• We set out to compile a catalogue of RRab pulsating variables in the SuperWASP archive and identify candidate Blazhko effect objects within this catalogue. We analysed their light curves and power spectra for correlations in their common characteristics to further our understanding of the phenomenon. Pulsation periods were found for each SWASP RRab object using PDM techniques. Low frequency periodic signals detected in the CLEAN power spectra of RRab stars were matched with modulation sidebands and combined with pairs of sidebands to produce a list of candidate Blazhko periods. A novel technique was used in an attempt to identify Blazhko effect stars by comparing scatter at different parts of the folded light curve. Pulsation amplitudes were calculated based on phase folded light curves. The SuperWASP RRab catalogue consists of 4963 objects of which 3397 are previously unknown. We discovered 983 distinct candidates for Blazhko effect objects, 613 of these being previously unknown in the literature as RR Lyrae stars, and 894 are previously unknown to be Blazhko effect stars. Correlations were investigated between the scatter of points on the light curve, the periods and amplitudes of the objects' pulsations, and those of the Blazhko effect. A statistical analysis has been performed on a large population of Blazhko effect stars from the wide-field SuperWASP survey. No correlations were found between the Blazhko period and other parameters including the Blazhko amplitude, although we confirmed a lower rate of occurrence of the Blazhko effect in long pulsation period objects.
  • We present a comparative study of the thermal emission of the transiting exoplanets WASP-1b and WASP-2b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The two planets have very similar masses but suffer different levels of irradiation and are predicted to fall either side of a sharp transition between planets with and without hot stratospheres. WASP-1b is one of the most highly irradiated planets studied to date. We measure planet/star contrast ratios in all four of the IRAC bands for both planets (3.6-8.0um), and our results indicate the presence of a strong temperature inversion in the atmosphere of WASP-1b, particularly apparent at 8um, and no inversion in WASP-2b. In both cases the measured eclipse depths favor models in which incident energy is not redistributed efficiently from the day side to the night side of the planet. We fit the Spitzer light curves simultaneously with the best available radial velocity curves and transit photometry in order to provide updated measurements of system parameters. We do not find significant eccentricity in the orbit of either planet, suggesting that the inflated radius of WASP-1b is unlikely to be the result of tidal heating. Finally, by plotting ratios of secondary eclipse depths at 8um and 4.5um against irradiation for all available planets, we find evidence for a sharp transition in the emission spectra of hot Jupiters at an irradiation level of 2 x 10^9 erg/s/cm^2. We suggest this transition may be due to the presence of TiO in the upper atmospheres of the most strongly irradiated hot Jupiters.
  • We report on the identification of the optical/IR counterpart of the 29.5-s transient X-ray pulsar GS 1843+009. We re-analysed an archival ROSAT HRI observation of GS 1843+009, obtaining a new refined position. The optical and IR follow-up observations carried out for the new error circle allowed us to find a relatively faint (V=20.9) and variable early type reddened star (V-R=2.1). The optical spectra show the Balmer and Paschen series in emission, while the IR observations confirm the presence of a flux excess (H=13.2, J-H=0.54), suggesting that the star is surrounded by a circumstellar envelope. Spectroscopic and photometric data together indicate a B0-B2 IV-Ve spectral-type star located at a distance of > 10kpc confirming the Be-star/X-ray binary nature of GS 1843+009.