• Radial velocity measurements are presented for 85 late M- and L-type very low mass stars and brown dwarfs obtained with the Magellan Echellette (MagE) spectrograph. Targets primarily have distances within 20 pc of the Sun, with more distant sources selected for their unusual spectral energy distributions. We achieved precisions of 2--3 km/s, and combined these with astrometric and spectrophotometric data to calculate $UVW$ velocities. Most are members of the thin disk of the Galaxy, and velocity dispersions indicate a mean age of 5.2$\pm$0.2 Gyr for sources within 20 pc. We find significantly different kinematic ages between late-M dwarfs (4.0$\pm$0.2 Gyr) and L dwarfs (6.5$\pm$0.4 Gyr) in our sample that are contrary to predictions from prior simulations. This difference appears to be driven by a dispersed population of unusually blue L dwarfs which may be more prevalent in our local volume-limited sample than in deeper magnitude-limited surveys. The L dwarfs exhibit an asymmetric $U$ velocity distribution with a net inward flow, similar to gradients recently detected in local stellar samples. Simulations incorporating brown dwarf evolution and Galactic orbital dynamics are unable to reproduce the velocity asymmetry, suggesting non-axisymmetric perturbations or two distinct L dwarf populations. We also find the L dwarfs to have a kinematic age-activity correlation similar to more massive stars. We identify several sources with low surface gravities, and two new substellar candidate members of nearby young moving groups: the astrometric binary DENIS J08230313$-$4912012AB, a low-probability member of the $\beta$ Pictoris Moving Group; and 2MASS J15104786-2818174, a moderate-probability member of the 30-50 Myr Argus Association.
  • Kinematic investigations are being increasingly deployed in studies of the lowest mass stars and brown dwarfs to investigate their origins, characterize their atmospheres, and examine the evolution of their physical parameters. This article summarizes the contributions made at the Kinematics of Very Low Mass Dwarfs Splinter Session. Results discussed include analysis of kinematic distributions of M, L and T dwarfs; theoretical tools for interpreting these distributions; identifications of very low mass halo dwarfs and wide companions to nearby stars; radial velocity variability among young and very cool brown dwarfs; and the search and identification of M dwarfs in young moving groups. A summary of discussion points at the conclusion of the Splinter is also presented.
  • We report the identification of the M9 dwarf SDSS J000649.16-085246.3 as a spectral binary and radial velocity variable with components straddling the hydrogen burning mass limit. Low-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy reveals spectral features indicative of a T dwarf companion, and spectral template fitting yields component types of M8.5\pm0.5 and T5\pm1. High-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy with Keck/NIRSPEC reveals pronounced radial velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of 8.2\pm0.4 km/s. From these we determine an orbital period of 147.6\pm1.5 days and eccentricity of 0.10\pm0.07, making SDSS J0006-0852AB the third tightest very low mass binary known. This system is also found to have a common proper motion companion, the inactive M7 dwarf LP 704-48, at a projected separation of 820\pm120 AU. The lack of H-alpha emission in both M dwarf components indicates that this system is relatively old, as confirmed by evolutionary model analysis of the tight binary. LP 704-48/SDSS J0006-0852AB is the lowest-mass confirmed triple identified to date, and one of only seven candidate and confirmed triples with total masses below 0.3 Msun currently known. We show that current star and brown dwarf formation models cannot produce triple systems like LP 704-48/SDSS J0006-0852AB, and we rule out Kozai-Lidov perturbations and tidal circularization as a viable mechanism to shrink the inner orbit. The similarities between this system and the recently uncovered low-mass eclipsing triples NLTT 41135AB/41136 and LHS 6343ABC suggest that substellar tertiaries may be common in wide M dwarf pairs.
  • TWA 30 is a remarkable young (7+/-3 Myr), low-mass (0.12+/-0.04 Msun), late-type star (M5+/-1) residing 42+/-2 pc away from the sun in the TW Hydrae Association. It shows strong outflow spectral signatures such as [S II], [O I], [O II], [O III], and Mg I], while exhibiting weak Halpha emission (-6.8+/-1.2 Angstroms). Emission lines of [S II] and [O I] are common to T Tauri stars still residing in their natal molecular clouds, while [O III] and Mg I] emission lines are incredibly rare in this same population; in the case of TWA 30, these latter lines may arise from new outflow material colliding into older outflow fronts. The weak Halpha emission and small radial velocity shifts of line emission relative to the stellar frame of rest (generally <=10 km/s) suggest that the disk is viewed close to edge-on and that the stellar axis may be inclined to the disk, similar to the AA Tau system, based on its temporal changes in emission/absorption line strengths/profiles and variable reddening (A_V=1.5-9.0). The strong Li absorption (0.61+/-0.13 Angstroms) and common kinematics with members of the TWA confirm its age and membership to the association. Given the properties of this system such as its proximity, low mass, remarkable outflow signatures, variability, and edge-on configuration, this system is a unique case study at a critical time in disk evolution and planet-building processes.