• We investigate the emergence of ${\cal N}=1$ supersymmetry in the long-range behavior of three-dimensional parity-symmetric Yukawa systems. We discuss a renormalization approach that manifestly preserves supersymmetry whenever such symmetry is realized, and use it to prove that supersymmetry-breaking operators are irrelevant, thus proving that such operators are suppressed in the infrared. All our findings are illustrated with the aid of the $\epsilon$-expansion and a functional variant of perturbation theory, but we provide numerical estimates of critical exponents that are based on the non-perturbative functional renormalization group.
  • Supersymmetric gauge theories are an important building block for extensions of the standard model. As a first step towards Super-QCD we investigate the pure gauge sector with gluons and gluinos on the lattice, in particular the low energy mass spectrum: meson-like gluinoballs, gluino-glueballs and pure glueballs. We report on some first calculations performed with clover improved Wilson fermions on rather small lattices. The supersymmetric continuum limit and particle masses are discussed and compared to predictions from effective field theory.
  • Using covariant methods, we construct and explore the Wetterich equation for a non-minimal coupling $F(\phi)R$ of a quantized scalar field to the Ricci scalar of a prescribed curved space. This includes the often considered non-minimal coupling $\xi \phi^2 R$ as a special case. We consider the truncations without and with scale- and field-dependent wave function renormalization in dimensions between four and two. Thereby the main emphasis is on analytic and numerical solutions of the fixed point equations and the behavior in the vicinity of the corresponding fixed points. We determine the non-minimal coupling in the symmetric and spontaneously broken phases with vanishing and non-vanishing average fields, respectively. Using functional perturbative renormalization group methods, we discuss the leading universal contributions to the RG flow below the upper critical dimension $d=4$.
  • Supersymmetry is one of the possible scenarios for physics beyond the standard model. The building blocks of this scenario are supersymmetric gauge theories. In our work we study the $\mathcal{N}=1$ Super-Yang-Mills (SYM) theory with gauge group SU(2) dimensionally reduced to two-dimensional $\mathcal{N}=2$ SYM theory. In our lattice formulation we break supersymmetry and chiral symmetry explicitly while preserving R symmetry. By fine tuning the bar-mass of the fermions in the Lagrangian we construct a supersymmetric continuum theory. To this aim we carefully investigate mass spectra and Ward identities, which both show a clear signal of supersymmetry restoration in the continuum limit.
  • The Thirring model is a four-fermion theory with a current-current interaction and $U(2N)$ chiral symmetry. It is closely related to three-dimensional QED and other models used to describe properties of graphene. In addition it serves as a toy model to study chiral symmetry breaking. In the limit of flavour number $N \to 1/2$ it is equivalent to the Gross-Neveu model, which shows a parity-breaking discrete phase transition. The model was already studied with different methods, including Dyson-Schwinger equations, functional renormalisation group methods and lattice simulations. Most studies agree that there is a phase transition from a symmetric phase to a spontaneously broken phase for a small number of fermion flavours, but no symmetry breaking for large $N$. But there is no consensus on the critical flavour number $N^\text{cr}$ above which there is no phase transition anymore and on further details of the critical behaviour. Values of $N$ found in the literature vary between $2$ and $7$. All earlier lattice studies were performed with staggered fermions. Thus it is questionable if in the continuum limit the lattice model recovers the internal symmetries of the continuum model. We present new results from lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the Thirring model with SLAC fermions which exactly implement all internal symmetries of the continuum model even at finite lattice spacing. If we reformulate the model in an irreducible representation of the Clifford algebra, we find, in contradiction to earlier results, that the behaviour for even and odd flavour numbers is very different: For even flavour numbers, chiral and parity symmetry are always unbroken. For odd flavour numbers parity symmetry is spontaneously broken below the critical flavour number $N_\text{ir}^\text{cr}=9$ while chiral symmetry is still unbroken.
  • Albeit the standard model is the most successful model of particles physics, it still has some theoretical shortcomings, for instance the hierarchy problem, the absence of dark matter, etc. Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model could be a possible solution to these problems. One of the building blocks of these supersymmetric models are supersymmetric gauge theories. It is expected that they exhibit interesting features like confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, magnetic monopoles and the like. We present new results on N=2 Super Yang Mills theory in two dimensions. The lattice action is derived by a dimensional reduction of the N=1 Super Yang Mills theory in four dimensions. By preserving the R symmetry of the four dimensional model we can exploit Ward identities to fine tune our parameters of the model to obtain the chiral and supersymmetric continuum limit. This allows us to calculate the mass spectrum at the physical point and compare these results with effective field theories.
  • We investigate a class of four-fermion theories which includes well-known models like the Gross-Neveu model and the Thirring model. In three spacetime dimensions, they are used to model interesting solid state systems like high temperature superconductors and graphene. Additionally, they serve as toy models to study chiral symmetry breaking (CSB). For any number of fermion flavours the Gross-Neveu model has a broken and a symmetric phase, while the existence of a broken phase in the Thirring model depends on the number of flavours. The critical number of fermion flavours beyond which there exists no CSB is still subject of ongoing discussions. Using SLAC fermions we simulate the Thirring model with exact chiral symmetry. To obtain a chiral condensate one can introduce a symmetry-breaking mass term and carefully study the limits of infinite lattice and zero-mass. So far, we did not see CSB within this approach for the Thirring model with 2 or more (reducible) flavours. The talk presents alternative approaches to investigate these findings. We employ certain Fierz identities to map the Thirring model into equivalent four-fermion models, for which the chiral condensate does not seem to vanish. In the new formulations based on reshuffled degrees of freedom we find a sign problem (which is not present in the original formulation). For this reason we developed an algorithm similar to fermion bags, which may solve this problem. As a further approach, we embed the multi-flavour Thirring model in a larger class of four-fermion theories to study the chiral symmetry and its breaking in a wider context.
  • The Thirring model is a four fermion theory with vector interaction. We study it in three dimensions, where it is closely related to QED and other models used to describe properties of graphene. In addition it is a good toy model to study chiral symmetry breaking, since a phase with broken chiral symmetry is present for the model with one fermion flavour. On the other hand, there is no such phase in the limit of infinitely many fermion flavours. Thus, a transition at some critical flavour number Nfc is expected, where the broken phase vanishes. The model was already studied with different methods, including Schwinger-Dyson, functional renormalization group and lattice approaches. Most studies agree that there is indeed a phase transition from a chirally symmetric phase to a spontaneously broken phase for a small number of fermion flavours. But there is no agreement on the critical flavour number and further details of the critical behaviour. Values of Nfc found in the literature usually range between 2 and 7. All earlier lattice studies were performed with staggered fermions, where it is questionable if the continuum limit of the lattice model has the same chiral symmetry as the continuum model. We present an approach for simulations of the Thirring model with SLAC fermions. With this choice, we can be sure to implement the full chiral symmetry of the continuum model. First results from simulations are shown but do not allow a reliable estimate of Nfc so far.
  • We study the renormalization group flow of $\mathbb{Z}_2$-invariant supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric scalar models in the local potential approximation using functional renormalization group methods. We focus our attention to the fixed points of the renormalization group flow of these models, which emerge as scaling solutions. In two dimensions these solutions are interpreted as the minimal (supersymmetric) models of conformal field theory, while in three dimension they are manifestations of the Wilson-Fisher universality class and its supersymmetric counterpart. We also study the analytically continued flow in fractal dimensions between 2 and 4 and determine the critical dimensions for which irrelevant operators become relevant and change the universality class of the scaling solution. We also include novel analytic and numerical investigations of the properties that determine the occurrence of the scaling solutions within the method. For each solution we offer new techniques to compute the spectrum of the deformations and obtain the corresponding critical exponents.
  • The running of the non-minimal parameter (\xi) of the interaction of the real scalar field and scalar curvature is explored within the non-perturbative setting of the functional renormalization group (RG). We establish the RG flow in curved space-time in the scalar field sector, in particular derive an equation for the non-minimal parameter. The RG trajectory is numerically explored for different sets of initial data.
  • We confirm the convergence of the derivative expansion in two supersymmetric models via the functional renormalization group method. Using pseudo-spectral methods, high-accuracy results for the lowest energies in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and a detailed description of the supersymmetric analogue of the Wilson-Fisher fixed point of the three-dimensional Wess-Zumino model are obtained. The superscaling relation proposed earlier, relating the relevant critical exponent to the anomalous dimension, is shown to be valid to all orders in the supercovariant derivative expansion and for all $d \ge 2$.
  • We study the non-perturbative renormalization group flow of the nonlinear O(N) sigma model in two and three spacetime dimensions using a scheme that combines an effective local Hybrid Monte Carlo update routine, blockspin transformations and a Monte Carlo demon method. In two dimensions our results verify perturbative renormalizability. In three dimensions, we determine the flow diagram of the theory for various $N$ and different truncations and find a non-trivial fixed point, which indicates non-perturbative renormalizability. It is related to the well-studied phase transition of the O(N) universality class and characterizes the continuum physics of the model. We compare the obtained renormalization group flows with recent investigations by means of the Functional Renormalization Group.
  • We show that a non-relativistic particle in a combined field of a magnetic monopole and 1/r^2 potential reveals a hidden, partially free dynamics when the strength of the central potential and the charge-monopole coupling constant are mutually fitted to each other. In this case the system admits both a conserved Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector and a dynamical conformal symmetry. The supersymmetrically extended system corresponds then to a background of a self-dual or anti-self-dual dyon. It is described by a quadratically extended Lie superalgebra D(2,1;alpha) with alpha=1/2, in which the bosonic set of generators is enlarged by a generalized Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector and its dynamical integral counterpart related to Galilei symmetry, as well as by the chiral Z_2-grading operator. The odd part of the nonlinear superalgebra comprises a complete set of 24=2 x 3 x 4 fermionic generators. Here a usual duplication comes from the Z_2-grading structure, the second factor can be associated with a triad of scalar integrals --- the Hamiltonian, the generator of special conformal transformations and the squared total angular momentum vector, while the quadruplication is generated by a chiral spin vector integral which exits due to the (anti)-self-dual nature of the electromagnetic background.
  • The QCD phase diagram at densities relevant to neutron stars remains elusive, mainly due to the fermion-sign problem. At the same time, a plethora of possible phases has been predicted in models. Meanwhile $G_2$-QCD, for which the $SU(3)$ gauge group of QCD is replaced by the exceptional Lie group $G_2$, does not have a sign problem and can be simulated at such densities using standard lattice techniques. It thus provides benchmarks to models and functional continuum methods, and it serves to unravel the nature of possible phases of strongly interacting matter at high densities. Instrumental in understanding these phases is that $G_2$-QCD has fermionic baryons, and that it can therefore sustain a baryonic Fermi surface. Because the baryon spectrum of $G_2$-QCD also contains bosonic diquark and probably other more exotic states, it is important to understand this spectrum before one can disentangle the corresponding contributions to the baryon density. Here we present the first systematic study of this spectrum from lattice simulations at different quark masses. This allows us to relate the mass hierarchy, ranging from scalar would-be-Goldstone bosons and intermediate vector bosons to the $G_2$-nucleons and deltas, to individual structures observed in the total baryon density at finite chemical potential.
  • Due to the fermion sign problem, standard lattice Monte-Carlo method for QCD fail at small temperatures and high baryon densities. $G_2$-QCD, QCD with the gauge group $SU(3)$ replaced by the exceptional Lie group $G_2$, can be simulated using lattice techniques at these densities, and can therefore provide an illustration of the possible phase structure. Here we present a systematic investigation of the ground-state hadronic spectrum using lattice simulations for different quark masses in several hadronic sectors. We then show that the different hadronic scales of Goldstone bosons, intermediate bosons, and baryons is reflected in the phase structure at finite density.
  • A study of the renormalization group flow in the three-dimensional nonlinear O(N) sigma model using Monte Carlo Renormalization Group (MCRG) techniques is presented. To achieve this, we combine an improved blockspin transformation with the canonical demon method to determine the flow diagram for a number of different truncations. Systematic errors of the approach are highlighted. Results are discussed with hindsight on the fixed point structure of the model and the corresponding critical exponents. Special emphasis is drawn on the existence of a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point as required for theories modeling the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity.
  • Supersymmetry is a prominent candidate for physics beyond the standard model. In order to compute the spectrum of supersymmetric theories, we employ nonperturbative lattice QFT techniques which due to the discretisation of spacetime violate supersymmetry at finite lattice spacings. Care has to be taken then to restore supersymmetry in the continuum limit. We discuss a discretisation of the supersymmetric Nonlinear O(N) Sigma model in two dimensions and argue that supersymmetry may be restored by finetuning of a single parameter. Furthermore, we show preliminary results for the vacuum physics of N = 2 Super-Yang-Mills theory in three dimensions.
  • A supersymmetric extension of the nonlinear O(3) sigma model in two spacetime dimensions is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We argue that it is impossible to construct a lattice action that implements both the O(3) symmetry as well as at least one supersymmetry exactly at finite lattice spacing. It is shown by explicit calculations that previously proposed discretizations fail to reproduce the exact symmetries of the target manifold in the continuum limit. We provide an alternative lattice action with exact O(3) symmetry and compare two approaches based on different derivative operators. Using the nonlocal SLAC derivative for the quenched model on moderately sized lattices we extract the value {\sigma}(2, u_0) = 1.2604(13) for the step scaling function at u_0 = 1.0595, to be compared with the exact value 1.261210. For the supersymmetric model with SLAC derivative the discrete chiral symmetry is maintained but we encounter strong sign fluctuations, rendering large lattice simulations ineffective. By applying the Wilson prescription, supersymmetry and chiral symmetry are broken explicitly at finite lattice spacing, though there is clear evidence that both are restored in the continuum limit by fine tuning of a single mass parameter.
  • We study the renormalization group flow of the O(N) non-linear sigma model in arbitrary dimensions. The effective action of the model is truncated to fourth order in the derivative expansion and the flow is obtained by combining the non-perturbative renormalization group and the background field method. We investigate the flow in three dimensions and analyze the phase structure for arbitrary N. The corresponding results about the critical properties of the models will serve as a reference for upcoming simulations with the Monte-Carlo renormalization group.
  • The fermion-sign problem at finite density is a persisting challenge for Monte-Carlo simulations. Theories that do not have a sign problem can provide valuable guidance and insight for physically more relevant ones that do. Replacing the gauge group SU(3) of QCD by the exceptional group G2, for example, leads to such a theory. It has mesons as well as bosonic and fermionic baryons, and shares many features with QCD. This makes the G2 gauge theory ideally suited to study general properties of dense, strongly-interacting matter, including baryonic and nuclear Fermi pressure effects. Here we present the first-ever results from lattice simulations of G2 QCD with dynamical fermions, providing a first explorative look at the phase diagram of this QCD-like theory at finite temperature and baryon chemical potential.
  • We perform a global renormalization group study of O(N) symmetric Wess-Zumino theories and their phases in three euclidean dimensions. At infinite N the theory is solved exactly. The phases and phase transitions are worked out for finite and infinite short-distance cutoffs. A distinctive new feature arises at strong coupling, where the effective superfield potential becomes multi-valued, signalled by divergences in the fermion-boson interaction. Our findings resolve the long-standing puzzle about the occurrence of degenerate O(N) symmetric phases. At finite N, we find a strongly-coupled fixed point in the local potential approximation and explain its impact on the phase transition. We also examine the possibility for a supersymmetric Bardeen-Moshe-Bander phenomenon, and relate our findings with the spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry in other models.
  • Transitions between centre sectors are related to confinement in pure Yang-Mills theories. We study the impact of these transitions in QCD-like theories for which centre symmetry is explicitly broken by the presence of matter. For low temperatures, we provide numerical evidence that centre transitions do occur with matter merely providing a bias towards the trivial centre sector until centre symmetry is spontaneously broken at high temperatures. The phenomenological consequences of these transitions for dense hadron matter are illustrated in an SU(3) effective quark theory: centre dressed quarks undergo condensation due to Bose-type statistics forming a hitherto unknown state of dense but cold quark matter.
  • While pure Yang-Mills theory feature the centre symmetry, this symmetry is explicitly broken by the presence of dynamical matter. We study the impact of the centre symmetry in such QCD-like theories. In the analytically solvable Schwinger model, centre transitions take place even under extreme conditions, temperature and/or density, and we show that they are key to the solution of the Silver-Blaze problem. We then develop an effective SU(3) quark model which confines quarks by virtue of centre sector transitions. The phase diagram by confinement is obtained as a function of the temperature and the chemical potential. We show that at low temperatures and intermediate values for the chemical potential the centre dressed quarks undergo condensation due to Bose like statistics. This is the Fermi Einstein condensation. To corroborate the existence of centre sector transitions in gauge theories with matter, we study (at vanishing chemical potential) the interface tension in the three-dimensional Z2 gauge theory with Ising matter, the distribution of the Polyakov line in the four-dimensional SU(2)-Higgs model and devise a new type of order parameter which is designed to detect centre sector transitions. Our analytical and numerical findings lead us to conjecture a new state of cold, but dense matter in the hadronic phase for which Fermi Einstein condensation is realised.
  • We analyse supersymmetric models that show supersymmetry breaking in one and two dimensions using lattice methods. Starting from supersymmetric quantum mechanics we explain the fundamental principles and problems that arise in putting supersymmetric models onto the lattice. We compare our lattice results (built upon the non-local SLAC derivative) with numerically exact results obtained within the Hamiltonian approach. A particular emphasis is put on the discussion of boundary conditions. We investigate the ground state structure, mass spectrum, effective potential and Ward identities and conclude that lattice methods are suitable to derive the physical properties of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, even with broken supersymmetry. Based on this result we analyse the two dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model with spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. First we show that (in agreement with earlier analytical and numerical studies) the SLAC derivative is a sensible choice in the quenched model, which is nothing but the two dimensional phi^4 model. Then, we present the very first computation of a renormalised critical coupling for the complete supersymmetric model. This calculation makes use of Binder cumulants and is supported by a direct comparison to Ward identity results, both in the continuum and infinite volume limit. The physical picture is completed by masses at two selected couplings, one in the supersymmetric phase and one in the supersymmetry broken phase. Signatures of the Goldstino in the fermionic correlator are clearly visible in the broken case.
  • We derive a supersymmetric renormalization group (RG) equation for the scale-dependent superpotential of the supersymmetric O(N) model in three dimensions. For a supersymmetric optimized regulator function we solve the RG equation for the superpotential exactly in the large-N limit. The fixed-point solutions are classified by an exactly marginal coupling. In the weakly coupled regime there exists a unique fixed point solution, for intermediate couplings we find two separate fixed point solutions and in the strong coupling regime no globally defined fixed-point potentials exist. We determine the exact critical exponents both for the superpotential and the associated scalar potential. Finally we relate the high-temperature limit of the four-dimensional theory to the Wilson-Fisher fixed point of the purely scalar theory.