• The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be conducting a nearly all-sky photometric survey over two years, with a core mission goal to discover small transiting exoplanets orbiting nearby bright stars. It will obtain 30-minute cadence observations of all objects in the TESS fields of view, along with 2-minute cadence observations of 200,000 to 400,000 selected stars. The choice of which stars to observe at the 2-min cadence is driven by the need to detect small transiting planets, which leads to the selection of primarily bright, cool dwarfs. We describe the catalogs assembled and the algorithms used to populate the TESS Input Catalog (TIC). We also describe a ranking system for prioritizing stars according to the smallest transiting planet detectable, and assemble a Candidate Target List (CTL) using that ranking. We discuss additional factors that affect the ability to photometrically detect and dynamically confirm small planets, and we note additional stellar populations of interest that may be added to the final target list. The TIC is available on the STScI MAST server, and an enhanced CTL is available through the Filtergraph data visualization portal system at the URL https://filtergraph.vanderbilt.edu/tess_ctl .
  • Doppler observations from Keck Observatory have revealed a triple planet system orbiting the nearby mid-type K dwarf, HIP 57274. The inner planet, HIP 57274b, is a super-Earth with \msini\ = 11.6 \mearth (0.036 \mjup), an orbital period of 8.135 $\pm$ 0.004 d, and slightly eccentric orbit $e=0.19 \pm 0.1$. We calculate a transit probability of 6.5% for the inner planet. The second planet has \msini\ = 0.4 \mjup\ with an orbital period of 32.0 $\pm 0.02$ d in a nearly circular orbit, and $e = 0.05 \pm 0.03$. The third planet has \msini\ = 0.53 \mjup\ with an orbital period of 432 $\pm 8$ d (1.18 years) and an eccentricity $e = 0.23 \pm 0.03$. This discovery adds to the number of super Earth mass planets with $\msini < 12 \mearth\ $ that have been detected with Doppler surveys. We find that 56 $\pm 18$% super-Earths are members of multi-planet systems. This is certainly a lower limit because of observational detectability limits, yet significantly higher than the fraction of Jupiter mass exoplanets, $20 \pm 8$%, that are members of Doppler-detected, multi-planet systems.