• Although foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) incidence has decreased in South America over the last years, the pathogen still circulates in the region and the risk of re-emergence in previously FMDV-free areas is a veterinary public health concern. In this paper we merge environmental, epidemiological and genetic data to reconstruct spatiotemporal patterns and determinants of FMDV serotypes A and O dispersal in South America. Our dating analysis suggests that serotype A emerged in South America around 1930, while serotype O emerged around 1990. The rate of evolution for serotype A was significantly higher compared to serotype O. Phylogeographic inference identified two well-connected sub networks of viral flow, one including Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador; another including Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. The spread of serotype A was best described by geographic distances, while trade of live cattle was the predictor that best explained serotype O spread. Our findings show that the two serotypes have different underlying evolutionary and spatial dynamics and may pose different threats to control programmes. Key-words: Phylogeography, foot-and-mouth disease virus, South America, animal trade.
  • Influenza B viruses make a considerable contribution to morbidity attributed to seasonal influenza. Currently circulating influenza B isolates are known to belong to two antigenically distinct lineages referred to as B/Victoria and B/Yamagata. Frequent exchange of genomic segments of these two lineages has been noted in the past, but the observed patterns of reassortment have not been formalized in detail. We investigate inter-lineage reassortments by comparing phylogenetic trees across genomic segments. Our analyses indicate that of the 8 segments of influenza B viruses only PB1, PB2 and HA segments maintained separate Victoria and Yamagata lineages and that currently circulating strains possess PB1, PB2 and HA segments derived entirely from one or the other lineage; other segments have repeatedly reassorted between lineages thereby reducing genetic diversity. We argue that this difference between segments is due to selection against reassortant viruses with mixed lineage PB1, PB2 and HA segments. Given sufficient time and continued recruitment to the reassortment-isolated PB1-PB2-HA gene complex, we expect influenza B viruses to eventually undergo sympatric speciation.
  • The reconstruction of transmission trees for epidemics from genetic data has been the subject of some recent interest. It has been demonstrated that the transmission tree structure can be investigated by augmenting internal nodes of a phylogenetic tree constructed using pathogen sequences from the epidemic with information about the host that held the corresponding lineage. In this paper, we note that this augmentation is equivalent to a correspondence between transmission trees and partitions of the phylogenetic tree into connected subtrees each containing one tip, and provide a framework for Markov Chain Monte Carlo inference of phylogenies that are partitioned in this way, giving a new method to co-estimate both trees. The procedure is integrated in the existing phylogenetic inference package BEAST.
  • Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution.
  • Background: Simulated nucleotide or amino acid sequences are frequently used to assess the performance of phylogenetic reconstruction methods. BEAST, a Bayesian statistical framework that focuses on reconstructing time-calibrated molecular evolutionary processes, supports a wide array of evolutionary models, but lacked matching machinery for simulation of character evolution along phylogenies. Results: We present a flexible Monte Carlo simulation tool, called piBUSS, that employs the BEAGLE high performance library for phylogenetic computations within BEAST to rapidly generate large sequence alignments under complex evolutionary models. piBUSS sports a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows combining a rich array of models across an arbitrary number of partitions. A command-line interface mirrors the options available through the GUI and facilitates scripting in large-scale simulation studies. Analogous to BEAST model and analysis setup, more advanced simulation options are supported through an extensible markup language (XML) specification, which in addition to generating sequence output, also allows users to combine simulation and analysis in a single BEAST run. Conclusions: piBUSS offers a unique combination of flexibility and ease-of-use for sequence simulation under realistic evolutionary scenarios. Through different interfaces, piBUSS supports simulation studies ranging from modest endeavors for illustrative purposes to complex and large-scale assessments of evolutionary inference procedures. The software aims at implementing new models and data types that are continuously being developed as part of BEAST/BEAGLE.
  • Molecular phylogenetic and phylogeographic reconstructions generally assume time-homogeneous substitution processes. Motivated by computational convenience, this assumption sacrifices biological realism and offers little opportunity to uncover the temporal dynamics in evolutionary histories. Here, we extend and generalize an evolutionary approach that relaxes the time-homogeneous process assumption by allowing the specification of different infinitesimal substitution rate matrices across different time intervals, called epochs, along the evolutionary history. We focus on an epoch model implementation in a Bayesian inference framework that offers great modeling flexibility in drawing inference about any discrete data type characterized as a continuous-time Markov chain, including phylogeographic traits. To alleviate the computational burden that the additional temporal heterogeneity imposes, we adopt a massively parallel approach that achieves both fine- and coarse-grain parallelization of the computations across branches that accommodate epoch transitions, making extensive use of graphics processing units. Through synthetic examples, we assess model performance in recovering evolutionary parameters from data generated according to different evolutionary scenarios that comprise different numbers of epochs for both nucleotide and codon substitution processes. We illustrate the usefulness of our inference framework in two different applications to empirical data sets: the selection dynamics on within-host HIV populations throughout infection and the seasonality of global influenza circulation. In both cases, our epoch model captures key features of temporal heterogeneity that remained difficult to test using ad hoc procedures.
  • We introduce a system for experimental evolution consisting of populations of short oligonucleotides (Oli populations) evolving in a modified quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). It is tractable at the genetic, genomic, phenotypic and fitness levels. The Oli system uses DNA hairpins designed to form structures that self-prime under defined conditions. Selection acts on the phenotype of self-priming, after which differences in fitness are amplified and quantified using qPCR. We outline the methodological and bioinformatics tools for the Oli system here, and demonstrate that it can be used as a conventional experimental evolution model system by test-driving it in an experiment investigating adaptive evolution under different rates of environmental change.
  • Global mobility flow data are at the heart of spatial epidemiological models used to predict infectious disease behavior but this wealth of data on human mobility has been largely neglected by reconstructions of pathogen evolutionary dynamics using viral genetic data. Although stochastic models of viral evolution may potentially be informed by such data, a major challenge lies in deciding which mobility processes are critical and to what extent they contribute to shaping contemporaneous distributions of pathogen diversity. Here, we develop a framework to integrate predictors of viral diffusion with phylogeographic inference and estimate human influenza H3N2 migration history while simultaneously testing and quantifying the factors that underly it. We provide evidence for air travel governing the global dynamics of human influenza whereas other processes act at a more local scale.
  • Since its emergence in 1968, influenza A (H3N2) has evolved extensively in genotype and antigenic phenotype. Antigenic evolution occurs in the context of a two-dimensional 'antigenic map', while genetic evolution shows a characteristic ladder-like genealogical tree. Here, we use a large-scale individual-based model to show that evolution in a Euclidean antigenic space provides a remarkable correspondence between model behavior and the epidemiological, antigenic, genealogical and geographic patterns observed in influenza virus. We find that evolution away from existing human immunity results in rapid population turnover in the influenza virus and that this population turnover occurs primarily along a single antigenic axis. Thus, selective dynamics induce a canalized evolutionary trajectory, in which the evolutionary fate of the influenza population is surprisingly repeatable and hence, in theory, predictable.