• We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 48 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) detected in the LABOCA/ACT Survey of Clusters at All Redshifts, LASCAR, which acquired new 870 $\mu$m and ATCA 2.1 GHz observations of ten galaxy clusters detected through their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signal by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. Far-infrared observations were also conducted with the PACS (100/160 $\mu$m) and SPIRE (250/350/500 $\mu$m) instruments on $Herschel$ for sample subsets of five and six clusters. LASCAR 870 $\mu$m, maps were reduced using a multi-scale iterative pipeline that removes the SZE increment signal, yielding point-source sensitivities of $\sigma\sim2\rm{\,mJy\,beam}^{-1}$. We detect in total 49 sources at the $4\sigma$ level, and conduct a detailed multi-wavelength analysis considering our new radio and far-IR observations plus existing near-IR and optical data. One source is identified as a foreground galaxy, 28 SMGs are matched to single radio sources, 4 have double radio counterparts, and 16 are undetected at 2.1 GHz but tentatively associated in some cases to near-IR/optical sources. We estimate photometric redshifts for 34 sources with secure (25) and tentative (9) matches at different wavelengths, obtaining a median $z=2.8^{+2.1}_{-1.7}$. Compared to previous results for single-dish surveys, our redshift distribution has a comparatively larger fraction of sources at $z>3$ and the high-redshift tail is more extended. This is consistent with millimeter spectroscopic confirmation of a growing number of high-$z$ SMGs and relevant for testing of cosmological models. Analytical lens modeling is applied to estimate magnification factors for 42 SMGs at cluster-centric radii $>1.2$'; with the demagnified flux densities and source-plane areas, we obtain integral number counts that agree with previous submillimeter surveys.
  • We present results from an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 2 program to map CO(2-1) emission in nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) that host circumnuclear gas disks. We obtained $\sim0.3''-$resolution Band 6 observations of seven ETGs selected on the basis of dust disks in Hubble Space Telescope images. We detect CO emission in five at high signal-to-noise ratio with the remaining two only faintly detected. All CO emission is coincident with the dust and is in dynamically cold rotation. Four ETGs show evidence of rapid central rotation; these are prime candidates for higher-resolution ALMA observations to measure the black hole masses. In this paper we focus on the molecular gas and continuum properties. Total gas masses and H$_2$ column densities for our five CO-bright galaxies are on average $\sim10^8$ $M_\odot$ and $\sim10^{22.5}$ cm$^{-2}$ over the $\sim$kpc-scale disks, and analysis suggests that these disks are stabilized against gravitational fragmentation. The continuum emission of all seven galaxies is dominated by a central, unresolved source, and in five we also detect a spatially extended component. The $\sim$230 GHz nuclear continua are modeled as power laws ranging from $S_\nu \sim \nu^{-0.4}$ to $\nu^{1.6}$ within the observed frequency band. The extended continuum profiles of the two radio-bright (and CO-faint) galaxies are roughly aligned with their radio jet and suggests resolved synchrotron jets. The extended continua of the CO-bright disks are coincident with optically thick dust absorption and have spectral slopes that are consistent with thermal dust emission.
  • We present the detection of a giant radio halo (GRH) in the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ)-selected merging galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0256.5+0006 ($z = 0.363$), observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 325 MHz and 610 MHz. We find this cluster to host a faint ($S_{610} = 5.6 \pm 1.4$ mJy) radio halo with an angular extent of 2.6 arcmin, corresponding to 0.8 Mpc at the cluster redshift, qualifying it as a GRH. J0256 is one of the lowest-mass systems, $M_{\rm 500,SZ} = (5.0 \pm 1.2) \times 10^{14} M_\odot$, found to host a GRH. We measure the GRH at lower significance at 325 MHz ($S_{325} = 10.3 \pm 5.3$ mJy), obtaining a spectral index measurement of $\alpha^{610}_{325} = 1.0^{+0.7}_{-0.9}$. This result is consistent with the mean spectral index of the population of typical radio halos, $\alpha = 1.2 \pm 0.2$. Adopting the latter value, we determine a 1.4 GHz radio power of $P_{1.4\text{GHz}} = (1.0 \pm 0.3) \times 10^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, placing this cluster within the scatter of known scaling relations. Various lines of evidence, including the ICM morphology, suggest that ACT-CL J0256.5+0006 is composed of two subclusters. We determine a merger mass ratio of 7:4, and a line-of-sight velocity difference of $v_\perp = 1880 \pm 280$ km s$^{-1}$. We construct a simple merger model to infer relevant time-scales in the merger. From its location on the $P_{\rm 1.4GHz}{-}L_{\rm X}$ scaling relation, we infer that we observe ACT-CL J0256.5+0006 approximately 500 Myr before first core crossing.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 3 observations of CO(2-1) emission from the circumnuclear disk in the E/S0 galaxy NGC 1332 at 0.044" resolution. The disk exhibits regular rotational kinematics and central high-velocity emission (+/-500 km/s) consistent with the presence of a compact central mass. We construct models for a thin, dynamically cold disk in the gravitational potential of the host galaxy and black hole, and fit the beam-smeared model line profiles directly to the ALMA data cube. Model fits successfully reproduce the disk kinematics out to r=200 pc. Fitting models just to spatial pixels within projected r=50 pc of the nucleus (two times larger than the black hole's gravitational radius of influence), we find M_BH=6.64(-0.63,+0.65)*10^8 solar masses. This observation demonstrates ALMA's powerful capability to determine the masses of supermassive black holes by resolving gas kinematics on small angular scales in galaxy nuclei.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of eleven Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect (SZE)-selected galaxy clusters (ten with new data) from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. We have obtained new imaging from the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (345GHz; LABOCA) on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array (2.1GHz; ATCA), and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (250, 350, and $500\,\rm\mu m$; SPIRE) on the Herschel Space Observatory. Spatially-resolved 345GHz SZE increments with integrated S/N > 5 are found in six clusters. We compute 2.1GHz number counts as a function of cluster-centric radius and find significant enhancements in the counts of bright sources at projected radii $\theta < \theta_{2500}$. By extrapolating in frequency, we predict that the combined signals from 2.1GHz-selected radio sources and 345GHz-selected SMGs contaminate the 148GHz SZE decrement signal by ~5% and the 345GHz SZE increment by ~18%. After removing radio source and SMG emission from the SZE signals, we use ACT, LABOCA, and (in some cases) new Herschel SPIRE imaging to place constraints on the clusters' peculiar velocities. The sample's average peculiar velocity relative to the cosmic microwave background is $153\pm 383\,\rm km\,s^{-1}$.
  • We present multiline CO observations of the complex submillimeter galaxy SMM J00266+1708. Using the Zpectrometer on the Green Bank Telescope, we provide the first precise spectroscopic measurement of its redshift (z=2.742). Based on followup CO(1-0), CO(3-2), and CO(5-4) mapping, SMM J00266+1708 appears to have two distinct components separated by ~500 km/s that are nearly coincident along our line of sight. The two components show hints of different kinematics, with the blue-shifted component dispersion-dominated and the red-shifted component showing a clear velocity gradient. CO line ratios differ slightly between the two components, indicating that the physical conditions in their molecular gas may not be alike. We tentatively infer that SMM J00266+1708 is an ongoing merger with a mass ratio of (7.8+/-4.0)/sin^2(i), with its overall size and surface brightness closely resembling that of other merging systems. We perform large velocity gradient modeling of the CO emission from both components and find that each component's properties are consistent with a single phase of molecular gas (i.e., a single temperatures and density); additional multi-phase modeling of the red-shifted component, although motivated by a CO(1-0) size larger than the CO(3-2) size, is inconclusive. SMM J00266+1708 provides evidence of early stage mergers within the submillimeter galaxy population. Continuum observations of J00266 at the ~1" resolution of our observations could not have distinguished between the two components due to their separation (0.73" +/- 0.06"), illustrating that the additional velocity information provided by spectral line studies is important for addressing the prevalence of unresolved galaxy pairs in low-resolution submillimeter surveys.
  • We present 610 MHz and 2.1 GHz imaging of the massive SZE-selected z=0.870 cluster merger ACT-CL J0102-4915 (El Gordo), obtained with the GMRT and the ATCA, respectively. We detect two complexes of radio relics separated by 3.4' (1.6 Mpc) along the system's NW-to-SE collision axis that have high integrated polarizations (33%) and steep spectral indices, consistent with creation via Fermi acceleration by shocks in the ICM. From the spectral index of the relics, we compute a Mach number of 2.5^{+0.7}_{-0.3} and shock speed of 2500^{+400}_{-300} km/s. With our ATCA data, we compute the Faraday depth across the NW relic and find a mean value of 11 rad/m^2 and standard deviation of 6 rad/m^2. With the integrated line-of-sight gas density derived from new Chandra observations, our Faraday depth measurement implies B_parallel~0.01 \mu G in the cluster outskirts. The extremely narrow shock widths in the relics (<23 kpc) prevent us from placing a meaningful constraint on |B| using cooling time arguments. In addition to the relics, we detect a large (1.1 Mpc radius), powerful (log L_1.4[W/Hz]= 25.66+-0.12) radio halo with a Bullet-like morphology. The spectral-index map of the halo shows the synchrotron spectrum is flattest near the relics, along the collision axis, and in regions of high T_gas, all locations associated with recent energy injection. The spatial and spectral correlation between the halo emission and cluster X-ray properties supports primary-electron processes like turbulent reacceleration as the halo production mechanism. The halo's integrated 610 MHz to 2.1 GHz spectral index is 1.2+-0.1, consistent with the cluster's high T_gas in view of previously established global scaling relations. El Gordo is the highest-redshift cluster known to host a radio halo and/or radio relics, and provides new constraints on the non-thermal physics in clusters at z>0.6. [abridged]
  • We combine IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and Herschel PACS and SPIRE measurements to study the dust and gas contents of high-redshift star forming galaxies. We present new observations for a sample of 17 lensed galaxies at z=1.4-3.1, which allow us to directly probe the cold ISM of normal star-forming galaxies with stellar masses of ~10^10Msun, a regime otherwise not (yet) accessible by individual detections in Herschel and molecular gas studies. The lensed galaxies are combined with reference samples of sub-millimeter and normal z~1-2 star-forming galaxies with similar far-infrared photometry to study the gas and dust properties of galaxies in the SFR-M*-redshift parameter space. The mean gas depletion timescale of main sequence galaxies at z>2 is measured to be only ~450Myr, a factor of ~1.5 (~5) shorter than at z=1 (z=0), in agreement with a (1+z)^-1 scaling. The mean gas mass fraction at z=2.8 is 40+/-15% (44% after incompleteness correction), suggesting a flattening or even a reversal of the trend of increasing gas fractions with redshift recently observed up to z~2. The depletion timescale and gas fractions of the z>2 normal star-forming galaxies can be explained under the "equilibrium model" for galaxy evolution, in which the gas reservoir of galaxies is the primary driver of the redshift evolution of specific star formation rates. Due to their high star formation efficiencies and low metallicities, the z>2 lensed galaxies have warm dust despite being located on the star formation main sequence. At fixed metallicity, they also have a gas-to-dust ratio 1.7 times larger than observed locally when using the same standard techniques, suggesting that applying the local calibration of the relation between gas-to-dust ratio and metallicity to infer the molecular gas mass of high redshift galaxies may lead to systematic differences with CO-based estimates.
  • We present a first measurement of the stellar mass component of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, using 3.6 um and 4.5 um photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our sample consists of 14 clusters detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which span the redshift range 0.27 < z < 1.07 (median z = 0.50), and have dynamical mass measurements, accurate to about 30 per cent, with median M500 = 6.9 x 10^{14} MSun. We measure the 3.6 um and 4.5 um galaxy luminosity functions, finding the characteristic magnitude (m*) and faint-end slope (alpha) to be similar to those for IR-selected cluster samples. We perform the first measurements of the scaling of SZ-observables (Y500 and y0) with both brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) stellar mass and total cluster stellar mass (M500star). We find a significant correlation between BCG stellar mass and Y500 (E(z)^{-2/3} DA^2 Y500 ~ M*^{1.2 +/- 0.6}), although we are not able to obtain a strong constraint on the slope of the relation due to the small sample size. Additionally, we obtain E(z)^{-2/3} DA^2 Y500 ~ M500star^{1.0 +/- 0.6} for the scaling with total stellar mass. The mass fraction in stars spans the range 0.006-0.034, with the second ranked cluster in terms of dynamical mass (ACT-CL J0237-4939) having an unusually low total stellar mass and the lowest stellar mass fraction. For the five clusters with gas mass measurements available in the literature, we see no evidence for a shortfall of baryons relative to the cosmic mean value.
  • We relate transitions in galaxy structure and gas content to refueling, here defined to include both the external gas accretion and the internal gas processing needed to renew reservoirs for star formation. We analyze two z=0 data sets: a high-quality ~200-galaxy sample (the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey, data release herein) and a volume-limited ~3000-galaxy sample with reprocessed archival data. Both reach down to baryonic masses ~10^9Msun and span void-to-cluster environments. Two mass-dependent transitions are evident: (i) below the "gas-richness threshold" scale (V~125km/s), gas-dominated quasi-bulgeless Sd--Im galaxies become numerically dominant, while (ii) above the "bimodality" scale (V~200km/s), gas-starved E/S0s become the norm. Notwithstanding these transitions, galaxy mass (or V as its proxy) is a poor predictor of gas-to-stellar mass ratio M_gas/M_*. Instead, M_gas/M_* correlates well with the ratio of a galaxy's stellar mass formed in the last Gyr to its preexisting stellar mass, such that the two ratios have numerically similar values. This striking correspondence between past-averaged star formation and current gas richness implies routine refueling of star-forming galaxies on Gyr timescales. We argue that this refueling underlies the tight M_gas/M_* vs. color correlations often used to measure "photometric gas fractions." Furthermore, the threshold and bimodality scale transitions reflect mass-dependent demographic shifts between three refueling regimes --- accretion dominated, processing dominated, and quenched. In this picture, gas-dominated dwarfs are explained not by inefficient star formation but by overwhelming gas accretion, which fuels stellar mass doubling in <~1Gyr. Moreover, moderately gas-rich bulged disks such as the Milky Way are transitional, becoming abundant only in the narrow range between the threshold and bimodality scales.
  • We present F110W (~J) and F160W (~H) observations of ten submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) NICMOS camera. Our targets have optical redshifts in the range 2.20<z<2.81 confirmed by millimeter CO or mid-IR spectroscopy, guaranteeing that the two bands sample the rest-frame optical with the Balmer break falling between them. Eight of ten are detected in both bands, while two are detected in F160W only. We study their F160W morphologies, applying a maximum-deblending detection algorithm to distinguish multiple- from single-component configurations, leading to reassessments for several objects. Based on our NICMOS imaging and/or previous dynamical evidence we identify five SMGs as multiple sources, which we interpret as merging systems. Additionally, we calculate morphological parameters asymmetry (A) and Gini coefficient (G); thanks to our sample's limited redshift range we recover the trend that multiple-component, merger-like morphologies are reflected in higher asymmetries. We analyze the stellar populations of nine objects with F110W/F160W photometry, using archival HST optical data when available. For multiple systems, we are able to model the individual components that build up an SMG. With the available data we cannot discriminate among star formation histories, but we constrain stellar masses and mass ratios for merger-like SMG systems, obtaining a mean log(M_*/M_sun)=10.9+/-0.2 for our full sample, with individual values log(M_*/M_sun)~9.6-11.8. The morphologies and mass ratios of the least and most massive systems match the predictions of the major-merger and cold accretion SMG formation scenarios, respectively, suggesting that both channels may have a role in the population's origin.
  • We present the first dynamical mass estimates and scaling relations for a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) selected galaxy clusters. The sample consists of 16 massive clusters detected with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) over a 455 sq. deg. area of the southern sky. Deep multi-object spectroscopic observations were taken to secure intermediate-resolution (R~700-800) spectra and redshifts for ~60 member galaxies on average per cluster. The dynamical masses M_200c of the clusters have been calculated using simulation-based scaling relations between velocity dispersion and mass. The sample has a median redshift z=0.50 and a median mass M_200c~12e14 Msun/h70 with a lower limit M_200c~6e14 Msun/h70, consistent with the expectations for the ACT southern sky survey. These masses are compared to the ACT SZE properties of the sample, specifically, the match-filtered central SZE amplitude y, the central Compton parameter y0, and the integrated Compton signal Y_200c, which we use to derive SZE-Mass scaling relations. All SZE estimators correlate with dynamical mass with low intrinsic scatter (<~20%), in agreement with numerical simulations. We explore the effects of various systematic effects on these scaling relations, including the correlation between observables and the influence of dynamically disturbed clusters. Using the 3-dimensional information available, we divide the sample into relaxed and disturbed clusters and find that ~50% of the clusters are disturbed. There are hints that disturbed systems might bias the scaling relations but given the current sample sizes these differences are not significant; further studies including more clusters are required to assess the impact of these clusters on the scaling relations.
  • To assess how external factors such as local interactions and fresh gas accretion influence the global ISM of galaxies, we analyze the relationship between recent enhancements of central star formation and total molecular-to-atomic (H2/HI) gas ratios, using a broad sample of field galaxies spanning early-to-late type morphologies, stellar masses of 10^(7.2-11.2) Msun, and diverse stages of evolution. We find that galaxies occupy several loci in a "fueling diagram" that plots H2/HI vs. mass-corrected blue-centeredness, a metric tracing the degree to which galaxies have bluer centers than the average galaxy at their stellar mass. Spiral galaxies show a positive correlation between H2/HI and mass-corrected blue-centeredness. When combined with previous results linking mass-corrected blue-centeredness to external perturbations, this correlation suggests a link between local galaxy interactions and molecular gas inflow/replenishment. Intriguingly, E/S0 galaxies show a more complex picture: some follow the same correlation, some are quenched, and a distinct population of blue-sequence E/S0 galaxies (with masses below key transitions in gas richness) defines a separate loop in the fueling diagram. This population appears to be composed of low-mass merger remnants currently in late- or post-starburst states, in which the burst first consumes the H2 while the galaxy center keeps getting bluer, then exhausts the H2, at which point the burst population reddens as it ages. Multiple lines of evidence suggest connected evolutionary sequences in the fueling diagram. In particular, tracking total gas-to-stellar mass ratios within the diagram provides evidence of fresh gas accretion onto low-mass E/S0s emerging from central starbursts. Drawing on a comprehensive literature search, we suggest that virtually all galaxies follow the same evolutionary patterns found in our broad sample.
  • We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L$_{8-1000 \mu m} > 10^{12}$ L$_\odot$) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km s$^{-1}$ in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the FIR-strong and FIR-weak quasars, respectively). We attribute this result to absorption of polarized continuum emission from these sources by foreground HI clouds. About 60% of the quasars displaying polarized spectra are radio-loud, far higher than the $\sim$10% observed in the general AGN population. This discrepancy suggests that radio jets play an important role in shaping the environments in these galaxies. These systems may represent a transition phase in the evolution of gas-rich mergers into "mature" radio galaxies.
  • We present an X-ray stacking analysis of a sample of 38 submillimeter galaxies with <z>=2.6 discovered at >4{\sigma} significance in the Lockman Hole North with the MAMBO array. We find a 5{\sigma} detection in the stacked soft band (0.5-2.0 keV) image, and no significant detection in the hard band (2.0-8 keV). We also perform rest-frame spectral stacking based on spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and find a ~4{\sigma} detection of Fe K{\alpha} emission with an equivalent width of EW>1 keV. The centroid of the Fe K{\alpha} emission lies near 6.7 keV, indicating a possible contribution from highly ionized Fe XXV or Fe XXVI; there is also a slight indication that the line emission is more spatially extended than the X-ray continuum. This is the first X-ray analysis of a complete, flux-limited sample of SMGs with statistically robust radio counterparts.
  • We present a detailed analysis from new multi-wavelength observations of the exceptional galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 "El Gordo," likely the most massive, hottest, most X-ray luminous and brightest Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect cluster known at z>0.6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope collaboration discovered El Gordo as the most significant SZ decrement in a sky survey area of 755 deg^2. Our VLT/FORS2 spectra of 89 member galaxies yield a cluster redshift, z=0.870, and velocity dispersion, s=1321+/-106 km/s. Our Chandra observations reveal a hot and X-ray luminous system with an integrated temperature of Tx=14.5+/-1.0 keV and 0.5-2.0 keV band luminosity of Lx=(2.19+/-0.11)x10^45 h70^-2 erg/s. We obtain several statistically consistent cluster mass estimates; using mass scaling relations with velocity dispersion, X-ray Yx, and integrated SZ, we estimate a cluster mass of M200a=(2.16+/-0.32)x10^15 M_sun/h70. The Chandra and VLT/FORS2 optical data also reveal that El Gordo is undergoing a major merger between components with a mass ratio of approximately 2 to 1. The X-ray data show significant temperature variations from a low of 6.6+/-0.7 keV at the merging low-entropy, high-metallicity, cool core to a high of 22+/-6 keV. We also see a wake in the X-ray surface brightness caused by the passage of one cluster through the other. Archival radio data at 843 MHz reveal diffuse radio emission that, if associated with the cluster, indicates the presence of an intense double radio relic, hosted by the highest redshift cluster yet. El Gordo is possibly a high-redshift analog of the famous Bullet Cluster. Such a massive cluster at this redshift is rare, although consistent with the standard L-CDM cosmology in the lower part of its allowed mass range. Massive, high-redshift mergers like El Gordo are unlikely to be reproduced in the current generation of numerical N-body cosmological simulations.
  • We present follow-up observations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA) of optically-confirmed galaxy clusters found in the equatorial survey region of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT): ACT-CL J0022-0036, ACT-CL J2051+0057, and ACT-CL J2337+0016. ACT-CL J0022-0036 is a newly-discovered, massive (10^15 Msun), high-redshift (z=0.81) cluster revealed by ACT through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Deep, targeted observations with the SZA allow us to probe a broader range of cluster spatial scales, better disentangle cluster decrements from radio point source emission, and derive more robust integrated SZE flux and mass estimates than we can with ACT data alone. For the two clusters we detect with the SZA we compute integrated SZE signal and derive masses from the SZA data only. ACT-CL J2337+0016, also known as Abell 2631, has archival Chandra data that allow an additional X-ray-based mass estimate. Optical richness is also used to estimate cluster masses and shows good agreement with the SZE and X-ray-based estimates. Based on the point sources detected by the SZA in these three cluster fields and an extrapolation to ACT's frequency, we estimate that point sources could be contaminating the SZE decrement at the <= 20% level for some fraction of clusters.
  • We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission in the strongly lensed high-redshift quasars IRAS F10214+4724 (z=2.286), the Cloverleaf (z=2.558), RX J0911+0551 (z=2.796), SMM J04135+10277 (z=2.846), and MG 0751+2716 (z=3.200), using the Expanded Very Large Array and the Green Bank Telescope. We report lensing-corrected CO(1-0) line luminosities of L'(CO) = 0.34-18.4 x 10^10 K km/s pc^2 and total molecular gas masses of M(H2) = 0.27-14.7 x 10^10 Msun for the sources in our sample. Based on CO line ratios relative to previously reported observations in J>=3 rotational transitions and line excitation modeling, we find that the CO(1-0) line strengths in our targets are consistent with single, highly-excited gas components with constant brightness temperature up to mid-J levels. We thus do not find any evidence for luminous extended, low excitation, low surface brightness molecular gas components. These properties are comparable to those found in z>4 quasars with existing CO(1-0) observations. These findings stand in contrast to recent CO(1-0) observations of z~2-4 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), which have lower CO excitation and show evidence for multiple excitation components, including some low-excitation gas. These findings are consistent with the picture that gas-rich quasars and SMGs represent different stages in the early evolution of massive galaxies.
  • We present deep 1.2 mm continuum mapping of a 566 arcmin^2 area within the Lockman Hole North field, previously a target of the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey and extremely deep 20 cm mapping with the Very Large Array, which we have obtained using the Max-Planck millimeter bolometer (MAMBO) array on the IRAM 30 m telescope. After filtering, our full map has an RMS sensitivity ranging from 0.45 to 1.5 mJy/beam, with an average of 0.75 mJy/beam. Using the pixel flux distribution in a map made from our best data, we determine the shape, normalization, and approximate flux density cutoff for 1.2 mm number counts well below our nominal sensitivity and confusion limits. After validating our full dataset through comparison with this map, we successfully detect 41 1.2 mm sources with S/N > 4.0 and S(1.2 mm)\simeq 2-5 mJy. We use the most significant of these detections to directly determine the integral number counts down to 1.8 mJy, which are consistent with the results of the pixel flux distribution analysis. 93% of our 41 individual detections have 20 cm counterparts, 49% have Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron counterparts, and one may have a significant Chandra X-ray counterpart. We resolve \simeq 3% of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 1.2 mm into significant detections, and directly estimate a 0.05 mJy faint-end cutoff for the counts that is consistent with the full intensity of the 1.2 mm CIB. The median redshift of our 17 detections with spectroscopic or robust photometric redshifts is z(median)=2.3, and rises to z(median)=2.9 when we include redshifts estimated from the radio/far-infrared spectral index. By using a nearest neighbor and angular correlation function analysis, we find evidence that our S/N>4.0 detections are clustered at the 95% confidence level.
  • We present optical and X-ray properties for the first confirmed galaxy cluster sample selected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect from 148 GHz maps over 455 square degrees of sky made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. These maps, coupled with multi-band imaging on 4-meter-class optical telescopes, have yielded a sample of 23 galaxy clusters with redshifts between 0.118 and 1.066. Of these 23 clusters, 10 are newly discovered. The selection of this sample is approximately mass limited and essentially independent of redshift. We provide optical positions, images, redshifts and X-ray fluxes and luminosities for the full sample, and X-ray temperatures of an important subset. The mass limit of the full sample is around 8e14 Msun, with a number distribution that peaks around a redshift of 0.4. For the 10 highest significance SZE-selected cluster candidates, all of which are optically confirmed, the mass threshold is 1e15 Msun and the redshift range is 0.167 to 1.066. Archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT provide X-ray luminosities and temperatures that are broadly consistent with this mass threshold. Our optical follow-up procedure also allowed us to assess the purity of the ACT cluster sample. Eighty (one hundred) percent of the 148 GHz candidates with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5.1 (5.7) are confirmed as massive clusters. The reported sample represents one of the largest SZE-selected sample of massive clusters over all redshifts within a cosmologically-significant survey volume, which will enable cosmological studies as well as future studies on the evolution, morphology, and stellar populations in the most massive clusters in the Universe.
  • We present low-resolution, rest-frame ~ 5 - 12 micron Spitzer/IRS spectra of two lensed z ~ 2 UV-bright star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3. Using the magnification boost from lensing, we are able to study the physical properties of these objects in greater detail than is possible for unlensed systems. In both targets, we detect strong PAH emission at 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3 microns, indicating the presence of vigorous star formation. For J1206, we find a steeply rising continuum and significant [S IV] emission, suggesting that a moderately hard radiation field is powering continuum emission from small dust grains. The strength of the [S IV] emission also implies a sub-solar metallicity of ~ 0.5 Z_{Sun}, confirming published rest-frame optical measurements. In J0901, the PAH lines have large rest-frame equivalent widths (> 1 micron) and the continuum rises slowly with wavelength, suggesting that any AGN contribution to L_{IR} is insignificant, in contrast to the implications of optical emission-line diagnostics. Using [O III] line flux as a proxy for AGN strength, we estimate that the AGN in J0901 provides only a small fraction of its mid-infrared continuum flux. By combining the detection of [Ar II] with an upper limit on [Ar III] emission, we infer a metallicity of > 1.3 Z_{Sun}. This work highlights the importance of combining rest-frame optical and mid-IR spectroscopy in order to understand the detailed properties of star-forming galaxies at high redshift.
  • We want to study the mid-infrared properties and the starburst and AGN contributions, of 24um sources at z~2, through analysis of mid-infrared spectra combined with millimeter, radio, and infrared photometry. Mid-infrared spectroscopy allows us to recover accurate redshifts. A complete sample of 16 Spitzer-selected sources (ULIRGs) believed to be starbursts at z~2 ("5.8um-peakers") was selected in the (0.5 sq.deg.) J1064+56 SWIRE Lockman Hole field. These sources have S(24um)>0.5mJy, a stellar emission peak redshifted to 5.8um, and r'(Vega)>23. The entire sample was observed with the low resolution units of the Spitzer/IRS infrared spectrograph. These sources have 1.2mm observations with IRAM 30m/MAMBO and very deep 20cm observations from the VLA. Nine of our sources also benefit from 350um observation and detection from CSO/SHARC-II. The entire sample shows good quality IRS spectra dominated by strong PAH features. The main PAH features at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3um have high S/N average luminosities of 2.90, 10.38, 3.62, and 2.29x10^{10}Lsun, respectively. We derived accurate redshifts spanning from 1.75 to 2.28. The average of these redshifts is 2.017. This result confirms that the selection criteria of "5.8um-peakers" associated with a strong detection at 24um are reliable to select sources at z~2. We have analyzed the different correlations between PAH emission and infrared, millimeter, and radio emission. Practically all our sources are strongly dominated by starburst emission. We have also defined two subsamples based on the equivalent width at 7.7um to investigate AGN contributions. Our sample contains strong starbursts and represents a particularly 24um-bright class of SMGs. The very good correlation between PAH and far-IR luminosities is now confirmed in high-z starburst ULIRGs. These sources show a small AGN contribution to the mid-IR, around ~20% in most cases.
  • We present a detailed comparison of the CO(3-2) emitting molecular gas between a local sample of luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) and a high redshift sample that comprises submm selected galaxies (SMGs), quasars, and Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). The U/LIRG sample consists of our recent CO(3-2) survey using the Submillimeter Array while the CO(3-2) data for the high redshift population are obtained from the literature. We find that the L(CO(3-2)) and L(FIR) relation is correlated over five orders of magnitude, which suggests that the molecular gas traced in CO(3-2) emission is a robust tracer of dusty star formation activity. The near unity slope of 0.93 +/- 0.03 obtained from a fit to this relation suggests that the star formation efficiency is constant to within a factor of two across different types of galaxies residing in vastly different epochs. The CO(3-2) size measurements suggest that the molecular gas disks in local U/LIRGs (0.3 - 3.1 kpc) are much more compact than the SMGs (3 - 16 kpc), and that the size scales of SMGs are comparable to the nuclear separation (5 - 40 kpc) of the widely separated nuclei of U/LIRGs in our sample. We argue from these results that the SMGs studied here are predominantly intermediate stage mergers, and that the wider line-widths arise from the violent merger of two massive gas-rich galaxies taking place deep in a massive halo potential.
  • We present new data obtained with the Submillimeter Array for a sample of fourteen nearby luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The galaxies were selected to have luminosity distances D < 200 Mpc and far-infrared luminosities log(L_FIR) > 11.4. The galaxies were observed with spatial resolutions of order 1 kpc in the CO J=3-2, CO J=2-1, 13CO J=2-1, and HCO+ J=4-3 lines as well as the continuum at 880 microns and 1.3 mm. We have combined our CO and continuum data to measure an average gas-to-dust mass ratio of 120 +/- 28 (rms deviation 109) in the central regions of these galaxies, very similar to the value of 150 determined for the Milky Way. This similarity is interesting given the more intense heating from the starburst and possibly accretion activity in the luminous infrared galaxies compared to the Milky Way. We find that the peak H_2 surface density correlates with the far-infrared luminosity, which suggests that galaxies with higher gas surface densities inside the central kiloparsec have a higher star formation rate. The lack of a significant correlation between total H_2 mass and far-infrared luminosity in our sample suggests that the increased star formation rate is due to the increased availability of molecular gas as fuel for star formation in the central regions. In contrast to previous analyses by other authors, we do not find a significant correlation between central gas surface density and the star formation efficiency, as trace by the ratio of far-infrared luminosity to nuclear gas mass. Our data show that it is the star formation rate, not the star formation efficiency, that increases with increasing central gas surface density in these galaxies.
  • Luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) dominate the star formation rate budget of the universe at z > 1, yet no local measurements of their heavy element abundances exist. We measure nuclear or near-nuclear oxygen abundances in a sample of 100 star-forming LIRGs and ULIRGs using new, previously published, and archival spectroscopy of strong emission lines (including [O II] 3727, 3729 A) in galaxies with redshifts <z> ~ 0.1. When compared to local emission-line galaxies of similar luminosity and mass (using the near-infrared luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity relations), we find that LIRGs and ULIRGs are under-abundant by a factor of two on average. As a corollary, LIRGs and ULIRGs also have smaller effective yields. We conclude that the observed under-abundance results from the combination of a decrease of abundance with increasing radius in the progenitor galaxies and strong, interaction- or merger-induced gas inflow into the galaxy nucleus. This conclusion demonstrates that local abundance scaling relations are not universal, a fact that must be accounted for when interpreting abundances earlier in the universe's history when merger-induced star formation was the dominant mode. We use our local sample to compare to high-redshift samples and assess abundance evolution in LIRGs and ULIRGs. We find that abundances in these systems increased by ~0.2 dex from z ~ 0.6 to z ~ 0.1. Evolution from z ~ 2 submillimeter galaxies to z ~ 0.1 ULIRGs also appears to be present, though uncertainty due to spectroscopic limitations is large.