• We present the first results of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS), a project aimed at measuring the proper motion and trigonometric parallax of a large sample of young stars in nearby regions using multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio observations. Enough VLBA detections have now been obtained for 16 stellar systems in Ophiuchus to derive their parallax and proper motion. This leads to distance determinations for individual stars with an accuracy of 0.3 to a few percent. In addition, the orbits of 6 multiple systems were modelled by combining absolute positions with VLBA (and in some cases, near infrared) angular separations. Twelve stellar systems are located in the dark cloud Lynds 1688, the individual distances for this sample are highly consistent with one another, and yield a mean parallax for Lynds 1688 of $\varpi=7.28\pm0.06$ mas, corresponding to a distance $d=137.3\pm1.2$ pc. This represents an accuracy better than 1%. Three systems for which astrometric elements could be measured are located in the eastern streamer (Lynds 1689) and yield an estimate of $\varpi=6.79\pm0.16$ mas, corresponding to a distance $d=147.3\pm3.4$ pc. This suggests that the eastern streamer is located about 10 pc farther than the core, but this conclusion needs to be confirmed by observations (currently being collected) of additional sources in the eastern streamer. From the measured proper motions, we estimate the one-dimensional velocity dispersion in Lynds 1688 to be 2.8$\pm$1.8 and 3.0$\pm$2.0 ${\rm km~s}^{-1}$, in R.A. and DEC., respectively, these are larger than, but still consistent within $1\sigma$, with those found in other studies.
  • We report on new distances and proper motions to seven stars across the Serpens/Aquila complex. The observations were obtained as part of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) project between September 2013 and April 2016 with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). One of our targets is the proto-Herbig AeBe object EC 95, which is a binary system embedded in the Serpens Core. For this system, we combined the GOBELINS observations with previous VLBA data to cover a total period of ~8 years, and derive the orbital elements and an updated source distance. The individual distances to sources in the complex are fully consistent with each other, and the mean value corresponds to a distance of $436.0\pm9.2$~pc for the Serpens/W40 complex. Given this new evidence, we argue that Serpens Main, W40 and Serpens South are physically associated and form a single cloud structure.
  • We present the results of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) of young star forming regions towards the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. We detected 36 YSOs with the Very Large Baseline Array (VLBA), 27 of which have been observed in at least 3 epochs over the course of 2 years. At least half of these YSOs belong to multiple systems. We obtained parallax and proper motions towards these stars to study the structure and kinematics of the Complex. We measured a distance of 388$\pm$5 pc towards the Orion Nebula Cluster, 428$\pm$10 pc towards the southern portion L1641, 388$\pm$10 pc towards NGC 2068, and roughly $\sim$420 pc towards NGC 2024. Finally, we observed a strong degree of plasma radio scattering towards $\lambda$ Ori.
  • We use high time cadence, high spectral resolution optical observations to detect excess H-alpha emission from the 2 - 3 Myr old weak lined T Tauri star PTFO8-8695. This excess emission appears to move in velocity as expected if it were produced by the suspected planetary companion to this young star. The excess emission is not always present, but when it is, the predicted velocity motion is often observed. We have considered the possibility that the observed excess emission is produced by stellar activity (flares), accretion from a disk, or a planetary companion; we find the planetary companion to be the most likely explanation. If this is the case, the strength of the H-alpha line indicates that the emission comes from an extended volume around the planet, likely fed by mass loss from the planet which is expected to be overflowing its Roche lobe.
  • We present multi-epoch, large-scale ($\sim$ 2000 arcmin${}^2$), fairly deep ($\sim$ 16 $\mu$Jy), high-resolution ($\sim$ 1") radio observations of the Perseus star-forming complex obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at frequencies of 4.5 GHz and 7.5 GHz. These observations were mainly focused on the clouds NGC 1333 and IC 348, although we also observed several fields in other parts of the Perseus complex. We detect a total of 206 sources, 42 of which are associated with young stellar objects (YSOs). The radio properties of about 60% of the YSOs are compatible with a non-thermal radio emission origin. Based on our sample, we find a fairly clear relation between the prevalence of non-thermal radio emission and evolutionary status of the YSOs. By comparing our results with previously reported X-ray observations, we show that YSOs in Perseus follow a G\"udel-Benz relation with $\kappa$ = 0.03 consistent with other regions of star formation. We argue that most of the sources detected in our observations but not associated with known YSOs are extragalactic, but provide a list of 20 unidentified radio sources whose radio properties are consistent with being YSO candidates. Finally we also detect 5 sources with extended emission features which can clearly be associated with radio galaxies.
  • We present a multi-epoch radio study of the Taurus-Auriga star-forming complex made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at frequencies of 4.5 GHz and 7.5 GHz. We detect a total of 610 sources, 59 of which are related to young stellar objects and 18 to field stars. The properties of 56\% of the young stars are compatible with non-thermal radio emission. We also show that the radio emission of more evolved young stellar objects tends to be more non-thermal in origin and, in general, that their radio properties are compatible with those found in other star forming regions. By comparing our results with previously reported X-ray observations, we notice that young stellar objects in Taurus-Auriga follow a G\"{u}del-Benz relation with $\kappa$=0.03, as we previously suggested for other regions of star formation. In general, young stellar objects in Taurus-Auriga and in all the previous studied regions seem to follow this relation with a dispersion of $\sim1$ dex. Finally, we propose that most of the remaining sources are related with extragalactic objects but provide a list of 46 unidentified radio sources whose radio properties are compatible with a YSO nature.
  • We present results from a high-sensitivity (60 $\mu$Jy), large-scale (2.26 square degree) survey obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array as part of the Gould's Belt Survey program. We detected 374 and 354 sources at 4.5 and 7.5 GHz, respectively. Of these, 148 are associated with previously known Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). Another 86 sources previously unclassified at either optical or infrared wavelengths exhibit radio properties that are consistent with those of young stars. The overall properties of our sources at radio wavelengths such as their variability and radio to X-ray luminosity relation are consistent with previous results from the Gould's Belt Survey. Our detections provide target lists for followup VLBA radio observations to determine their distances as YSOs are located in regions of high nebulosity and extinction, making it difficult to measure optical parallaxes.
  • We present large-scale ($\sim$ 2000 square arcminutes), deep ($\sim$ 20 $\mu$Jy), high-resolution ($\sim$ 1$''$) radio observations of the Ophiuchus star-forming complex obtained with the Karl G.\ Jansky Very Large Array at $\lambda$ = 4 and 6 cm. In total, 189 sources were detected, 56 of them associated with known young stellar sources, and 4 with known extragalactic objects; the other 129 remain unclassified, but most of them are most probably background quasars. The vast majority of the young stars detected at radio wavelengths have spectral types K or M, although we also detect 4 objects of A/F/B types and 2 brown dwarf candidates. At least half of these young stars are non-thermal (gyrosynchrotron) sources, with active coronas characterized by high levels of variability, negative spectral indices, and (in some cases) significant circular polarization. As expected, there is a clear tendency for the fraction of non-thermal sources to increase from the younger (Class 0/I or flat spectrum) to the more evolved (Class III or weak line T Tauri) stars. The young stars detected both in X-rays and at radio wavelengths broadly follow a G\"udel-Benz relation, but with a different normalization than the most radio-active types of stars. Finally, we detect a $\sim$ 70 mJy compact extragalactic source near the center of the Ophiuchus core, which should be used as gain calibrator for any future radio observations of this region.
  • We report observations of a possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star in the 7-10 Myr old Orion-OB1a/25-Ori region. The candidate was found as part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project. It has a photometric transit period of 0.448413 +- 0.000040 days, and appears in both 2009 and 2010 PTF data. Follow-up low-precision radial velocity (RV) observations and adaptive optics imaging suggest that the star is not an eclipsing binary, and that it is unlikely that a background source is blended with the target and mimicking the observed transit. RV observations with the Hobby-Eberly and Keck telescopes yield an RV that has the same period as the photometric event, but is offset in phase from the transit center by approximately -0.22 periods. The amplitude (half range) of the RV variations is 2.4 km/s and is comparable with the expected RV amplitude that stellar spots could induce. The RV curve is likely dominated by stellar spot modulation and provides an upper limit to the projected companion mass of M_p sin i_orb < 4.8 +- 1.2 M_Jup; when combined with the orbital inclination, i orb, of the candidate planet from modeling of the transit light curve, we find an upper limit on the mass of the planetary candidate of M_p < 5.5 +- 1.4 M_Jup. This limit implies that the planet is orbiting close to, if not inside, its Roche limiting orbital radius, so that it may be undergoing active mass loss and evaporation.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is an experiment within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide field of view available using the PTF camera at the Palomar 48" telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in December 2009-January 2010 to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10Myr) 25 Ori association. The primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper we describe the survey and data reduction pipeline, and present initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which we are candidate 25 Ori- or Orion OB1a-association members. Of these, 2 are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include 6 of the candidate young systems. 45 of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems; one shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 \pm 0.0000071d, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known (CVSO 35) and one previously reported as a candidate weak-line T-Tauri star (SDSS J052700.12+010136.8).
  • We ask if Earth-like planets (terrestrial mass and habitable-zone orbit) can be detected in multi-planet systems, using astrometric and radial velocity observations. We report here the preliminary results of double-blind calculations designed to answer this question.
  • Direct angular size measurements of the G0IV subgiant $\eta$ Boo from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer are presented, with limb-darkened angular size of $\theta_{LD}= 2.1894^{+0.0055}_{-0.0140} $ mas, which indicate a linear radius of $R=2.672 \pm 0.028 R_\odot$. A bolometric flux estimate of $F_{BOL} = 22.1 \pm 0.28\times 10^{-7}$ erg cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ is computed, which indicates an effective temperature of $T_{EFF}=6100 \pm 28$ K and luminosity of $L = 8.89 \pm 0.16 L_\odot$ for this object. Similar data are established for a check star, HD 121860. The $\eta$ Boo results are compared to, and confirm, similar parameters established by the {\it MOST} asteroseismology satellite. In conjunction with the mass estimate from the {\it MOST} investigation, a surface gravity of $\log g=3.817 \pm 0.016$ [cm s$^{-2}$] is established for $\eta$ Boo.
  • Using the CHARA Array and the Palomar Testbed Interferometer, the chemically peculiar star $\lambda$ Bo\"{o}tis has been spatially resolved. We have measured the limb darkened angular diameter to be $\theta_{LD} = 0.533\pm0.029$ mas, corresponding to a linear radius of $R_{\star} = 1.70 \pm 0.10 R_\odot$. The measured angular diameter yields an effective temperature for $\lambda$ Boo of $T_{eff} = 8887 \pm 242$ K. Based upon literature surface gravity estimates spanning $\log{(g)} = 4.0-4.2$ $[\rm{cm s}^{-\rm{2}}]$, we have derived a stellar mass range of $M_{\star} = 1.1 - 1.7$ $M_\odot$. For a given surface gravity, the linear radius uncertainty contributes approximately $\sigma(M_\star) = 0.1-0.2 M_\odot$ to the total mass uncertainty. The uncertainty in the mass (i.e., the range of derived masses) is primarily a result of the uncertainty in the surface gravity. The upper bound of our derived mass range ($\log(g)=4.2, M_\star = 1.7\pm0.2 M_\odot$) is consistent with 100-300 MYr solar-metallicity evolutionary models. The mid-range of our derived masses ($\log(g)=4.1, M_\star = 1.3\pm0.2 M_\odot$) is consistent with 2-3 GYr metal-poor evolutionary models. A more definitive surface gravity determination is required to determine a more precise mass for $\lambda$ Boo.
  • We report spectroscopic and interferometric observations of the high-proper motion double-lined binary system HD 9939, with an orbital period of approximately 25 days. By combining our radial-velocity and visibility measurements we estimate the system physical orbit and derive dynamical masses for the components of $M_A = 1.072 \pm 0.014$ M$_{\sun}$ and $M_B = 0.8383 \pm 0.0081$ M$_{\sun}$; fractional errors of 1.3% and 1.0%, respectively. We also determine a system distance of $42.23 \pm 0.21$ pc, corresponding to an orbital parallax of $\pi_{\rm orb} = 23.68 \pm 0.12$ mas. The system distance and the estimated brightness difference between the stars in $V$, $H$, and $K$ yield component absolute magnitudes in these bands. By spectroscopic analysis and spectral energy distribution modeling we also estimate the component effective temperatures and luminosities as $T_{\rm eff}^A = 5050 \pm 100$ K and $T_{\rm eff}^B = 4950 \pm 200$ K and $L_A$ = 2.451 $\pm$ 0.041 $L_{\sun}$ and $L_B$ = 0.424 $\pm$ 0.023 $L_{\sun}$. Both our spectral analysis and comparison with stellar models suggest that HD 9939 has elemental abundances near solar values. Further, comparison with stellar models suggests the HD 9939 primary has evolved off the main sequence and appears to be traversing the Hertzsprung gap as it approaches the red giant phase of its evolution. Our measurements of the primary properties provide new empirical constraints on stellar models during this particularly dynamic evolutionary phase. That HD 9939 is currently in a relatively short-lived evolutionary state allows us to estimate the system age as 9.12 $\pm$ 0.25 Gyr. In turn the age and abundance of the system place a potentially interesting, if anecdotal, constraint on star formation in the galactic disk.
  • We report on a significantly improved determination of the physical orbit of the double-lined spectroscopic binary system 12 Boo. We have a 12 Boo interferometry dataset spanning six years with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer, a smaller amount of data from the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer, and a radial velocity dataset spanning 14 years from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. We have updated the 12 Boo physical orbit model with our expanded interferometric and radial velocity datasets. The revised orbit is in good agreement with previous results, and the physical parameters implied by a combined fit to our visibility and radial velocity data result in precise component masses and luminosities. In particular, the orbital parallax of the system is determined to be 27.74 $\pm$ 0.15 mas, and masses of the two components are determined to be 1.4160 $\pm$ 0.0049 M$_{\sun}$ and 1.3740 $\pm$ 0.0045 M$_{\sun}$, respectively. Based on theoretical models we can estimate a system age of approximately 3.2 Gyr. Comparisons with stellar models suggest that the 12 Boo primary may be just entering the Hertzsprung gap, but that conclusion is highly dependent on details of the models. Such a dynamic evolutionary state makes the 12 Boo system a unique and important test for stellar models.