• The 21-cm power spectrum (PS) has been shown to be a powerful discriminant of reionization and cosmic dawn astrophysical parameters. However, the 21-cm tomographic signal is highly non-Gaussian. Therefore there is additional information which is wasted if only the PS is used for parameter recovery. Here we showcase astrophysical parameter recovery directly from 21-cm images, using deep learning with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Using a database of 2D images taken from 10,000 21-cm lightcones (each generated from different cosmological initial conditions), we show that a CNN is able to recover parameters describing the first galaxies: (i) Tvir , their minimum host halo virial temperatures (or masses) capable of hosting efficient star formation; (ii) {\zeta} , their typical ionizing efficiencies; (iii) LX/SFR , their typical soft-band X-ray luminosity to star formation rate; and (iv) E0 , the minimum X-ray energy capable of escaping the galaxy into the IGM. For most of their allowed ranges, log Tvir and log LX/SFR are recovered with < 1% uncertainty, while {\zeta} and E0 are recovered within 10% uncertainty. Our results are roughly comparable to the accuracy obtained from Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling of the PS with 21CMMC for the two mock observations analyzed previously, although we caution that we do not yet include noise and foreground contaminants in this proof-of-concept study.
  • Recent detections of Lyman alpha (Ly$\alpha$) emission from $z>7.5$ galaxies were somewhat unexpected given a dearth of previous non-detections in this era when the intergalactic medium (IGM) is still highly neutral. But these detections were from UV bright galaxies, which preferentially live in overdensities which reionize early, and have significantly Doppler-shifted Ly$\alpha$ line profiles emerging from their interstellar media (ISM), making them less affected by the global IGM state. Using a combination of reionization simulations and empirical ISM models we show, as a result of these two effects, UV bright galaxies in overdensities have $>2\times$ higher transmission through the $z\sim7$ IGM than typical field galaxies, and this boosted transmission is enhanced as the neutral fraction increases. The boosted transmission is not sufficient to explain the observed high Ly$\alpha$ fraction of $M_\mathrm{UV} \lesssim -22$ galaxies (Stark et al. 2017), suggesting Ly$\alpha$ emitted by these galaxies must be stronger than expected due to enhanced production and/or selection effects. Despite the bias of UV bright galaxies to reside in overdensities we show Ly$\alpha$ observations of such galaxies can accurately measure the global neutral hydrogen fraction, particularly when Ly$\alpha$ from UV faint galaxies is extinguished, making them ideal candidates for spectroscopic follow-up into the cosmic Dark Ages.
  • The cosmic 21 cm signal is set to revolutionise our understanding of the early Universe, allowing us to probe the 3D temperature and ionisation structure of the intergalactic medium (IGM). It will open a window onto the unseen first galaxies, showing us how their UV and X-ray photons drove the cosmic milestones of the epoch of reionisation (EoR) and epoch of heating (EoH). To facilitate parameter inference from the 21 cm signal, we previously developed 21CMMC: a Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampler of 3D EoR simulations. Here we extend 21CMMC to include simultaneous modelling of the EoH, resulting in a complete Bayesian inference framework for the astrophysics dominating the observable epochs of the cosmic 21 cm signal. We demonstrate that second generation interferometers, the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionisation Array (HERA) and Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be able to constrain ionising and X-ray source properties of the first galaxies with a fractional precision of order $\sim1$-10 per cent (1$\sigma$). The ionisation history of the Universe can be constrained to within a few percent. Using our extended framework, we quantify the bias in EoR parameter recovery incurred by the common simplification of a saturated spin temperature in the IGM. Depending on the extent of overlap between the EoR and EoH, the recovered astrophysical parameters can be biased by $\sim3-10\sigma$.
  • We quantify the presence of Ly\alpha\ damping wing absorption from a partially-neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) in the spectrum of the $z=7.08$ QSO, ULASJ1120+0641. Using a Bayesian framework, we simultaneously account for uncertainties in: (i) the intrinsic QSO emission spectrum; and (ii) the distribution of cosmic HI patches during the epoch of reionisation (EoR). For (i) we use a new intrinsic Ly\alpha\ emission line reconstruction method (Greig et al.), sampling a covariance matrix of emission line properties built from a large database of moderate-$z$ QSOs. For (ii), we use the Evolution of 21-cm Structure (EOS; Mesinger et al.) simulations, which span a range of physically-motivated EoR models. We find strong evidence for the presence of damping wing absorption redward of Ly\alpha\ (where there is no contamination from the Ly\alpha\ forest). Our analysis implies that the EoR is not yet complete by $z=7.1$, with the volume-weighted IGM neutral fraction constrained to $\bar{x}_{\rm H\,{\scriptsize I}} = 0.40\substack{+0.21 -0.19}$ at $1\sigma$ ($\bar{x}_{\rm H\,{\scriptsize I}} = 0.40\substack{+0.41 -0.32}$ at $2\sigma$). This result is insensitive to the EoR morphology. Our detection of significant neutral HI in the IGM at $z=7.1$ is consistent with the latest Planck 2016 measurements of the CMB Thompson scattering optical depth (Planck Collaboration XLVII).
  • Using a Bayesian framework, we quantify what current observations imply about the history of the epoch of reionisation (EoR). We use a popular, three-parameter EoR model, flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of physically-plausible reionisation histories. We study the impact of various EoR observations: (i) the optical depth to the CMB measured by Planck 2016; (ii) the dark fraction in the Lyman $\alpha$ and $\beta$ forests; (iii) the redshift evolution of galactic Ly$\alpha$ emission (so-called "Ly$\alpha$ fraction"); (iv) the clustering of Ly$\alpha$ emitters; (v) the IGM damping wing imprint in the spectrum of QSO ULASJ1120+0641; (vi) and the patchy kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal. Combined, (i) and (ii) already place interesting constraints on the reionisation history, with the epochs corresponding to an average neutral fraction of (75, 50, 25) per cent, constrained at 1$\sigma$ to $z= (9.21\substack{+1.22 -1.15}, 8.14\substack{+1.08 -1.00}, 7.26\substack{+1.13 -0.96})$. Folding-in more model-dependent EoR observations [(iii--vi)], strengthens these constraints by tens of per cent, at the cost of a decrease in the likelihood of the best-fit model, driven mostly by (iii). The tightest constraints come from (v). Unfortunately, no current observational set is sufficient to break degeneracies and constrain the astrophysical EoR parameters. However, model-dependent priors on the EoR parameters themselves can be used to set tight limits by excluding regions of parameter space with strong degeneracies. Motivated by recent observations of $z\sim7$ faint, lensed galaxies, we show how a conservative upper limit on the virial temperature of haloes which host reionising galaxies can constrain the escape fraction of ionising photons to $f_{\rm esc} = 0.14\substack{+0.26 -0.09}$
  • We present a new flexible Bayesian framework for directly inferring the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, z~6-10) from detections and non-detections of Lyman Alpha (Ly$\alpha$) emission from Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). Our framework combines sophisticated reionization simulations with empirical models of the interstellar medium (ISM) radiative transfer effects on Ly$\alpha$. We assert that the Ly$\alpha$ line profile emerging from the ISM has an important impact on the resulting transmission of photons through the IGM, and that these line profiles depend on galaxy properties. We model this effect by considering the peak velocity offset of Ly$\alpha$ lines from host galaxies' systemic redshifts, which are empirically correlated with UV luminosity and redshift (or halo mass at fixed redshift). We use our framework on the sample of LBGs presented in Pentericci et al. (2014) and infer a global neutral fraction at z~7 of $\overline{x}_\mathrm{HI} = 0.59_{-0.15}^{+0.11}$, consistent with other robust probes of the EoR and confirming reionization is on-going ~700 Myr after the Big Bang. We show that using the full distribution of Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width detections and upper limits from LBGs places tighter constraints on the evolving IGM than the standard Ly$\alpha$ emitter fraction, and that larger samples are within reach of deep spectroscopic surveys of gravitationally lensed fields and JWST NIRSpec.
  • Foreground power dominates the measurements of interferometers that seek a statistical detection of highly-redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The inherent spectral smoothness of synchrotron radiation, the dominant foreground emission mechanism, and the chromaticity of the instrument allows these experiments to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth and structured emission in Fourier space (the "wedge" or "pitchfork", and the "EoR Window", respectively). Faraday rotation can inject spectral structure into otherwise smooth polarized foreground emission, which through instrument effects or miscalibration could possibly pollute the EoR Window. Using data from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) 19-element commissioning array, we investigate the polarization response of this new instrument in the power spectrum domain. We confirm the expected structure of foreground emission in Fourier space predicted by Thyagarajan et al. (2015a, 2016) for a HERA-type dish, and detect polarized power within the pitchfork. Using simulations of the polarized response of HERA feeds, we find that almost all of the power in Stokes Q, U and V can be attributed to instrumental leakage effects. Power consistent with noise in the EoR window suggests a negligible amount of spectrally-structured polarized power, to the noise-levels attained. This lends confidence to deep integrations with HERA in the future, but with a lower noise floor these future studies will also have to investigate their polarized response.
  • We highlight recent progress in the sophistication and diversification of cosmic dawn and reionization simulations. The application of these modeling tools to current observations has allowed us narrow down the timing of reionization, which we now know to within dz ~ 1 for the bulk of reionization. The strongest constraints come from the optical depth to the CMB measured with the {\it Planck} satellite and the first detection of ongoing reionization from the spectra of the z=7.1 QSOs ULASJ1120+0641. However, we still know virtually nothing about the astrophysical sources during the first billion years. The revolution in our understanding will be led by upcoming interferometric observations of the cosmic 21-cm signal. The properties of the sources and sinks of UV and X-ray photons are encoded in the 3D patterns of the signal. The development of Bayesian parameter recovery techniques, which tap into the wealth of the 21-cm signal, will soon usher in an era of precision astrophysical cosmology.
  • We extend 21CMMC, a Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampler of 3D reionisation simulations, to perform parameter estimation directly on 3D light-cones of the cosmic 21cm signal. This brings theoretical analysis closer to the tomographic 21-cm observations achievable with next generation interferometers like HERA and the SKA. Parameter recovery can therefore account for modes which evolve with redshift/frequency. Additionally, simulated data can be more easily corrupted to resemble real data. Using the light-cone version of 21CMMC, we quantify the biases in the recovered astrophysical parameters if we use the 21cm power spectrum from the co-evolution approximation to fit a 3D light-cone mock observation. While ignoring the light-cone effect under most assumptions will not significantly bias the recovered astrophysical parameters, it can lead to an underestimation of the associated uncertainty. However significant biases ($\sim$few -- 10 $\sigma$) can occur if the 21cm signal evolves rapidly (i.e. the epochs of reionisation and heating overlap significantly) and: (i) foreground removal is very efficient, allowing large physical scales ($k\lesssim0.1$~Mpc$^{-1}$) to be used in the analysis or (ii) theoretical modelling is accurate to within $\sim10$ per cent in the power spectrum amplitude.
  • Current and upcoming radio interferometric experiments are aiming to make a statistical characterization of the high-redshift 21cm fluctuation signal spanning the hydrogen reionization and X-ray heating epochs of the universe. However, connecting 21cm statistics to underlying physical parameters is complicated by the theoretical challenge of modeling the relevant physics at computational speeds quick enough to enable exploration of the high dimensional and weakly constrained parameter space. In this work, we use machine learning algorithms to build a fast emulator that mimics expensive simulations of the 21cm signal across a wide parameter space to high precision. We embed our emulator within a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo framework, enabling it to explore the posterior distribution over a large number of model parameters, including those that govern the Epoch of Reionization, the Epoch of X-ray Heating, and cosmology. As a worked example, we use our emulator to present an updated parameter constraint forecast for the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array experiment, showing that its characterization of a fiducial 21cm power spectrum will considerably narrow the allowed parameter space of reionization and heating parameters, and could help strengthen Planck's constraints on $\sigma_8$. We provide both our generalized emulator code and its implementation specifically for 21cm parameter constraints as publicly available software.
  • Direct detection of regions of ionized hydrogen (HII) has been suggested as a promising probe of cosmic reionization. Observing the redshifted 21-cm signal of hydrogen from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is a key scientific driver behind new-generation, low-frequency radio interferometers. We investigate the feasibility of combining low-frequency observations with the Square Kilometre Array and near infra-red survey data of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope to detect cosmic reionization by imaging HII bubbles surrounding massive galaxies during the cosmic dawn. While individual bubbles will be too small to be detected, we find that by stacking redshifted 21-cm spectra centred on known galaxies, it will be possible to directly detect the EoR at $z \sim 9-12$, and to place qualitative constraints on the evolution of the spin temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at $z \geq 9$. In particular, given a detection of ionized bubbles using this technique, it is possible to determine if the IGM surrounding them is typically in absorption or emission. Determining the globally-averaged neutral fraction of the IGM using this method will prove more difficult due to degeneracy with the average size of HII regions.
  • Using a series of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations we show that during the rapid growth of high-redshift (z > 5) galaxies, reserves of molecular gas are consumed over a time-scale of 300Myr, almost independent of feedback scheme. We find that there exists no such simple relation for the total gas fractions of these galaxies, with little correlation between gas fractions and specific star formation rates. The bottleneck or limiting factor in the growth of early galaxies is in converting infalling gas to cold star-forming gas. Thus, we find that the majority of high redshift dwarf galaxies are effectively in recession, with demand (of star formation) never rising to meet supply (of gas), irrespective of the baryonic feedback physics modelled. We conclude that the basic assumption of self-regulation in galaxies - that they can adjust total gas consumption within a Hubble time - does not apply for the dwarf galaxies thought to be responsible for providing most UV photons to reionize the high redshift Universe. We demonstrate how this rapid molecular time-scale improves agreement between semi-analytic model predictions of the early Universe and observed stellar mass functions.
  • The experimental efforts to detect the redshifted 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are limited predominantly by the chromatic instrumental systematic effect. The delay spectrum methodology for 21 cm power spectrum measurements brought new attention to the critical impact of an antenna's chromaticity on the viability of making this measurement. This methodology established a straightforward relationship between time-domain response of an instrument and the power spectrum modes accessible to a 21 cm EoR experiment. We examine the performance of a prototype of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) array element that is currently observing in Karoo desert, South Africa. We present a mathematical framework to derive the beam integrated frequency response of a HERA prototype element in reception from the return loss measurements between 100-200 MHz and determined the extent of additional foreground contamination in the delay space. The measurement reveals excess spectral structures in comparison to the simulation studies of the HERA element. Combined with the HERA data analysis pipeline that incorporates inverse covariance weighting in optimal quadratic estimation of power spectrum, we find that in spite of its departure from the simulated response, HERA prototype element satisfies the necessary criteria posed by the foreground attenuation limits and potentially can measure the power spectrum at spatial modes as low as $k_{\parallel} > 0.1h$~Mpc$^{-1}$. The work highlights a straightforward method for directly measuring an instrument response and assessing its impact on 21 cm EoR power spectrum measurements for future experiments that will use reflector-type antenna.
  • By heating the intergalactic medium (IGM) before reionization, X-rays are expected to play a prominent role in the early Universe. The cosmic 21-cm signal from this "Epoch of Heating" (EoH) could serve as a clean probe of high-energy processes inside the first galaxies. Here we improve on prior estimates of this signal by using high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to calculate the X-ray absorption due to the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. X-rays absorbed inside the host galaxy are unable to escape into the IGM and contribute to the EoH. We find that the X-ray opacity through these galaxies can be approximated by a metal-free ISM with a typical column density of log[N / cm^-2] = 21.4 +0.40-0.65. We compute the resulting 21-cm signal by combining these ISM opacities with public spectra of high-mass X-ray binaries (thought to be important X-ray sources in the early Universe). Our results support "standard scenarios" in which the X-ray heating of the IGM is inhomogeneous, and occurs before the bulk of reionization. The large-scale (k ~ 0.1/Mpc) 21-cm power reaches a peak of ~100 mK^2 at z = 10 - 15, with the redshift depending on the cosmic star formation history. This is in contrast to some recent work, motivated by the much larger X-ray absorption towards local HMXBs inside the Milky Way. Our main results can be reproduced by approximating the X-ray emission from HMXBs with a power-law spectrum with energy index alpha = 1, truncated at energies below 0.5 keV.
  • Using Hubble data, including new grism spectra, Oesch et al. recently identified GN-z11, an $M_\textrm{UV}$=-21.1 galaxy at $z$=11.1 (just 400Myr after the big bang). With an estimated stellar mass of $\sim$10$^9$M$_{\odot}$, this galaxy is surprisingly bright and massive, raising questions as to how such an extreme object could form so early in the Universe. Using \Meraxes{}, a semi-analytic galaxy-formation model developed as part of the Dark-ages Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) programme, we investigate the potential formation mechanisms and eventual fate of GN-z11. The volume of our simulation is comparable to that of the discovery observations and possesses two analogue galaxies of similar luminosity to this remarkably bright system. Existing in the two most massive subhaloes at $z$=11.1 ($M_\textrm{vir}$=1.4$\times 10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$ and 6.7$\times 10^{10}$M$_{\odot}$), our model analogues show excellent agreement with all available observationally derived properties of GN-z11. Although they are relatively rare outliers from the full galaxy population at high-$z$, they are no longer the most massive or brightest systems by $z$=5. Furthermore, we find that both objects possess relatively smooth, but extremely rapid mass growth histories with consistently high star formation rates and UV luminosities at $z{>}11$, indicating that their brightness is not a transient, merger-driven feature. Our model results suggest that future wide-field surveys with the \textit{James Webb Space Telescope} may be able to detect the progenitors of GN-z11 analogues out to $z{\sim}$13--14, pushing the frontiers of galaxy-formation observations to the early phases of cosmic reionization and providing a valuable glimpse of the first galaxies to reionize the Universe on large scales.
  • We introduce an intrinsic Ly\alpha\ emission line profile reconstruction method for high-$z$ quasars (QSOs). This approach utilises a covariance matrix of emission line properties obtained from a large, moderate-$z$ ($2 \leq z \leq 2.5$), high signal to noise (S/N > 15) sample of BOSS QSOs. For each QSO, we complete a Monte Carlo Markov Chain fitting of the continuum and emission line properties and perform a visual quality assessment to construct a large database of robustly fit spectra. With this dataset, we construct a covariance matrix to describe the correlations between the high ionisation emission lines Ly\alpha, C IV, Si IV + O IV] and C III], and find it to be well approximated by an $N$-dimensional Gaussian distribution. This covariance matrix characterises the correlations between the line width, peak height and velocity offset from systemic while also allowing for the existence of broad and narrow line components for Ly\alpha\ and C IV. We illustrate how this covariance matrix allows us to statistically characterise the intrinsic Ly\alpha\ line solely from the observed spectrum redward of 1275\AA. This procedure can be used to reconstruct the intrinsic Ly\alpha\ line emission profile in cases where Ly\alpha\ may otherwise be obscured. Applying this reconstruction method to our sample of QSOs, we recovered the Ly\alpha\ line flux to within 15 per cent of the measured flux at 1205\AA\ (1220\AA) ~85 (90) per cent of the time.
  • We investigate high-redshift galaxy sizes using a semi-analytic model constructed for the Dark-ages Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulation project. Our fiducial model, including strong feedback from supernovae and photoionization background, accurately reproduces the evolution of the stellar mass function and UV luminosity function. Using this model, we study the size--luminosity relation of galaxies and find that the effective radius scales with UV luminosity as $R_\mathrm{e}\propto L^{0.25}$ at $z{\sim}5$--$9$. We show that recently discovered very luminous galaxies at $z{\sim}7$ (Bowler et al. 2016) and $z{\sim}11$ (Oesch et al. 2016) lie on our predicted size--luminosity relations. We find that a significant fraction of galaxies at $z>8$ will not be resolved by JWST, but GMT will have the ability to resolve all galaxies in haloes above the atomic cooling limit. We show that our fiducial model successfully reproduces the redshift evolution of average galaxy sizes at $z>5$. We also explore galaxy sizes in models without supernova feedback. The no-supernova feedback models produce galaxy sizes that are smaller than observations. We therefore confirm that supernova feedback plays an important role in determining the size--luminosity relation of galaxies and its redshift evolution during reionization.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization ($z=6-12$), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn ($z\sim30$). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14-m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA's scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.
  • We introduce Meraxes, a new, purpose-built semi-analytic galaxy formation model designed for studying galaxy growth during reionization. Meraxes is the first model of its type to include a temporally and spatially coupled treatment of reionization and is built upon a custom (100 Mpc)$^3$ N-body simulation with high temporal and mass resolution, allowing us to resolve the galaxy and star formation physics relevant to early galaxy formation. Our fiducial model with supernova feedback reproduces the observed optical depth to electron scattering and evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function between $z$=5 and 7, predicting that a broad range of halo masses contribute to reionization. Using a constant escape fraction and global recombination rate, our model is unable to simultaneously match the observed ionizing emissivity at $z{\lesssim}6$. However, the use of an evolving escape fraction of 0.05-0.1 at $z{\sim}6$, increasing towards higher redshift, is able to satisfy these three constraints. We also demonstrate that photoionization suppression of low mass galaxy formation during reionization has only a small effect on the ionization history of the inter-galactic medium. This lack of `self-regulation' arises due to the already efficient quenching of star formation by supernova feedback. It is only in models with gas supply-limited star formation that reionization feedback is effective at regulating galaxy growth. We similarly find that reionization has only a small effect on the stellar mass function, with no observationally detectable imprint at $M_{\rm *}{>}10^{7.5}\,{\rm M_{{\odot}}}$. However, patchy reionization has significant effects on individual galaxy masses, with variations of factors of 2-3 at $z$=5 that correlate with environment.
  • We use the Dark-ages, Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) framework to investigate the effect of galaxy-formation physics on the morphology and statistics of ionized hydrogen (HII) regions during the Epoch of Reioinization (EoR). DRAGONS self-consistently couples a semi-analytic galaxy-formation model with the inhomogeneous ionizing UV background, and can therefore be used to study the dependence of morphology and statistics of reionization on feedback phenomena of the ionizing source galaxy population. Changes in galaxy-formation physics modify the sizes of HII regions and the amplitude and shape of 21-cm power spectra. Of the galaxy physics investigated, we find that supernova feedback plays the most important role in reionization, with HII regions up to $\approx 20$ per cent smaller and a fractional difference in the amplitude of power spectra of up to $\approx 17$ per cent at fixed ionized fraction in the absence of this feedback. We compare our galaxy-formation-based reionization models with past calculations that assume constant stellar-to-halo mass ratios and find that with the correct choice of minimum halo mass, such models can mimic the predicted reionization morphology. Reionization morphology at fixed neutral fraction is therefore not uniquely determined by the details of galaxy formation, but is sensitive to the mass of the haloes hosting the bulk of the ionizing sources. Simple EoR parametrizations are therefore accurate predictors of reionization statistics. However, a complete understanding of reionization using future 21-cm observations will require interpretation with realistic galaxy-formation models, in combination with other observations.
  • We present upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at $z = 5.9$ calculated from the model-independent limit on the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium of $x_{\rm H{\small I }} < 0.06 + 0.05\ (1\sigma)$ derived from dark pixel statistics of quasar absorption spectra. Using 21CMMC, a Markov chain Monte Carlo Epoch of Reionization analysis code, we explore the probability distribution of 21 cm power spectra consistent with this constraint on the neutral fraction. We present 99 per cent confidence upper limits of $\Delta^2(k) < 10$ to $20\ {\rm mK}^2$ over a range of $k$ from 0.5 to $2.0\ h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, with the exact limit dependent on the sampled $k$ mode. This limit can be used as a null test for 21 cm experiments: a detection of power at $z=5.9$ in excess of this value is highly suggestive of residual foreground contamination or other systematic errors affecting the analysis.
  • In this paper we present calculations of the UV luminosity function from the Dark-ages Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) project, which combines N-body, semi-analytic and semi-numerical modelling designed to study galaxy formation during the Epoch of Reionization. Using galaxy formation physics including supernova feedback, the model naturally reproduces the UV LFs for high-redshift star-forming galaxies from $z{\sim}5$ through to $z{\sim}10$. We investigate the luminosity--star formation rate (SFR) relation, finding that variable SFR histories of galaxies result in a scatter around the median relation of $0.1$--$0.3$ dex depending on UV luminosity. We find close agreement between the model and observationally derived SFR functions. We use our calculated luminosities to investigate the luminosity function below current detection limits, and the ionizing photon budget for reionization. We predict that the slope of the UV LF remains steep below current detection limits and becomes flat at $M_\mathrm{UV}{\gtrsim}{-14}$. We find that $48$ ($17$) per cent of the total UV flux at $z{\sim}6$ ($10$) has been detected above an observational limit of $M_\mathrm{UV}{\sim}{-17}$, and that galaxies fainter than $M_\mathrm{UV}{\sim}{-17}$ are the main source of ionizing photons for reionization. We investigate the luminosity--stellar mass relation, and find a correlation for galaxies with $M_\mathrm{UV}{<}{-14}$ that has the form $M_*{\propto}10^{-0.47M_\mathrm{UV}}$, in good agreement with observations, but which flattens for fainter galaxies. We determine the luminosity--halo mass relation to be $M_\mathrm{vir}{\propto}10^{-0.35M_\mathrm{UV}}$, finding that galaxies with $M_\mathrm{UV}{=}{-20}$ reside in host dark matter haloes of $10^{11.0\pm 0.1}\mathrm{M_\odot}$ at $z{\sim}6$, and that this mass decreases towards high redshift.
  • We use the Fisher matrix formalism and semi-numerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between $z=5$ and $z=25$, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing $\lesssim 10\%$ constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated "wedge" or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of heating and reionization physics lead to errors on reionization parameters that are significantly greater than previously predicted. Observations over the heating epoch are able to break these degeneracies and improve our constraints considerably. For these two reasons, 21\,cm observations during the heating epoch significantly enhance our understanding of reionization as well.
  • We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) program and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation program upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programs is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z=35 to z=5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from "universal" behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (~20%) of galactic halos are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: i) halos need ~1.5 dynamical times following formation, and ii) ~2 dynamical times following a major (3:1) or minor (10:1) merger to be relaxed. This is remarkably consistent across a wide mass range. Lastly, we use a phase-space halo finder to illustrate that major mergers drive long-lived massive phase-space structures which take many dynamical times to dissipate. This can yield significant differences in the inferred mass build-up of galactic halos and we suggest that care must be taken to ensure a physically meaningful match between the galaxy-formation physics of semi-analytic models and the halo finders supplying their input.
  • We introduce the Evolution of 21-cm Structure (EOS) project: providing periodic, public releases of the latest cosmological 21-cm simulations. 21-cm interferometry is set to revolutionize studies of the Cosmic Dawn (CD) and epoch of reionization (EoR), eventually resulting in 3D maps of the first billion years of our Universe. Progress will depend on sophisticated data analysis pipelines, which are in turn tested on large-scale mock observations. Here we present the 2016 EOS data release, consisting of the largest (1.6 Gpc on side with a 1024^3 grid), public 21-cm simulations of the CD and EoR. We include calibrated, sub-grid prescriptions for inhomogeneous recombinations and photo-heating suppression of star formation in small mass galaxies. We present two simulation runs that approximately bracket the contribution from faint unseen galaxies. From these two extremes, we predict that the duration of reionization (defined as a change in the mean neutral fraction from 0.9 to 0.1) should be between 2.7 < Delta z < 5.7. The large-scale 21-cm power during the advanced EoR stages can be different by up to a factor of ~10, depending on the model. This difference has a comparable contribution from: (i) the typical bias of sources; and (ii) a more efficient negative feedback in models with an extended EoR driven by faint galaxies. We also make detectability forecasts. With a 1000h integration, HERA and SKA1-low should achieve a signal-to-noise of ~few-hundreds throughout the EoR/CD, while in the maximally optimistic scenario of perfect foreground cleaning, all instruments should make a statistical detection of the cosmic signal. We also caution that our ability to clean foregrounds determines the relative performance of narrow/deep vs. wide/shallow surveys expected with SKA1. Our 21-cm power spectra, simulation outputs and visualizations are publicly available.