• We use public data from the CMS experiment to study the 2-prong substructure of jets. The CMS Open Data is based on 31.8/pb of 7 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded at the Large Hadron Collider in 2010, yielding a sample of 768,687 events containing a high-quality central jet with transverse momentum larger than 85 GeV. Using CMS's particle flow reconstruction algorithm to obtain jet constituents, we extract the 2-prong substructure of the leading jet using soft drop declustering. We find good agreement between results obtained from the CMS Open Data and those obtained from parton shower generators, and we also compare to analytic jet substructure calculations performed to modified leading-logarithmic accuracy. Although the 2010 CMS Open Data does not include simulated data to help estimate systematic uncertainties, we use track-only observables to validate these substructure studies.
  • The splitting function is a universal property of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) which describes how energy is shared between partons. Despite its ubiquitous appearance in many QCD calculations, the splitting function cannot be measured directly since it always appears multiplied by a collinear singularity factor. Recently, however, a new jet substructure observable was introduced which asymptotes to the splitting function for sufficiently high jet energies. This provides a way to expose the splitting function through jet substructure measurements at the Large Hadron Collider. In this letter, we use public data released by the CMS experiment to study the 2-prong substructure of jets and test the 1 -> 2 splitting function of QCD. To our knowledge, this is the first ever physics analysis based on the CMS Open Data.
  • By measuring the substructure of a jet, one can assign it a "quark" or "gluon" tag. In the eikonal (double-logarithmic) limit, quark/gluon discrimination is determined solely by the color factor of the initiating parton (C_F versus C_A). In this paper, we confront the challenges faced when going beyond this leading-order understanding, using both parton-shower generators and first-principles calculations to assess the impact of higher-order perturbative and nonperturbative physics. Working in the idealized context of electron-positron collisions, where one can define a proxy for quark and gluon jets based on the Lorentz structure of the production vertex, we find a fascinating interplay between perturbative shower effects and nonperturbative hadronization effects. Turning to proton-proton collisions, we highlight a core set of measurements that would constrain current uncertainties in quark/gluon tagging and improve the overall modeling of jets at the Large Hadron Collider.
  • Machine learning techniques are increasingly being applied toward data analyses at the Large Hadron Collider, especially with applications for discrimination of jets with different originating particles. Previous studies of the power of machine learning to jet physics has typically employed image recognition, natural language processing, or other algorithms that have been extensively developed in computer science. While these studies have demonstrated impressive discrimination power, often exceeding that of widely-used observables, they have been formulated in a non-constructive manner and it is not clear what additional information the machines are learning. In this paper, we study machine learning for jet physics constructively, expressing all of the information in a jet onto sets of observables that completely and minimally span N-body phase space. For concreteness, we study the application of machine learning for discrimination of boosted, hadronic decays of Z bosons from jets initiated by QCD processes. Our results demonstrate that the information in a jet that is useful for discrimination power of QCD jets from Z bosons is saturated by only considering observables that are sensitive to 4-body (8 dimensional) phase space.
  • We examine the analogue one-dimensional quantum mechanics problem associated with bulk scalars and fermions in a slice of AdS_5. The ``Schroedinger'' potential can take on different qualitative shapes depending on the values of the mass parameters in the bulk theory. Several interesting correlations between the shape of the Schroedinger potential and the holographic theory exist. We show that the quantum mechanical picture is a useful guide to the holographic theory by examining applications from phenomenology.