• After having demonstrated that an IFU, attached to a microscope rather than to a telescope, is capable of differentiating complex organic tissue with spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, we have launched a clinical validation program that utilizes a novel optimized fiber-coupled multi-channel spectrograph whose layout is based on the modular MUSE spectrograph concept. The new design features a telecentric input and has an extended blue performance, but otherwise maintains the properties of high throughput and excellent image quality over an octave of wavelength coverage with modest spectral resolution. We present the opto-mechanical layout and details of its optical performance.
  • Since 2014, MUSE, the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer, is in operation at the ESO-VLT. It combines a superb spatial sampling with a large wavelength coverage. By design, MUSE is an integral-field instrument, but its field-of-view and large multiplex make it a powerful tool for multi-object spectroscopy too. Every data-cube consists of 90,000 image-sliced spectra and 3700 monochromatic images. In autumn 2014, the observing programs with MUSE have commenced, with targets ranging from distant galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field to local stellar populations, star formation regions and globular clusters. This paper provides a brief summary of the key features of the MUSE instrument and its complex data reduction software. Some selected examples are given, how multi-object spectroscopy for hundreds of continuum and emission-line objects can be obtained in wide, deep and crowded fields with MUSE, without the classical need for any target pre-selection.
  • The instrumentation plan for the European-Extremely Large Telescope foresees a Multi-Object Spectrograph (E-ELT MOS). The MOSAIC project is proposed by a European-Brazilian consortium, to provide a unique MOS facility for astrophysics, studies of the inter-galactic medium and for cosmology. The science cases range from spectroscopy of the most distant galaxies, mass assembly and evolution of galaxies, via resolved stellar populations and galactic archaeology, to planet formation studies. A further strong driver are spectroscopic follow-up observations of targets that will be discovered with the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We report on extensive testing carried out on the optical fibers for the VIRUS instrument. The primary result of this work explores how 10+ years of simulated wear on a VIRUS fiber bundle affects both transmission and focal ratio degradation (FRD) of the optical fibers. During the accelerated lifetime tests we continuously monitored the fibers for signs of FRD. We find that transient FRD events were common during the portions of the tests when motion was at telescope slew rates, but dropped to negligible levels during rates of motion typical for science observation. Tests of fiber transmission and FRD conducted both before and after the lifetime tests reveal that while transmission values do not change over the 10+ years of simulated wear, a clear increase in FRD is seen in all 18 fibers tested. This increase in FRD is likely due to microfractures that develop over time from repeated flexure of the fiber bundle, and stands in contrast to the transient FRD events that stem from localized stress and subsequent modal diffusion of light within the fibers. There was no measurable wavelength dependence on the increase in FRD over 350 nm to 600 nm. We also report on bend radius tests conducted on individual fibers and find the 266 microns VIRUS fibers to be immune to bending-induced FRD at bend radii of R > 10cm. Below this bend radius FRD increases slightly with decreasing radius. Lastly, we give details of a degradation seen in the fiber bundle currently deployed on the Mitchell Spectrograph (formally VIRUS-P) at McDonald Observatory. The degradation is shown to be caused by a localized shear in a select number of optical fibers that leads to an explosive form of FRD. In a few fibers, the overall transmission loss through the instrument can exceed 80%.
  • The 4MOST consortium is currently halfway through a Conceptual Design study for ESO with the aim to develop a wide-field (>3 square degree, goal >5 square degree), high-multiplex (>1500 fibres, goal 3000 fibres) spectroscopic survey facility for an ESO 4m-class telescope (VISTA). 4MOST will run permanently on the telescope to perform a 5 year public survey yielding more than 20 million spectra at resolution R~5000 ({\lambda}=390-1000 nm) and more than 2 million spectra at R~20,000 (395-456.5 nm & 587-673 nm). The 4MOST design is especially intended to complement three key all-sky, space-based observatories of prime European interest: Gaia, eROSITA and Euclid. Initial design and performance estimates for the wide-field corrector concepts are presented. We consider two fibre positioner concepts, a well-known Phi-Theta system and a new R-Theta concept with a large patrol area. The spectrographs are fixed configuration two-arm spectrographs, with dedicated spectrographs for the high- and low-resolution. A full facility simulator is being developed to guide trade-off decisions regarding the optimal field-of-view, number of fibres needed, and the relative fraction of high-to-low resolution fibres. Mock catalogues with template spectra from seven Design Reference Surveys are simulated to verify the science requirements of 4MOST. The 4MOST consortium aims to deliver the full 4MOST facility by the end of 2018 and start delivering high-level data products for both consortium and ESO community targets a year later with yearly increments.
  • We present a catalog of emission-line galaxies selected solely by their emission-line fluxes using a wide-field integral field spectrograph. This work is partially motivated as a pilot survey for the upcoming Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). We describe the observations, reductions, detections, redshift classifications, line fluxes, and counterpart information for 397 emission-line galaxies detected over 169 sq.arcmin with a 3500-5800 Ang. bandpass under 5 Ang. full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) spectral resolution. The survey's best sensitivity for unresolved objects under photometric conditions is between 4-20 E-17 erg/s/sq.cm depending on the wavelength, and Ly-alpha luminosities between 3-6 E42 erg/s are detectable. This survey method complements narrowband and color-selection techniques in the search for high redshift galaxies with its different selection properties and large volume probed. The four survey fields within the COSMOS, GOODS-N, MUNICS, and XMM-LSS areas are rich with existing, complementary data. We find 104 galaxies via their high redshift Ly-alpha emission at 1.9<z<3.8, and the majority of the remainder objects are low redshift [OII]3727 emitters at z<0.56. The classification between low and high redshift objects depends on rest frame equivalent width, as well as other indicators, where available. Based on matches to X-ray catalogs, the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fraction amongst the Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) is 6%. We also analyze the survey's completeness and contamination properties through simulations. We find five high-z, highly-significant, resolved objects with full-width-half-maximum sizes >44 sq.arcsec which appear to be extended Ly-alpha nebulae. We also find three high-z objects with rest frame Ly-alpha equivalent widths above the level believed to be achievable with normal star formation, EW(rest)>240 Ang.
  • Due to its location and climate, Antarctica offers unique conditions for long-period observations across a broad wavelength regime, where important diagnostic lines for molecules and ions can be found, that are essential to understand the chemical properties of the interstellar medium. In addition to the natural benefits of the site, new technologies, resulting from astrophotonics, may allow miniaturised instruments, that are easier to winterise and advanced filters to further reduce the background in the infrared.
  • Antarctica offers unique conditions for ground-based observations, such as low sky background in the infrared, improved seeing, and low turbulence and scintillation noise. These properties are particularly beneficial to imaging, precision photometry, and infrared observations. It may be less clear if Antarctica offers equally compelling advantages for spectroscopy, in particular in the optical domain. However, scientific programmes that make use of imaging (or 3D) spectroscopy for selected follow-up studies of IR surveys, long-term monitoring of extended targets and resolved stellar population studies in crowded fields, also benefit from the site conditions at Dome C.
  • In addition to study extragalactic stellar populations in their integrated light, the detailed analysis of individual resolved objects has become feasible, mainly for luminous giant stars and for extragalactic planetary nebulae (XPNe) in nearby galaxies. A recently started project at the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP), called ``XPN--Physics'', aims to verify if XPNe are useful probes to measure the chemical abundances of their parent stellar population. The project involves theoretical and observational work packages.
  • VIRUS is a planned integral-field instrument for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). In order to achieve a large field-of-view and high grasp at reasonable costs, the approach is to replicate integral-field units (IFU) and medium sized spectrographs many times. The Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) contributes to VIRUS with the development and testing of the IFU prototype. This paper describes the optomechanical design and the manufacture of the fiber-based IFU subsystem. The initial VIRUS development aims to produce a prototype and to measure its performance. Additionally, techniques will be investigated to allow industrial replication of the highly specific fiber-bundle layout. This will be necessary if this technique is to be applied to the next generation of even larger astronomical instrumentation.
  • PPak is a new fiber-based Integral Field Unit (IFU), developed at the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, implemented as a module into the existing PMAS spectrograph. The purpose of PPak is to provide both an extended field-of-view with a large light collecting power for each spatial element, as well as an adequate spectral resolution. The PPak system consists of a fiber bundle with 331 object, 36 sky and 15 calibration fibers. The object and sky fibers collect the light from the focal plane behind a focal reducer lens. The object fibers of PPak, each 2.7 arcseconds in diameter, provide a contiguous hexagonal field-of-view of 74 times 64 arcseconds on the sky, with a filling factor of 60%. The operational wavelength range is from 400 to 900nm. The PPak-IFU, together with the PMAS spectrograph, are intended for the study of extended, low surface brightness objects, offering an optimization of total light-collecting power and spectral resolution. This paper describes the instrument design, the assembly, integration and tests, the commissioning and operational procedures, and presents the measured performance at the telescope.
  • We present our Disk Mass project as the main science case for building a new fiber IFU-module for the PMAS spectrograph, currently mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the 3.5m telescope on Calar Alto. Compared to traditional long-slit observations, the large light collecting power of 2-dimensional Integral Field Units dramatically improves the prospects for performing spectroscopy on extended low surface brightness objects with high spectral resolution. This enables us to measure stellar velocity dispersions in the outer disk of normal spiral galaxies. We describe some results from a PMAS pilot study using the existing lenslet array, and provide a basic description of the new fiber IFU-module for PMAS.