• We analyze the constraints from direct and indirect detection on fermionic Majorana Dark Matter (DM). Because the interaction with the Standard Model (SM) particles is spin-dependent, a priori the constraints that one gets from neutrino telescopes, the LHC, direct and indirect detection experiments are comparable. We study the complementarity of these searches in a particular example, in which a heavy $Z'$ mediates the interactions between the SM and the DM. We find that for heavy dark matter indirect detection provides the strongest bounds on this scenario, while IceCube bounds are typically stronger than those from direct detection. The LHC constraints are dominant for smaller dark matter masses. These light masses are less motivated by thermal relic abundance considerations. We show that the dominant annihilation channels of the light DM in the Sun and the Galactic Center are either $b\bar b$ or $t\bar t$, while the heavy DM annihilation is completely dominated by $Zh$ channel. The latter produces a hard neutrino spectrum which has not been previously analyzed. We study the neutrino spectrum yielded by DM and recast IceCube constraints to allow proper comparison with constraints from direct and indirect detection experiments and LHC exclusions. Note that the original version of the paper contains an important error: the contribution of the $Z$-mediated processes was overlooked. This changes some of the results of the paper. For the details and the correct results please see the erratum attached to this file as an appendix.
  • We propose novel collider searches which can significantly improve the LHC reach to new gauge bosons $Z'$ with mixed anomalies with the electroweak (EW) gauge group. Such a $Z'$ necessarily acquires a Chern-Simons coupling to the EW gauge bosons and these couplings can drive both exotic $Z$ decays into $Z'\gamma$ if the new gauge boson is sufficiently light, as well as $Z'$ decays into EW gauge bosons.While the exotic decay rate of the heavy $Z$ into $Z'\gamma$ is too small to be observed at the LHC, for a light $Z'$, we show the potential of a lepton jet search in association with a photon to probe the rare decay $Z \to Z' \gamma$.
  • We perform an extensive survey of non-standard Higgs decays that are consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance. Our aim is to motivate a large set of new experimental analyses on the existing and forthcoming data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The explicit search for exotic Higgs decays presents a largely untapped discovery opportunity for the LHC collaborations, as such decays may be easily missed by other searches. We emphasize that the Higgs is uniquely sensitive to the potential existence of new weakly coupled particles and provide a unified discussion of a large class of both simplified and complete models that give rise to characteristic patterns of exotic Higgs decays. We assess the status of exotic Higgs decays after LHC Run 1. In many cases we are able to set new nontrivial constraints by reinterpreting existing experimental analyses. We point out that improvements are possible with dedicated analyses and perform some preliminary collider studies. We prioritize the analyses according to their theoretical motivation and their experimental feasibility. This document is accompanied by a website that will be continuously updated with further information: http://exotichiggs.physics.sunysb.edu.
  • We study electroweak scale Dark Matter (DM) whose interactions with baryonic matter are mediated by a heavy anomalous $Z'$. We emphasize that when the DM is a Majorana particle, its low-velocity annihilations are dominated by loop suppressed annihilations into the gauge bosons, rather than by p-wave or chirally suppressed annihilations into the SM fermions. Because the $Z'$ is anomalous, these kinds of DM models can be realized only as effective field theories (EFTs) with a well-defined cutoff, where heavy spectator fermions restore gauge invariance at high energies. We formulate these EFTs, estimate their cutoff and properly take into account the effect of the Chern-Simons terms one obtains after the spectator fermions are integrated out. We find that, while for light DM collider and direct detection experiments usually provide the strongest bounds, the bounds at higher masses are heavily dominated by indirect detection experiments, due to strong annihilation into $W^+W^-$, $ZZ$, $Z\gamma$ and possibly into $gg$ and $\gamma\gamma$. We emphasize that these annihilation channels are generically significant because of the structure of the EFT, and therefore these models are prone to strong indirect detection constraints. Even though we focus on selected $Z'$ models for illustrative purposes, our setup is completely generic and can be used for analyzing the predictions of any anomalous $Z'$-mediated DM model with arbitrary charges.
  • We investigate the general structure of mirror symmetry breaking in the Twin Higgs scenario. We show, using the IR effective theory, that a significant gain in fine tuning can be achieved if the symmetry is broken hardly. We emphasize that weakly coupled UV completions can naturally accommodate this scenario. We analyze SUSY UV completions and present a simple Twin SUSY model with a tuning of around 10% and colored superpartners as heavy as 2 TeV. The collider signatures of general Twin SUSY models are discussed with a focus on the extended Higgs sectors.
  • We propose a novel mechanism for production of baryonic asymmetry in the early Universe. The mechanism takes advantage of the strong first order phase transition that produces runaway bubbles in the hidden sector that propagate almost without friction with ultra-relativistic velocities. Collisions of such bubbles can non-thermally produce heavy particles that further decay out-of-equilibrium into the SM and produce the observed baryonic asymmetry. This process can proceed at the very low temperatures, providing a new mechanism of post-sphaleron baryogenesis. In this paper we present a fully calculable model which produces the baryonic asymmetry along these lines as well as evades all the existing cosmological constraints. We emphasize that the Gravitational Waves signal from the first order phase transition is completely generic and can potentially be detected by the future eLISA interferometer. We also discuss other potential signals, which are more model dependent, and point out the unresolved theoretical questions related to our proposal.
  • Motivated by the tantalizing excesses recently reported in the di-photon invariant mass spectrum at the LHC, we scrutinize some implications of scalar di-photon resonances in high energy proton-proton collisions. In particular, indications of a large width impose several challenges for model building. We show how calculability and unitarity considerations severely limit possible perturbative realizations of such a signal and propose a simple criterion that can be adapted to any renormalizable model. Furthermore, we discuss correlations between a di-photon excess and precision observables, including the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of quarks and leptons, neutral meson oscillations and radiative flavor changing neutral current mediated decays of heavy leptons and hadrons. We find that existing searches and measurements significantly constrain the possibilities for a scalar resonance decaying into final states involving Standard Model fermions. We propose future search strategies which could elucidate some remaining currently unconstrained decay channels and discuss possible correlations between the di-photon excess and several recently reported flavor anomalies, showing that the latter can be addressed in a new incarnation of a gauged $U(1)^\prime$ model, with the di-photon resonance being the physical remnant of the $U(1)^\prime$-breaking field.
  • Precision measurements of the Drell-Yan (DY) cross section at the LHC constrain new physics scenarios that involve new states with electroweak (EW) charges. We analyze these constraints and apply them to models that can address the LHC diphoton excess at 750 GeV. We confront these findings with LEP EW precision tests and show that DY provides stronger constraints than the LEP data. While 8 TeV data can already probe some parts of the interesting region of parameter space, LHC14 results are expected to cover a substantial part of the relevant terrain. We derive the bounds from the existing data, estimate LHC14 reach and compare them to the bounds one gets from LEP and future FCC-ee precision measurements.
  • We identify and analyze thermal dark matter candidates in the fraternal twin Higgs model and its generalizations. The relic abundance of fraternal twin dark matter is set by twin weak interactions, with a scale tightly tied to the weak scale of the Standard Model by naturalness considerations. As such, the dark matter candidates benefit from a "fraternal WIMP miracle," reproducing the observed dark matter abundance for dark matter masses between 50 and 150 GeV. However, the couplings dominantly responsible for dark matter annihilation do not lead to interactions with the visible sector. The direct detection rate is instead set via fermionic Higgs portal interactions, which are likewise constrained by naturalness considerations but parametrically weaker than those leading to dark matter annihilation. The predicted direct detection cross section is close to current LUX bounds and presents an opportunity for the next generation of direct detection experiments.
  • Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator ${\cal O}_{\mu \nu}$ that mixes with the hypercharge field strength and couples to dark matter tensor currents, which has an interesting viable parameter space. We describe the effect of such mediators on the cross sections and recoil energy spectra that could be observed in direct detection.
  • Non-minimal supersymmetric models that predict a tree-level Higgs mass above the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) bound are well motivated by naturalness considerations. Indirect constraints on the stop sector parameters of such models are significantly relaxed compared to the MSSM; in particular, both stops can have weak-scale masses. We revisit the stop-catalyzed electroweak baryogenesis (EWB) scenario in this context. We find that the LHC measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates already rule out the possibility of stop-catalyzed EWB. We also introduce a gauge-invariant analysis framework that may generalize to other scenarios in which interactions outside the gauge sector drive the electroweak phase transition.
  • We examine the `diboson' excess at $\sim 2$ TeV seen by the LHC experiments in various channels. We provide a comparison of the excess significances as a function of the mass of the tentative resonance and give the signal cross sections needed to explain the excesses. We also present a survey of available theoretical explanations of the resonance, classified in three main approaches. Beyond that, we discuss methods to verify the anomaly, determining the major properties of the various surpluses and exploring how different models can be discriminated. Finally, we give a tabular summary of the numerous explanations, presenting their main phenomenological features.
  • April 19, 2015 hep-ph, hep-ex
    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\tau\to 3\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals - scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the Standard Model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation
  • We revisit the Twin Higgs scenario as a "dark" solution to the little hierarchy problem, identify the structure of a minimal model and its viable parameter space, and analyze its collider implications. In this model, dark naturalness generally leads to Hidden Valley phenomenology. The twin particles, including the top partner, are all Standard-Model-neutral, but naturalness favors the existence of twin strong interactions -- an asymptotically-free force that confines not far above the Standard Model QCD scale -- and a Higgs portal interaction. We show that, taken together, these typically give rise to exotic decays of the Higgs to twin hadrons. Across a substantial portion of the parameter space, certain twin hadrons have visible and often displaced decays, providing a potentially striking LHC signature. We briefly discuss appropriate experimental search strategies.
  • We explore naturalness constraints on the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons H^0, H^+/-, and A^0 in supersymmetric theories. We show that, in any extension of MSSM which accommodates the 125 GeV Higgs at the tree level, one can derive an upper bound on the SUSY Higgs masses from naturalness considerations. As is well-known for the MSSM, these bounds become weak at large tan beta. However, we show that measurements of b to s gamma together with naturalness arguments lead to an upper bound on tan beta, strengthening the naturalness case for heavy Higgs states near the TeV scale. The precise bound depends somewhat on the SUSY mediation scale: allowing a factor of 10 tuning in the stop sector, the measured rate of b to s gamma implies tan beta < 30 for running down from 10 TeV but tan beta < 4 for mediation at or above 100 TeV, placing m_A near the TeV scale for natural EWSB. Because the signatures of heavy Higgs bosons at colliders are less susceptible to being "hidden" than standard superpartner signatures, there is a strong motivation to make heavy Higgs searches a key part of the LHC's search for naturalness. In an appendix we comment on how the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem links the rates for H to hh and H to ZZ signatures.
  • We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition generically predict significant deviations of the Higgs couplings to gluons, photons, and Z bosons from their SM values. Precise experimental measurements of the Higgs couplings at the LHC and at the proposed next-generation facilities will allow for a robust test of the phase transition dynamics. To illustrate this point, in this paper we focus on the scenario in which loops of a new scalar field are responsible for the first-order phase transition, and study a selection of benchmark models with various SM gauge quantum numbers of the new scalar. We find that the current LHC measurement of the Higgs coupling to gluons already excludes the possibility of a first-order phase transition induced by a scalar in a sextet, or larger, representation of the SU(3)_c. Future LHC experiments (including HL-LHC) will be able to definitively probe the case when the new scalar is a color triplet. If the new scalar is not colored, an electron-positron Higgs factory, such as the proposed ILC or TLEP, would be required to test the nature of the phase transition. The extremely precise measurement of the Higgsstrahlung cross section possible at such machines will allow for a comprehensive and definitive probe of the possibility of a first-order electroweak phase transition in all models we considered, including the case when the new scalar is a pure gauge singlet.
  • A future 100 TeV pp collider will explore energies much higher than the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. In this paper we study some of the phenomenological consequences of this fact, concentrating on enhanced bremsstrahlung of EW gauge bosons. We survey a handful of possible new physics experimental searches one can pursue at a 100 TeV collider using this phenomenon. The most dramatic effect is the non-negligible radiation of EW gauge bosons from neutrinos, making them partly visible objects. The presence of collinear EW radiation allows for the full reconstruction of neutrinos under certain circumstances. We also show that the presence of EW radiation allows one to distinguish the $SU(2)$ quantum numbers of various new physics particles. We consider examples of two completely different new physics paradigms, additional gauge groups and SUSY, where the bremsstrahlung radiation of $W$ and $Z$ from $W'$s, $Z'$s or stops allows one to determine the couplings and the mixing angles of the new particles (respectively). Finally, we show how the emission of $W$s and $Z$s from high $p_T$ Higgs bosons can be used to test the couplings of new physics to the Higgs boson.
  • We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.
  • Stops with the mass nearly degenerate with the top mass, decaying into tops and soft neutralinos, are usually dubbed "stealth stops". Their kinematics looks very similar to that of the standard tops events, which leads to events with little or no excess of missing transverse energy. This complicates the probing of this region of the stop parameter space by hadron colliders, rendering the application of standard searching techniques challenging. In this Snowmass white paper we reanalyze the spin correlation approach to the search of stealth stops, focusing on the feasibility of this search at the 14 TeV LHC. We find, while the statistical limitations significantly shrink compared to the low-luminosity 8 TeV run, the systematic PDF uncertainties pose the main obstacle. We show that the current understanding of PDFs probably does not allow us to talk about top and stop discrimination via spin correlation in the inclusive sample. On the other hand the systematic uncertainties significantly shrink if only events with low center of mass energy are considered, rendering the search in this region feasible.
  • If the lighter stop eigenstate decays directly to two jets via baryonic R-parity violation, it could have escaped existing LHC and Tevatron searches in four-jet events, even for masses as small as 100 GeV. In order to recover sensitivity in the face of increasingly harsh trigger requirements at the LHC, we propose a search for stop pairs in the highly-boosted regime, using the approaches of jet substructure. We demonstrate that the four-jet triggers can be completely bypassed by using inclusive jet-H_T triggers, and that the resulting QCD continuum background can be processed by substructure methods into a featureless spectrum suitable for a data-driven bump-hunt down to 100 GeV. We estimate that the LHC 8 TeV run is sensitive to 100 GeV stops with decays of any flavor at better than 5-sigma level, and could place exclusions up to 300 GeV or higher. Assuming Minimal Flavor Violation and running a b-tagged analysis, exclusion reach may extend up to nearly 400 GeV. Longer-term, the 14 TeV LHC at 300/fb could extend these mass limits by a factor of two, while continuing to improve sensitivity in the 100 GeV region.
  • We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally-supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.
  • Based on observational constraints on large scale structure and halo structure, dark matter is generally taken to be cold and essentially collisionless. On the other hand, given the large number of particles and forces in the visible world, a more complex dark sector could be a reasonable or even likely possibility. This hypothesis leads to testable consequences, perhaps portending the discovery of a rich hidden world neighboring our own. We consider a scenario that readily satisfies current bounds that we call Partially Interacting Dark Matter (PIDM). This scenario contains self-interacting dark matter, but it is not the dominant component. Even if PIDM contains only a fraction of the net dark matter density, comparable to the baryonic fraction, the subdominant component's interactions can lead to interesting and potentially observable consequences. Our primary focus will be the special case of Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM), in which self-interactions allow the dark matter to lose enough energy to lead to dynamics similar to those in the baryonic sector. We explore a simple model in which DDDM can cool efficiently and form a disk within galaxies, and we evaluate some of the possible observational signatures. The most prominent signal of such a scenario could be an enhanced indirect detection signature with a distinctive spatial distribution. Even though subdominant, the enhanced density at the center of the galaxy and possibly throughout the plane of the galaxy can lead to large boost factors, and could even explain a signature as large as the 130 GeV Fermi line. Such scenarios also predict additional dark radiation degrees of freedom that could soon be detectable and would influence the interpretation of future data, such as that from Planck and from the Gaia satellite. We consider this to be the first step toward exploring a rich array of new possibilities for dark matter dynamics.
  • In the presence of even minuscule baryonic R-parity violation, the stop can be the lightest superpartner and evade LHC searches because it decays into two jets. In order to cover this interesting possibility, we here consider new searches for RPV stops produced in gluino cascades. While typical searches for gluinos decaying to stops rely on same-sign dileptons, the RPV cascades usually have fewer hard leptons, less excess missing energy, and more jets than R-parity conserving cascades. If the gluino is a Dirac fermion, same-sign dilepton signals are also often highly depleted. We therefore explore search strategies that use single-lepton channels, and combat backgrounds using HT, jet counting, and more detailed multijet kinematics or jet substructure. We demonstrate that the stop mass peaks can be fully reconstructed over a broad range of spectra, even given the very high jet multiplicities. This would not only serve as a "double-discovery" opportunity, but would also be a spectacular confirmation that the elusive top-partner has been hiding in multijets.
  • Although supersymmetry remains the best candidate for solving the electroweak hierarchy problem, a supersymmetric Higgs boson near 125 GeV requires heavy scalars, highly-mixed stops, or non-minimal contributions to the Higgs potential. Extensions of the Standard Model (SM) gauge group provide an attractive means of raising the Higgs mass through non-decoupling D-term contributions to the Higgs quartic, but in most cases this correction is correlated with an enhanced coupling to bottom quarks and tau leptons that is disfavored by current fits to LHC Higgs data. In this work we demonstrate that the Higgs mass may be raised by non-decoupling D-terms without such enhanced couplings if the two supersymmetric Higgs doublets are "chiral", i.e., charged under different gauge groups at high energies. In this case there is no direct correlation between the correction to the Higgs mass and its couplings to SM states, and in general the chiral correction to the Higgs potential undoes the MSSM preference for enhanced bottom couplings. This raises the prospects for discovering additional supersymmetric Higgs bosons consistent with the measured mass and couplings of the observed Higgs.
  • Stop squarks with a mass just above the top's and which decay to a nearly massless LSP are difficult to probe because of the large SM di-top background. Here we discuss search strategies which could be used to set more stringent bounds in this difficult region. In particular, we note that both the rapidity difference Delta y(t,tbar) and spin correlations (inferred from, for example, Delta phi(l+,l-)) are sensitive to the presence of stops. We emphasize that systematic uncertainties in top quark production can confound analyses looking for stops, making theoretical and experimental progress on the understanding of Standard Model top production at high precision a very important task. We estimate that spin correlation alone, which is relatively robust against such systematic uncertainties, can exclude a 200 GeV stop at 95% confidence with 20 fb^-1 at the 8 TeV LHC.