• We report the discovery of KELT-2Ab, a hot Jupiter transiting the bright (V=8.77) primary star of the HD 42176 binary system. The host is a slightly evolved late F-star likely in the very short-lived "blue-hook" stage of evolution, with $\teff=6148\pm48{\rm K}$, $\log{g}=4.030_{-0.026}^{+0.015}$ and $\feh=0.034\pm0.78$. The inferred stellar mass is $M_*=1.314_{-0.060}^{+0.063}$\msun\ and the star has a relatively large radius of $R_*=1.836_{-0.046}^{+0.066}$\rsun. The planet is a typical hot Jupiter with period $4.11379\pm0.00001$ days and a mass of $M_P=1.524\pm0.088$\mj\ and radius of $R_P=1.290_{-0.050}^{+0.064}$\rj. This is mildly inflated as compared to models of irradiated giant planets at the $\sim$4 Gyr age of the system. KELT-2A is the third brightest star with a transiting planet identified by ground-based transit surveys, and the ninth brightest star overall with a transiting planet. KELT-2Ab's mass and radius are unique among the subset of planets with $V<9$ host stars, and therefore increases the diversity of bright benchmark systems. We also measure the relative motion of KELT-2A and -2B over a baseline of 38 years, robustly demonstrating for the first time that the stars are bound. This allows us to infer that KELT-2B is an early K-dwarf. We hypothesize that through the eccentric Kozai mechanism KELT-2B may have emplaced KELT-2Ab in its current orbit. This scenario is potentially testable with Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements, which should have an amplitude of $\sim$44 m s$^{-1}$.
  • We present the discovery of KELT-1b, the first transiting low-mass companion from the wide-field Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope-North (KELT-North) survey. The V=10.7 primary is a mildly evolved, solar-metallicity, mid-F star. The companion is a low-mass brown dwarf or super-massive planet with mass of 27.23+/-0.50 MJ and radius of 1.110+0.037-0.024 RJ, on a very short period (P=1.21750007) circular orbit. KELT-1b receives a large amount of stellar insolation, with an equilibrium temperature assuming zero albedo and perfect redistribution of 2422 K. Upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth indicate that either the companion must have a non-zero albedo, or it must experience some energy redistribution. Comparison with standard evolutionary models for brown dwarfs suggests that the radius of KELT-1b is significantly inflated. Adaptive optics imaging reveals a candidate stellar companion to KELT-1, which is consistent with an M dwarf if bound. The projected spin-orbit alignment angle is consistent with zero stellar obliquity, and the vsini of the primary is consistent with tidal synchronization. Given the extreme parameters of the KELT-1 system, we expect it to provide an important testbed for theories of the emplacement and evolution of short-period companions, and theories of tidal dissipation and irradiated brown dwarf atmospheres.
  • We present rotation periods for 71 single dwarf members of the open cluster NGC6811 determined using photometry from NASA's Kepler Mission. The results are the first from The Kepler Cluster Study which combine Kepler's photometry with ground-based spectroscopy for cluster membership and binarity. The rotation periods delineate a tight sequence in the NGC6811 color-period diagram from ~1 day at mid-F to ~11 days at early-K spectral type. This result extends to ~1 Gyr similar prior results in the ~600 Myr Hyades and Praesepe clusters, suggesting that rotation periods for cool dwarf stars delineate a well-defined surface in the 3-dimensional space of color (mass), rotation, and age. It implies that reliable ages can be derived for field dwarf stars with measured colors and rotation periods, and it promises to enable further understanding of various aspects of stellar rotation and activity for cool stars.
  • We determine the distance to the open cluster NGC 2264 using a statistical analysis of cluster member inclinations. We derive distance-dependent values of sin i (where i is the inclination angle) for 97 stars in NGC 2264 from the rotation periods, luminosities, effective temperatures, and projected equatorial rotation velocities, v sin i, measured for these stars. We have measured 96 of the v sin i values in our sample by analyzing high-resolution spectra with a cross-correlation technique. We model the observed distribution of sin i for the cluster by assuming that member stars have random axial orientations and by adopting prescriptions for the measurement errors in our sample. By adjusting the distance assumed in the observed sin i distribution until it matches the modeled distribution, we obtain a best-fit distance for the cluster. We find the data to be consistent with a distance to NGC 2264 of 913 pc. Quantitative tests of our analysis reveals uncertainties of 40 and 110 pc due to sampling and systematic effects, respectively. This distance estimate suggests a revised age for the cluster of 1.5 Myrs, although more detailed investigations of the full cluster membership are required to draw strong conclusions.
  • We report the detection of eclipses in GJ 3236, a bright (I = 11.6) very low mass binary system with an orbital period of 0.77 days. Analysis of light- and radial velocity curves of the system yielded component masses of 0.38 +/- 0.02 and 0.28 +/- 0.02 Msol. The central values for the stellar radii are larger than the theoretical models predict for these masses, in agreement with the results for existing eclipsing binaries, although the present 5% observational uncertainties limit the significance of the larger radii to approximately 1 sigma. Degeneracies in the light curve models resulting from the unknown configuration of surface spots on the components of GJ 3236 currently dominate the uncertainties in the radii, and could be reduced by obtaining precise, multi-band photometry covering the full orbital period. The system appears to be tidally synchronized and shows signs of high activity levels as expected for such a short orbital period, evidenced by strong Halpha emission lines in the spectra of both components. These observations probe an important region of mass-radius parameter space around the predicted transition to fully-convective stellar interiors, where there are a limited number of precise measurements available in the literature.
  • We have obtained 1087 NIR (JHKs) measurements of 21 SNe Ia using PAIRITEL, nearly doubling the number of well-sampled NIR SN Ia light curves. These data strengthen the evidence that SNe Ia are excellent standard candles in the NIR, even without correction for optical light-curve shape. We construct fiducial NIR templates for normal SNe Ia from our sample, excluding only the three known peculiar SNe Ia: SN 2005bl, SN 2005hk, and SN 2005ke. The H-band absolute magnitudes in this sample of 18 SNe Ia have an intrinsic rms of only 0.15 mag with no correction for light-curve shape. We found a relationship between the H-band extinction and optical color excess of AH=0.2E(B-V). This variation is as small as the scatter in distance modulus measurements currently used for cosmology based on optical light curves after corrections for light-curve shape. Combining the homogeneous PAIRITEL measurements with 23 SNe Ia from the literature, these 41 SNe Ia have standard H-band magnitudes with an rms scatter of 0.16 mag. The good match of our sample with the literature sample suggests there are few systematic problems with the photometry. We present a nearby NIR Hubble diagram that shows no correlation of the residuals from the Hubble line with light-curve properties. Future samples that account for optical and NIR light-curve shapes, absorption, spectroscopic variation, or host-galaxy properties may reveal effective ways to improve the use of SNe Ia as distance indicators. Since systematic errors due to dust absorption in optical bands remain the leading difficulty in the cosmological use of supernovae, the good behavior of SN Ia NIR light curves and their relative insensitivity to reddening make these objects attractive candidates for future cosmological work.
  • Stars of late-M and L spectral types, collectively known as Ultracool Dwarfs (UCDs), may be excellent targets for searches for extrasolar planets. Owing to their small radii, the signal from an Earth-size planet transiting a UCD is, in principle, readily detectable. We present results from a study designed to evaluate the feasibility of using precise near infrared (NIR) photometry to detect terrestrial extrasolar planets orbiting UCDs. We used the Peters Automated InfRared Imaging TELescope (PAIRITEL) to observe a sample of 13 UCDs over a period of 10 months. We consider several important systematic effects in NIR differential photometry and develop techniques for generating photometry with a precision of 0.01 mag and long-term stability. We simulate the planet detection efficiency of an extended campaign to monitor a large sample of UCDs with PAIRITEL. We find that both a targeted campaign with a single telescope lasting several years and a campaign making use of a network of telescopes distributed in longitude could provide significant sensitivity to terrestrial planets orbiting UCDs, potentially in the habitable zone.
  • We present results from 1078 high resolution spectra of 990 stars in the young open cluster NGC 2264, obtained with the Hectochelle multiobject echelle spectrograph on the 6.5m MMT. We confirm 471 stars as members, based on their radial velocity and/or H-alpha emission. The radial velocity distribution of cluster members is non-Gaussian with a dispersion of approx 3.5 km/s. We find a substantial north-south velocity gradient and spatially coherent structure inthe radial velocity distribution, similar to that seen in the molecular gas in the region. Our results suggest that there are at least three distinguishable subclusters in NGC 2264, correlated with similar structure seen in 13CO emission, which is likely to be a remnant of initial structure in this very young cluster. We propose that this substructure is the result of gravitational amplification of initial inhomogeneities during overall collapse to a filamentary distribution of gas and stars, as found in simulations by Burkert & Hartman (2004).
  • We present results from 1351 high resolution spectra of 1215 stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the surrounding Orion 1c association, obtained with the Hectochelle multiobject echelle spectrograph on the 6.5m MMT. We confirmed 1111 stars as members, based on their radial velocity and/or H-alpha emission. The radial velocity distribution of members shows a dispersion of 3.1 km/s. We found a substantial north-south velocity gradient and spatially coherent structure in the radial velocity distribution, similar to that seen in the molecular gas in the region. We also identified several binary and high velocity stars, a region exhibiting signs of triggered star formation, and a possible foreground population of stars somewhat older than the ONC. Stars without infrared excesses (as detected with the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope) exhibit a wider spread in radial velocity than the infrared excess stars; this spread is mostly due to a blue-shifted population of stars that may constitute a foreground population. We also identify some accreting stars, based on H-alpha, that do not have detectable infrared excesses with IRAC, and thus are potential transitional disk systems (objects with inner disk holes). We propose that the substructure seen both in stellar and gaseous component is the result of non-uniform gravitational collapse to a filamentary distribution of gas. The spatial and kinematic correlation between the stellar and gaseous components suggests the region is very young, probably only ~1 crossing time old or less to avoid shock dissipation and gravitational interactions which would tend to destroy the correlation between stars and gas.