions are biased towards low z. We also show that the clustering has an important impact on the Herschel pixel histogram used to derive number counts from P(D) analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that the large number density of red Herschel sources found in observations but not in models could be an observational artifact caused by the combination of noise, resolution effects, and the steepness of color and flux density distributions. Our simulation (SIDES) is available at http://cesam.lam.fr/sides
  • We investigate the origin, the shape, the scatter, and the cosmic evolution in the observed relationship between specific angular momentum $j_\star$ and the stellar mass $M_\star$ in early-type (ETGs) and late-type galaxies (LTGs). Specifically, we exploit the observed star-formation efficiency and chemical abundance to infer the fraction $f_{\rm inf}$ of baryons that infall toward the central regions of galaxies where star formation can occur. We find $f_{\rm inf}\approx 1$ for LTGs and $\approx 0.4$ for ETGs with an uncertainty of about $0.25$ dex, consistent with a biased collapse. By comparing with the locally observed $j_\star$ vs. $M_\star$ relations for LTGs and ETGs we estimate the fraction $f_j$ of the initial specific angular momentum associated to the infalling gas that is retained in the stellar component: for LTGs we find $f_j\approx 1.11^{+0.75}_{-0.44}$, in line with the classic disc formation picture; for ETGs we infer $f_j\approx 0.64^{+0.20}_{-0.16}$, that can be traced back to a $z<1$ evolution via dry mergers. We also show that the observed scatter in the $j_{\star}$ vs. $M_{\star}$ relation for both galaxy types is mainly contributed by the intrinsic dispersion in the spin parameters of the host dark matter halo. The biased collapse plus mergers scenario implies that the specific angular momentum in the stellar components of ETG progenitors at $z\sim 2$ is already close to the local values, in pleasing agreement with observations. All in all, we argue such a behavior to be imprinted by nature and not nurtured substantially by the environment.
  • The assessment of the relationship between radio continuum luminosity and star formation rate (SFR) is of crucial importance to make reliable predictions for the forthcoming ultra-deep radio surveys and to allow a full exploitation of their results to measure the cosmic star formation history. We have addressed this issue by matching recent accurate determinations of the SFR function up to high redshifts with literature estimates of the 1.4 GHz luminosity functions of star forming galaxies (SFGs). This was done considering two options, proposed in the literature, for the relationship between the synchrotron emission ($L_{\rm synch}$), that dominates at 1.4 GHz, and the SFR: a linear relation with a decline of the $L_{\rm synch}$/SFR ratio at low luminosities or a mildly non-linear relation at all luminosities. In both cases we get good agreement with the observed radio luminosity functions but, in the non-linear case, the deviation from linearity must be small. The luminosity function data are consistent with a moderate increase of the $L_{\rm synch}$/SFR ratio with increasing redshift, indicated by other data sets, although a constant ratio cannot be ruled out. A stronger indication of such increase is provided by recent deep 1.4 GHz counts, down to $\mu$Jy levels. This is in contradiction with models predicting a decrease of that ratio due to inverse Compton cooling of relativistic electrons at high redshifts. Synchrotron losses appear to dominate up to $z\simeq 5$. We have also updated the Massardi et al. (2010) evolutionary model for radio loud AGNs.
  • We present an improved and extended analysis of the cross-correlation between the map of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) lensing potential derived from the \emph{Planck} mission data and the high-redshift galaxies detected by the \emph{Herschel} Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in the photometric redshift range $z_{\rm ph} \ge 1.5$. We compare the results based on the 2013 and 2015 \textit{Planck} datasets, and investigate the impact of different selections of the H-ATLAS galaxy samples. Significant improvements over our previous analysis have been achieved thanks to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the new CMB lensing map recently released by the \textit{Planck} collaboration. The effective galaxy bias parameter, $b$, for the full galaxy sample, derived from a joint analysis of the cross-power spectrum and of the galaxy auto-power spectrum is found to be $b = 3.54^{+0.15}_{-0.14}$. Furthermore, a first tomographic analysis of the cross-correlation signal is implemented, by splitting the galaxy sample into two redshift intervals: $1.5 \le z_{\rm ph} < 2.1$ and $z_{\rm ph}\ge 2.1$. A statistically significant signal was found for both bins, indicating a substantial increase with redshift of the bias parameter: $b=2.89\pm0.23$ for the lower and $b=4.75^{+0.24}_{-0.25}$ for the higher redshift bin. Consistently with our previous analysis we find that the amplitude of the cross correlation signal is a factor of $1.45^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$ higher than expected from the standard $\Lambda$CDM model for the assumed redshift distribution. The robustness of our results against possible systematic effects has been extensively discussed although the tension is mitigated by passing from 4 to 3$\sigma$.
  • We have worked out predictions for the radio counts of star-forming galaxies down to nJy levels, along with redshift distributions down to the detection limits of the phase 1 Square Kilometer Array MID telescope (SKA1-MID) and of its precursors. Such predictions were obtained by coupling epoch dependent star formation rate (SFR) functions with relations between SFR and radio (synchrotron and free-free) emission. The SFR functions were derived taking into account both the dust obscured and the unobscured star-formation, by combining far-infrared (FIR), ultra-violet (UV) and H_alpha luminosity functions up to high redshifts. We have also revisited the South Pole Telescope (SPT) counts of dusty galaxies at 95\,GHz performing a detailed analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). Our results show that the deepest SKA1-MID surveys will detect high-z galaxies with SFRs two orders of magnitude lower compared to Herschel surveys. The highest redshift tails of the distributions at the detection limits of planned SKA1-MID surveys comprise a substantial fraction of strongly lensed galaxies. We predict that a survey down to 0.25 microJy at 1.4 GHz will detect about 1200 strongly lensed galaxies per square degree, at redshifts of up to 10. For about 30% of them the SKA1-MID will detect at least 2 images. The SKA1-MID will thus provide a comprehensive view of the star formation history throughout the re-ionization epoch, unaffected by dust extinction. We have also provided specific predictions for the EMU/ASKAP and MIGHTEE/MeerKAT surveys.
  • We investigate the impact that warm dark matter (WDM) has in terms of 21cm intensity mapping in the post-reionization Universe at z = 3 - 5. We perform hydrodynamic simulations for 5 different models: cold dark matter and WDM with 1,2,3,4 keV (thermal relic) mass and assign the neutral hydrogen a-posteriori using two different methods that both reproduce observations in terms of column density distribution function of neutral hydrogen systems. Contrary to naive expectations, the suppression of power present in the linear and non-linear matter power spectra, results in an increase of power in terms of neutral hydrogen and 21cm power spectra. This is due to the fact that there is a lack of small mass halos in WDM models with respect to cold dark matter: in order to distribute a total amount of neutral hydrogen within the two cosmological models, a larger quantity has to be placed in the most massive halos, that are more biased compared to the cold dark matter cosmology. We quantify this effect and address significance for the telescope SKA1-LOW, including a realistic noise modeling. The results indicate that we will be able to rule out a 4 keV WDM model with 5000 hours of observations at z > 3, with a statistical significance of > 3 sigma, while a smaller mass of 3 keV, comparable to present day constraints, can be ruled out at more than 2 sigma confidence level with 1000 hours of observations at z > 5.
  • This paper presents a compilation of clustering results taken from the literature for galaxies with highly enhanced (SFR [30-10^3] Msun/yr) star formation activity observed in the redshift range z=[0-3]. We show that, irrespective of the selection technique and only very mildly depending on the star forming rate, the clustering lengths of these objects present a sharp increase of about a factor 3 between z~1 and z~2, going from values of ~5 Mpc to about 15 Mpc and higher. This behaviour is reflected in the trend of the masses of the dark matter hosts of star-forming galaxies which increase from ~10^11.5 Msun to ~10^13.5 Msun between z~1 and z~2. Our analysis shows that galaxies which actively form stars at high redshifts are not the same population of sources we observe in the more local universe. In fact, vigorous star formation in the early universe is hosted by very massive structures, while for z~1 a comparable activity is encountered in much smaller systems, consistent with the down-sizing scenario. The available clustering data can hardly be reconciled with merging as the main trigger for intense star formation activity at high redshifts. We further argue that, after a characteristic time-scale of ~1 Gyr, massive star-forming galaxies at z>~2 evolve into z<~1.5 passive galaxies with large (Mstellar=[10^11 - 10^12] Msun) stellar masses.
  • We have selected a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) from the WMAP 7-yr catalog within the SDSS area, all with measured redshift, and have compared the black hole mass estimates based on fitting a standard accretion disk model to the `blue bump' with those obtained from the commonly used single epoch virial method. The sample comprises 79 objects with a flux density limit of 1 Jy at 23 GHz, 54 of which (68%) have a clearly detected `blue bump'. Thirty-four of the latter have, in the literature, black hole mass estimates obtained with the virial method. The mass estimates obtained from the two methods are well correlated. If the calibration factor of the virial relation is set to $f=4.5$, well within the range of recent estimates, the mean logarithmic ratio of the two mass estimates is equal to zero with a dispersion close to the estimated uncertainty of the virial method. The fact that the two independent methods agree so closely in spite of the potentially large uncertainties associated with each lends strong support to both of them. The distribution of black-hole masses for the 54 FSRQs in our sample with a well detected blue bump has a median value of $7.4\times 10^{8}\,M_\odot$. It declines at the low mass end, consistent with other indications that radio loud AGNs are generally associated with the most massive black holes, although the decline may be, at least partly, due to the source selection. The distribution drops above $\log(M_\bullet/M_\odot) = 9.4$, implying that ultra-massive black holes associated with FSRQs must be rare.
  • We build a sample of 298 spectroscopically-confirmed galaxies at redshift z~2, selected in the z-band from the GOODS-MUSIC catalog. By exploiting the rest frame 8 um luminosity as a proxy of the star formation rate (SFR) we check the accuracy of the standard SED-fitting technique, finding it is not accurate enough to provide reliable estimates of the galaxy physical parameters. We then develop a new SED-fitting method that includes the IR luminosity as a prior and a generalized Calzetti law with a variable RV . Then we exploit such a new method to re-analyze our galaxy sample, and to robustly determine SFRs, stellar masses and ages. We find that there is a general trend of increasing attenuation with the SFR. Moreover, we find that the SFRs range between a few to 1000 solar mass per year, the masses from one billion to 400 billion solar masses, while the ages from a few tens of Myr to more than 1 Gyr. We discuss how individual age easurements of highly attenuated objects indicate that dust must form within a few tens of Myr and be copious already at ~100 Myr. In addition, we find that low luminous galaxies harbor, on average, significantly older stellar populations and are also less massive than brighter ones; we discuss how these findings and the well known 'downsizing' scenario are consistent in a framework where less massive galaxies form first, but their star formation lasts longer. Finally, we find that the near-IR attenuation is not scarce for luminous objects, contrary to what is customarily assumed; we discuss how this affects the interpretation of the observed mass-to-light ratios.
  • The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalog (ERCSC) has offered the first opportunity to accurately determine the luminosity function of dusty galaxies in the very local Universe (i.e. distances <~ 100 Mpc), at several (sub-)millimetre wavelengths, using blindly selected samples of low redshift sources, unaffected by cosmological evolution. This project, however, requires careful consideration of a variety of issues including the choice of the appropriate flux density measurement, the separation of dusty galaxies from radio sources and from Galactic sources, the correction for the CO emission, the effect of density inhomogeneities, and more. We present estimates of the local luminosity functions at 857 GHz (350 microns), 545 GHz (550 microns) and 353 GHz (850 microns) extending across the characteristic luminosity L_star, and a preliminary estimate over a limited luminosity range at 217 GHz (1382 microns). At 850 microns and for luminosities L >~ L_star our results agree with previous estimates, derived from the SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey (SLUGS), but are higher than the latter at L <~ L_star. We also find good agreement with estimates at 350 and 500 microns based on preliminary Herschel survey data.
  • The Supermodel provides an accurate description of the thermal contribution by the hot intracluster plasma which is crucial for the analysis of the hard excess. In this paper the thermal emissivity in the Coma cluster is derived starting from the intracluster gas temperature and density profiles obtained by the Supermodel analysis of X-ray observables: the XMM-Newton temperature profile and the Rosat brightness distribution. The Supermodel analysis of the BeppoSAX/PDS hard X-ray spectrum confirms our previous results, namely an excess at the c.l. of ~4.8sigma and a nonthermal flux of 1.30+-0.40x 10^-11 erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the energy range 20-80 keV. A recent joint XMM-Newton/Suzaku analysis reports an upper limit of ~6x10^-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the energy range 20-80 keV for the nonthermal flux with an average gas temperature of 8.45+-0.06 keV, and an excess of nonthermal radiation at a confidence level above 4sigma, without including systematic effects, for an average XMM-Newton temperature of 8.2 keV in the Suzaku/HXD-PIN FOV, in agreement with our earlier PDS analysis. Here we present a further evidence of the compatibility between the Suzaku and BeppoSAX spectra, obtained by our Supermodel analysis of the PDS data, when the smaller size of the HXD-PIN FOV and the two different average temperatures derived by XMM-Newton and by the joint XMM-Newton/Suzaku analysis are taken into account. The consistency of the PDS and HXD-PIN spectra reaffirms the presence of a nonthermal component in the hard X-ray spectrum of the Coma cluster. The Supermodel analysis of the PDS data reports an excess at c.l. above 4sigma also for the higher average temperature of 8.45 keV thanks to the PDS FOV considerably greater than the HXD-PIN FOV.
  • The Seminar "Dark Matter in Galaxies" was delivered, within the Dark Matter Awareness Week (1-8 December 2010) at 140 institutes in 46 countries and it was followed by 4200 people. A documentation of this worldwide initiative is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOBit8a-1Fw. A reference presentation, prepared by a coordinated pool of leading scientists in the field, was available to speakers. In response to feedbacks and suggestions, we upgraded it to a "Presentation Review" of which we provide here the Explanatory Notes, the link to the .pptx file, and some image of the slides. This Presentation Review is an innovative scientific product to meet the request of information about the phenomenology of the DM mystery at galactic scale. This Review concerns the mass discrepancy phenomenon detected in galaxies, usually accounted by postulating the presence of a non luminous non baryonic component. In the theoretical framework of Newtonian Gravity we recall the properties of Dark Matter halos as emerging from the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations performed in the current $\Lambda CDM$ scenario. Then, the simple but much-telling phenomenology of the distribution of dark and luminous matter in Spirals, Ellipticals, and dwarf Spheroidals is reported. We show that a coherent observational framework emerges from reliable data of different large samples of objects and it is obtained by different methods of investigation. We then highlight the impressive evidence that the distribution of dark and luminous matter are closely correlated and that have universal features. Hints on the cosmological role of this phenomenological scenario are then given. Finally, we discuss the constraints on the elusive nature of the dark particle that the actual distribution of DM around galaxies pose on its direct and indirect searches.
  • We propose that angular momentum transfer from the baryons to the Dark Matter (DM) during the early stages of galaxy formation can flatten the halo inner density profile and modify the halo dynamics. We compute the phase-space distribution function of DM halos, that corresponds to the density and anisotropy profiles obtained from N-body simulations in the concordance cosmology. We then describe an injection of angular momentum into the halo by modifying the distribution function, and show that the system evolves into a new equilibrium configuration; the latter features a constant central density and a tangentially-dominated anisotropy profile in the inner regions, while the structure is nearly unchanged beyond 10% of the virial radius. Then we propose a toy model to account for such a halo evolution, based on the angular momentum exchange due to dynamical friction; at the epoch of galaxy formation this is efficiently exerted by the DM onto the gas clouds spiralling down the potential well. The comparison between the angular momentum profile gained by the halo through dynamical friction and that provided by the perturbed distribution function reveals a surprising similarity, hinting at the reliability of the process.