• We present a new empirical \(JHK\) absolute calibration of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We use published data from the extensive \emph{Near-Infrared Synoptic Survey} containing 3.5 million stars, of which 65,000 are red giants that fall within one magnitude of the TRGB. Adopting the TRGB slopes from a companion study of the isolated dwarf galaxy IC\,1613 as well as an LMC distance modulus of \(\mu_0 = \)~18.49~mag from (geometric) detached eclipsing binaries, we derive absolute \(JHK\) zero-points for the near-infrared TRGB. For comparison with measurements in the bar alone, we apply the calibrated \(JHK\) TRGB to a 500 deg\textsuperscript{2} area of the 2MASS survey. The TRGB reveals the 3-dimensional structure of the LMC with a tilt in the direction perpendicular to the major axis of the bar, in agreement with previous studies.
  • Based on observations from the \emph{FourStar} near-infrared camera on the 6.5m Baade-Magellan telescope at Las Campanas, Chile, we present calibrations of the $JHK$ luminosities of stars defining the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the halo of the Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613. We employ metallicity-independent (rectified) T-band magnitudes---constructed using $J,H$ and $K$-band magnitudes and both $(J-H)~ \& ~(J-K)$ colors in order to flatten the upward-sloping red giant branch tips as otherwise seen in their apparent color-magnitude diagrams. We describe and quantify the advantages of working at these particular near-infrared wavelengths, which are applicable to both \emph{HST} and \emph{JWST}. We also note that these same wavelengths can be accessed from the ground for an eventual tie-in to \emph{Gaia} for absolute astrometry and parallaxes to calibrate the intrinsic luminosity of the TRGB. Adopting the color terms derived from the IC 1613 data, as well as the zero-points from a companion study of the Large Magellanic Cloud whose distance is anchored to the geometric distances of detached eclipsing binaries, we find a true distance modulus of 24.32 $\pm$ 0.02~ (statistical) $\pm$ 0.06~mag (systematic) for IC 1613, which compares favorably with the recently published multi-wavelength, multi-method consensus modulus of 24.30 $\pm$ 0.05~mag by Hatt et al. (2017).
  • IC 1613 is an isolated dwarf galaxy within the Local Group. Low foreground and internal extinction, low metallicity, and low crowding make it an invaluable testbed for the calibration of the local distance ladder. We present new, high-fidelity distance estimates to IC 1613 via its Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) and its RR Lyrae (RRL) variables as part of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program, which seeks an alternate local route to \ho using Population II stars. We have measured a TRGB magnitude I=20.35+/-0.01 (statistical)+/-0.01 (systematic) using wide-field observations obtained from the IMACS camera on the Magellan-Baade telescope. We have further constructed optical and near-infrared RRL light curves using archival BI- and new H- band observations from the ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In advance of future Gaia data releases, we set provisional values for the TRGB luminosity via the Large Magellanic Cloud and Galactic RRL zero-points via HST parallaxes. We find corresponding true distance moduli \mu(TRGB)=24.30+/-0.03 (statistical)+/-0.05 (systematic) and \mu(RRL)=24.28+/-0.04 (statistical+systematic). We compare our results to a body of recent publications on IC 1613 and find no statistically significant difference between the distances derived from stars of Population I and II.
  • We present new theoretical period-luminosity-metallicity (PLZ) relations for RR Lyrae stars (RRL) at Spitzer and WISE wavelengths. The PLZ relations were derived using nonlinear, time-dependent convective hydrodynamical models for a broad range in metal abundances (Z=0.0001 to 0.0198). In deriving the light curves, we tested two sets of atmospheric models (Brott & Hauschildt 2005, Castelli & Kurucz 2003) and found no significant difference between the resulting mean magnitudes. We also compare our theoretical relations to empirical relations derived from RRL in both the field and in the globular cluster M4. Our theoretical PLZ relations were combined with multi-wavelength observations to simultaneously fit the distance modulus, mu_0, and extinction, Av, of both the individual Galactic RRL and of the cluster M4. The results for the Galactic RRL are consistent with trigonometric parallax measurements from Gaia's first data release. For M4, we find a distance modulus of $\mu_0=11.257 \pm 0.035$ mag with $A_V = 1.45 \pm 0.12$ mag, which is consistent with measurements from other distance indicators. This analysis has shown that when considering a sample covering a range of iron abundances, the metallicity spread introduces a dispersion in the PL relation on the order of 0.13 mag. However, if this metallicity component is accounted for in a PLZ relation, the dispersion is reduced to ~0.02 mag at MIR wavelengths.
  • The Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program seeks to anchor the distance scale of Type Ia supernovae via the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB). Based on deep $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$ ACS/WFC imaging, we present an analysis of the TRGB for the metal-poor halo of NGC 1365, a giant spiral galaxy in the Fornax Cluster that is host to the supernova SN2012fr. We have measured its extinction-corrected TRGB magnitude to be F814W $= 27.34 \pm 0.03_{stat} \pm0.01_{sys}$ mag. In advance of future direct calibration by $Gaia$, we set a provisional TRGB luminosity via the Large Magellanic Cloud and find a true distance modulus $\mu_0 = 31.29 \pm 0.04_{stat}\pm0.05_{sys}$ mag or $D = 18.1 \pm 0.3_{stat} \pm0.4_{sys}$ Mpc. This high-fidelity measurement shows excellent agreement with recent Cepheid-based distances to NGC 1365 and suggests no significant difference in the distances derived from stars of Population I and II. We revisit the error budget for the $CCHP$ path to the Hubble Constant based on this analysis of one of our most distant hosts, finding a 2.5% measurement is feasible with our current sample.
  • We present a multi-wavelength compilation of new and previously-published photometry for 55 Galactic field RR Lyrae variables. Individual studies, spanning a time baseline of up to 30 years, are self-consistently phased to produce light curves in 10 photometric bands covering the wavelength range from 0.4 to 4.5 microns. Data smoothing via the GLOESS technique is described and applied to generate high-fidelity light curves, from which mean magnitudes, amplitudes, rise-times, and times of minimum and maximum light are derived. 60,000 observations were acquired using the new robotic Three-hundred MilliMeter Telescope (TMMT), which was first deployed at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, CA, and is now permanently installed and operating at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. We provide a full description of the TMMT hardware, software, and data reduction pipeline. Archival photometry contributed approximately 31,000 observations. Photometric data are given in the standard Johnson UBV, Kron-Cousins RI, 2MASS JHK, and Spitzer [3.6] & [4.5] bandpasses.
  • We present an overview of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program, an ongoing program to obtain a 3 per cent measurement of the Hubble constant using alternative methods to the traditional Cepheid distance scale. We aim to establish a completely independent route to the Hubble constant using RR Lyrae variables, the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This alternative distance ladder can be applied to galaxies of any Hubble Type, of any inclination, and, utilizing old stars in low density environments, is robust to the degenerate effects of metallicity and interstellar extinction. Given the relatively small number of SNe Ia host galaxies with independently measured distances, these properties provide a great systematic advantage in the measurement of the Hubble constant via the distance ladder. Initially, the accuracy of our value of the Hubble constant will be set by the five Galactic RR Lyrae calibrators with Hubble Space Telescope Fine-Guidance Sensor parallaxes. With Gaia, both the RR Lyrae zero point and TRGB method will be independently calibrated, the former with at least an order of magnitude more calibrators and the latter directly through parallax measurement of tip red giants. As the first end-to-end "distance ladder" completely independent of both Cepheid variables and the Large Magellanic Cloud, this path to the Hubble constant will allow for the high precision comparison at each rung of the traditional distance ladder that is necessary to understand tensions between this and other routes to the Hubble constant.
  • SPIRITS---SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey---is an ongoing survey of nearby galaxies searching for infrared (IR) transients with Spitzer/IRAC. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of one of our most luminous ($M_{[4.5]} = -17.1\pm0.4$ mag, Vega) and red ($[3.6] - [4.5] = 3.0 \pm 0.2$ mag) transients, SPIRITS 15c. The transient was detected in a dusty spiral arm of IC 2163 ($D\approx35.5$ Mpc). Pre-discovery ground-based imaging revealed an associated, shorter-duration transient in the optical and near-IR (NIR). NIR spectroscopy showed a broad ($\approx 8400$ km s$^{-1}$), double-peaked emission line of He I at $1.083 \mu$m, indicating an explosive origin. The NIR spectrum of SPIRITS 15c is similar to that of the Type IIb SN 2011dh at a phase of $\approx 200$ days. Assuming $A_V = 2.2$ mag of extinction in SPIRITS 15c provides a good match between their optical light curves. The IR light curves and the extreme $[3.6]-[4.5]$ color cannot be explained using only a standard extinction law. Another luminous ($M_{4.5} = -16.1\pm0.4$ mag) event, SPIRITS 14buu, was serendipitously discovered in the same galaxy. The source displays an optical plateau lasting $\gtrsim 80$ days, and we suggest a scenario similar to the low-luminosity Type IIP SN 2005cs obscured by $A_V \approx 1.5$ mag. Other classes of IR-luminous transients can likely be ruled out in both cases. If both events are indeed SNe, this may suggest $\gtrsim 18\%$ of nearby core-collapse SNe are missed by currently operating optical surveys.
  • We present multi-epoch mid-infrared (IR) photometry and the optical discovery observations of the "impostor" supernova (SN) 2010da in NGC 300 using new and archival Spitzer Space Telescope images and ground-based observatories. The mid-IR counterpart of SN 2010da was detected as SPIRITS 14bme in the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transient Survey (SPIRITS), an ongoing systematic search for IR transients. A sharp increase in the 3.6 $\mu$m flux followed by a rapid decrease measured ~150 d before and ~80 d after the initial outburst, respectively, reveal a mid-IR counterpart to the coincident optical and high luminosity X-ray outbursts. At late times after the outburst (~2000 d), the 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m emission increased to over a factor of 2 times the progenitor flux. We attribute the re-brightening mid-IR emission to continued dust production and increasing luminosity of the surviving system associated with SN 2010da. We analyze the evolution of the dust temperature, mass, luminosity, and equilibrium temperature radius in order to resolve the nature of SN 2010da. We address the leading interpretation of SN 2010da as an eruption from a luminous blue variable (LBV) high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) system. We propose that SN 2010da is instead a supergiant (sg)B[e]-HMXB based on similar luminosities and dust masses exhibited by two other known sgB[e]-HMXB systems. Additionally, the SN 2010da progenitor occupies a similar region on a mid-IR color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with known sgB[e] stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The lower limit estimated for the orbital eccentricity of the sgB[e]-HMXB (e>0.82) from X-ray luminosity measurements is high compared to known sgHMXBs and supports the claim that SN 2010da may be associated with a newly formed HMXB system.
  • We compare mid-infrared 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m Warm Spitzer observations for Cepheids in the Milky Way and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using models, we explore in detail the effect of the CO rotation-vibration band-head at 4.6 $\mu$m on the mid-infrared photometry. We confirm the temperature sensitivity of the CO band-head at 4.6 $\mu$m and find no evidence for an effect at 3.6 $\mu$m. We compare the ([3.6]-[4.5]) period-colour relations in the MW, LMC, and SMC. The slopes of the period-colour relations for the three galaxies are in good agreement, but there is a trend in zero-point with metallicity, with the lowest metallicity Cepheids having redder mid-IR colours. Finally, we present a colour-[Fe/H] relation based on published spectroscopic metallicities. This empirical relation, calibrated to the metallicity system of Genovali et al. (2014), demonstrates that the ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour provides a reliable metallicity indicator for Cepheids, with a precision comparable to current spectroscopic determinations.
  • We present a revised distance to the nearby galaxy NGC6822 using a new multi-band fit to both previously published and new optical, near- and mid-infrared data for Cepheid variables. The new data presented in this study include multi-epoch observations obtained in 3.6\um and 4.5\um with the \emph{Spitzer Space Telescope} taken for the Carnegie Hubble Program. We also present new observations in J, H and \kswith FourStar on the Magellan Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We determine mean magnitudes and present new period-luminosity relations in V, I, J, H, \ks, IRAC 3.6\um and 4.5\um. In addition to using the multi-band distance moduli to calculate extinction and a true distance, we present a new method for determining an extinction-corrected distance modulus from multi-band data with varying sample sizes. We combine the distance moduli and extinction for individual stars to determine $E(B-V)=0.35\pm0.04$ and a true distance modulus $\mu_{o}=23.38\pm0.02_{stat}\pm0.04_{sys}$.
  • We present a deep near-infrared image of the newly discovered brown dwarf WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (W0855) using the FourStar imager at Las Campanas Observatory. Our detection of J3=24.8+0.33 -0.53 (J_MKO=25.0+0.33-0.53) at 2.6sigma -- or equivalently an upper limit of J3 > 23.8 (J_MKO > 24.0) at 5sigma makes W0855 the reddest brown dwarf ever categorized (J_MKO - W2 = 10.984+0.33 - 0.53 at 2.6sigma -- or equivalently an upper limit of J_MKO - W2 > 9.984 at 5sigma) and refines its position on color magnitude diagrams. Comparing the new photometry with chemical equilibrium model atmosphere predictions, we demonstrate that W0855 is 4.5sigma from models using a cloudless atmosphere and well reproduced by partly cloudy models (50%) containing sulfide and water ice clouds. Non-equilibrium chemistry or non-solar metallicity may change predictions, however using currently available model approaches, this is the first candidate outside our own solar system to have direct evidence for water clouds.
  • Our understanding of the redshift $z>3$ galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular "dropout" technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) Survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at $z=3-4$. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M $>10.6$, reaching below $M^{\star}$ at $z=3-4$. On average, the massive $z=3-4$ galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median $R_{tot}^{AB}=27.48\pm0.41$ (restframe $M_{1700}=-18.05\pm0.37$). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about $\sim100\times$ fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red ($R-Ks_{AB}=3.9\pm0.2$; restframe UV-slope $\beta=-0.2\pm0.3$) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy SEDs by their restframe $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors and find a diverse population: $46^{+6+10}_{-6-17}$% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, $54^{+8+17}_{-8-10}$% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only $14^{+3+10}_{-3-4}$% resemble luminous blue star forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore,we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with $4\times$ lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at $z>3$. With $5\times$ higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.
  • Using observations from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), we obtain the deepest measurements to date of the galaxy stellar mass function at 0.5 < z < 2.5. ZFOURGE provides well-constrained photometric redshifts made possible through deep medium-bandwidth imaging at 1-2um . We combine this with HST imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), allowing for the efficient selection of both blue and red galaxies down to stellar masses ~10^9.5 Msol at z ~ 2.5. The total surveyed area is 316 arcmin^2 distributed over three independent fields. We supplement these data with the wider and shallower NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) to provide stronger constraints at high masses. Several studies at z<=1 have revealed a steepening of the slope at the low-mass end of the stellar mass function (SMF), leading to an upturn at masses <10^10 Msol that is not well-described by a standard single-Schechter function. We find evidence that this feature extends to at least z ~ 2, and that it can be found in both the star-forming and quiescent populations individually. The characteristic mass (M*) and slope at the lowest masses (alpha) of a double-Schechter function fit to the SMF stay roughly constant at Log(M/Msol) ~ 10.65 and ~-1.5 respectively. The SMF of star-forming galaxies has evolved primarily in normalization, while the change in shape is relatively minor. This is not the case for quiescent galaxies: the depth of our imaging allows us to show for the first time significantly more evolution at Log(M/Msol) < 10.5 than at higher masses. We find that the total mass density (down to 10^9 Msol) in star-forming galaxies has increased by a factor of ~2.2 since z ~ 2.5, whereas in quiescent galaxies it has increased by a factor of ~12 .
  • We have observed the dwarf galaxy IC 1613, at multiple epochs in the mid--infrared using Spitzer and contemporaneously in the near--infrared using the new FourStar near-IR camera on Magellan. We have constructed Cepheid period--luminosity relations in the J, H, K_s, [3.6] and [4.5] bands and have used the run of their apparent distance moduli as a function of wavelength to derive the line--of--sight reddening and distance to IC1613. Using a nine--band fit, we find E(B-V) = 0.05 +- 0.01 mag and an extinction--corrected distance modulus of mu_{0} = 24.29 +- 0.03_{statistical} +- 0.03_{systematic} mag. By comparing our multi--band and [3.6] distance moduli to results from the tip of the red giant branch and red clump distance indicators, we find that metallicity has no measurable effect on Cepheid distances at 3.6 microns in the metallicity range -1.0 < [Fe/H] < 0.2, hence derivations of the Hubble constant at this wavelength require no correction for metallicity.
  • We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z=0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of 4.6e9 M_Sun and a stellar population age of 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z=0.718 with a stellar mass of 1.4e9 M_Sun, a star formation rate of 16 M_Sun yr^-1, and a stellar population age of 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i>26 mag and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. The bursts have inferred circumburst densities of ~1e-4-1 cm^-3, and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of 1e50-1e51 erg. These events highlight the diversity of galaxies that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment (~1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to May 2012) and classify them as follows: late-type (50%), early-type (15%), inconclusive (20%), and host-less (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of >26 mag; 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments, and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. The most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions are ~60-80% and ~20-40%, respectively. We find no clear trend between gamma-ray duration and host type, and no change to the fractions when excluding events recently claimed as possible contaminants from the long GRB/collapsar population. Our reported demographics are consistent with a short GRB rate driven by both stellar mass and star formation.
  • We present the discovery and a detailed multi-wavelength study of a strongly-lensed luminous infrared galaxy at z=0.816. Unlike most known lensed galaxies discovered at optical or near-infrared wavelengths this lensed source is red, r-Ks = 3.9 [AB], which the data presented here demonstrate is due to ongoing dusty star formation. The overall lensing magnification (a factor of 17) facilitates observations from the blue optical through to 500micron, fully capturing both the stellar photospheric emission as well as the re-processed thermal dust emission. We also present optical and near-IR spectroscopy. These extensive data show that this lensed galaxy is in many ways typical of IR-detected sources at z~1, with both a total luminosity and size in accordance with other (albeit much less detailed) measurements in samples of galaxies observed in deep fields with the Spitzer telescope. Its far-infrared spectral energy distribution is well-fit by local templates that are an order of magnitude less luminous than the lensed galaxy; local templates of comparable luminosity are too hot to fit. Its size (D~7kpc) is much larger than local luminous infrared galaxies, but in line with sizes observed for such galaxies at z~1. The star formation appears uniform across this spatial scale. In this source, the luminosity of which is typical of sources that dominate the cosmic infrared background, we find that star formation is spatially extended and well organised, quite unlike the compact merger-driven starbursts which are typical for sources of this luminosity at z~0.
  • The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to calibrate the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The ultimate goal of the CHP is a systematic improvement in the distance scale leading to a determination of the Hubble Constant to within an accuracy of 2%. This paper focuses on the measurement and calibration of the Galactic Cepheid Period-Luminosity (Leavitt) Relation using the warm Spitzer IRAC 1 and 2 bands at 3.6 and 4.5 \mu m. We present photometric measurements covering the period range 4 - 70 days for 37 Galactic Cepheids. Data at 24 phase points were collected for each star. Three PL relations of the form M=a(Log(P)-1)+b are derived. The method adopted here takes the slope a to be -3.31, as determined from the Spitzer LMC data of Scowcroft et al. (2012). Using the geometric HST guide-star distances to ten Galactic Cepheids we find a calibrated 3.6 micron PL zero-point of -5.80\pm0.03. Together with our value for the LMC zero-point we determine a reddening-corrected distance modulus of 18.48\pm0.04 mag to the LMC. The mid-IR Period-Color diagram and the [3.6] - [4.5] color variation with phase are interpreted in terms of CO absorption at 4.5 \mu m. This situation compromises the use of the 4.5 \mu m data for distance determinations.
  • The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to improve the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of Spitzer. The ultimate goal is a determination of the Hubble constant to an accuracy of 2%. This paper is the first in a series on the Cepheid population of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and focusses on the period-luminosity relations (Leavitt laws) that will be used, in conjunction with observations of Milky Way Cepheids, to set the slope and zero--point of the Cepheid distance scale in the mid-infrared. To this end, we have obtained uniformly-sampled light curves for 85 LMC Cepheids, having periods between 6 and 140 days. Period-luminosity and period-color relations are presented in the 3.6 \mu m and 4.5\mu m bands. We demonstrate that the 3.6 \mu m band is a superb distance indicator. The cyclical variation of the [3.6]-[4.5] color has been measured for the first time. We attribute the amplitude and phase of the color curves to the dissociation and recombination of CO molecules in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The CO affects only the 4.5 \mu m flux making it a potential metallicity indicator.