• We investigate the use of estimators of weak lensing power spectra based on a flat-sky implementation of the Pseudo-Cl (PCl) technique, where the masked shear field is transformed without regard for masked regions of sky. This masking mixes power, and E-convergence and B-modes. To study the accuracy of forward-modelling and full-sky power spectrum recovery we consider both large-area survey geometries, and small-scale masking due to stars and a checkerboard model for field-of-view gaps. The power spectrum for the large-area survey geometry is sparsely-sampled and highly oscillatory, which makes modelling problematic. Instead, we derive an overall calibration for large-area mask bias using simulated fields. The effects of small-area star masks can be accurately corrected for, while the checkerboard mask has oscillatory and spiky behaviour which leads to percent biases. Apodisation of the masked fields leads to increased biases and a loss of information. We find that we can construct an unbiased forward-model of the raw PCls, and recover the full-sky convergence power to within a few percent accuracy for both Gaussian and lognormal-distributed shear fields. Propagating this through to cosmological parameters using a Fisher-Matrix formalism, we find we can make unbiased estimates of parameters for surveys up to 1,200 deg$^2$ with 30 galaxies per arcmin$^2$, beyond which the percent biases become larger than the statistical accuracy. This implies a flat-sky PCl analysis is accurate for current surveys but a Euclid-like survey will require higher accuracy.
  • Recently we have derived a set of mapping relations that enables the reconstruction of the family of Horndeski scalar-tensor theories which reproduce the background dynamics and linear perturbations of a given set of effective field theory of dark energy coefficients. In this paper we present a number of applications of this reconstruction. We examine the form of the underlying theories behind different phenomenological parameterizations of modified gravity and dark energy used in the literature, as well as examine theories that exhibit weak gravity, linear shielding, and minimal self-acceleration. Finally, we propose a new inherently stable parametrization basis for modified gravity and dark energy models.
  • Studying the effects of dark energy and modified gravity on cosmological scales has led to a great number of physical models being developed. The effective field theory (EFT) of cosmic acceleration allows an efficient exploration of this large model space, usually carried out on a phenomenological basis. However, constraints on such parametrized EFT coefficients cannot be trivially connected to fundamental covariant theories. In this paper we reconstruct the class of covariant Horndeski scalar-tensor theories that reproduce the same background dynamics and linear perturbations as a given EFT action. One can use this reconstruction to interpret constraints on parametrized EFT coefficients in terms of viable covariant Horndeski theories. We demonstrate this method with a number of well-known models and discuss a range of future applications.
  • We investigate the problem of noise bias in maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for cosmic shear. We derive the leading and next-to-leading order biases and compute them in the context of galaxy ellipticity measurements, extending previous work on maximum likelihood inference for weak lensing. We show that a large part of the bias on these point estimators can be removed using information already contained in the likelihood when a galaxy model is specified, without the need for external calibration. We test these bias-corrected estimators on simulated galaxy images similar to those expected from planned space-based weak lensing surveys, with promising results. We find that the introduction of an intrinsic shape prior can help with mitigation of noise bias, such that the maximum a posteriori estimate can be made less biased than the maximum likelihood estimate. Second-order terms offer a check on the convergence of the estimators, but are largely sub-dominant. We show how biases propagate to shear estimates, demonstrating in our simple setup that shear biases can be reduced by orders of magnitude and potentially to within the requirements of planned space-based surveys at mild signal-to-noise. We find that second-order terms can exhibit significant cancellations at low signal-to-noise when Gaussian noise is assumed, which has implications for inferring the performance of shear-measurement algorithms from simplified simulations. We discuss the viability of our point estimators as tools for lensing inference, arguing that they allow for the robust measurement of ellipticity and shear.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We identify a scalar-tensor model embedded in the Horndeski action whose cosmological background and linear scalar fluctuations are degenerate with the concordance cosmology. The model admits a self-accelerated background expansion at late times that is stable against perturbations with a sound speed attributed to the new field that is equal to the speed of light. While degenerate in scalar fluctuations, self-acceleration of the model implies a present cosmological tensor mode propagation at < 95% of the speed of light with a damping of the wave amplitude that is > 5% less efficient than in general relativity. We show that these discrepancies are endemic to self-accelerated Horndeski theories with degenerate large-scale structure and are tested with measurements of gravitational waves emitted by events at cosmological distances. Hence, gravitational-wave cosmology breaks the dark degeneracy in observations of the large-scale structure between two fundamentally different explanations of cosmic acceleration - a cosmological constant and a scalar-tensor modification of gravity. The gravitational wave event GW150914 recently detected with the aLIGO instruments and its potential association with a weak short gamma-ray burst observed with the Fermi GBM experiment may have provided this crucial measurement.
  • We present a derivation of a generalized optimally-weighted estimator for the weak lensing magnification signal, including a calculation of errors. With this estimator, we present a local method for optimally estimating the local effects of magnification from weak gravitational lensing, using a comparison of number counts in an arbitrary region of space to the expected unmagnified number counts. We show that when equivalent lens and source samples are used, this estimator is simply related to the optimally-weighted correlation function estimator used in past work and vice-versa, but this method has the benefits that it can calculate errors with significantly less computational time, that it can handle overlapping lens and source samples, and that it can easily be extended to mass-mapping. We present a proof-of-principle test of this method on data from the CFHTLenS, showing that its calculated magnification signals agree with predictions from model fits to shear data. Finally, we investigate how magnification data can be used to supplement shear data in determining the best-fit model mass profiles for galaxy dark matter haloes. We find that at redshifts greater than z ~ 0.6, the inclusion of magnification can often significantly improve the constraints on the components of the mass profile which relate to galaxies' local environments relative to shear alone, and in high-redshift, low- and medium-mass bins, it can have a higher signal-to-noise than the shear signal.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Linear cosmological perturbations of a large class of modified gravity and dark energy models can be unified in the effective field theory of cosmic acceleration, encompassing Horndeski scalar-tensor theories and beyond. The fully available model space inherent to this formalism cannot be constrained by measurements in the quasistatic small-scale regime alone. To facilitate the analysis of modifications from the concordance model beyond this limit, we introduce a semi-dynamical treatment extrapolated from the evolution of perturbations at a pivot scale of choice. At small scales, and for Horndeski theories, the resulting modifications recover a quasistatic approximation but account for corrections to it near the Hubble scale. For models beyond Horndeski gravity, we find that the velocity field and time derivative of the spatial metric potential can generally not be neglected, even in the small-scale limit. We test the semi-dynamical approximation against the linear perturbations of a range of dark energy and modified gravity models, finding good agreement between the two.
  • $f(R)$ gravity is one of the simplest theories of modified gravity to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion. Although it is usually assumed that the quasi-Newtonian approach (a combination of the quasi-static approximation and sub-Hubble limit) for cosmic perturbations is good enough to describe the evolution of large scale structure in $f(R)$ models, some studies have suggested that this method is not valid for all $f(R)$ models. Here, we show that in the matter-dominated era, the pressure and shear equations alone, which can be recast into four first-order equations to solve for cosmological perturbations exactly, are sufficient to solve for the Newtonian potential, $\Psi$, and the curvature potential, $\Phi$. Based on these two equations, we are able to clarify how the exact linear perturbations fit into different limits. We find that the Compton length controls the quasi-static behaviours in $f(R)$ gravity. In addition, regardless the validity of quasi-static approximation, a strong version of the sub-Hubble limit alone is sufficient to reduce the exact linear perturbations in any viable $f(R)$ gravity to second order. Our findings disagree with some previous studies where we find little difference between our exact and quasi-Newtonian solutions even up to $k=10 c^{-1} \mathcal{H}_0$.
  • Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a test of the non-gravitational forces acting on dark matter. Dark matter's lack of deceleration in the `bullet cluster collision' constrained its self-interaction cross-section \sigma_DM/m < 1.25cm2/g (68% confidence limit) for long-ranged forces. Using the Chandra and Hubble Space Telescopes we have now observed 72 collisions, including both `major' and `minor' mergers. Combining these measurements statistically, we detect the existence of dark mass at 7.6\sigma significance. The position of the dark mass has remained closely aligned within 5.8+/-8.2 kpc of associated stars: implying a self-interaction cross-section \sigma_DM/m < 0.47 cm2/g (95% CL) and disfavoring some proposed extensions to the standard model.
  • We study the model space generated by the time-dependent operator coefficients in the effective field theory of the cosmological background evolution and perturbations of modified gravity and dark energy models. We identify three classes of modified gravity models that reduce to Newtonian gravity on the small scales of linear theory. These general classes contain enough freedom to simultaneously admit a matching of the concordance model background expansion history. In particular, there exists a large model space that mimics the concordance model on all linear quasistatic subhorizon scales as well as in the background evolution. Such models also exist when restricting the theory space to operators introduced in Horndeski scalar-tensor gravity. We emphasize that whereas the partially shielded scenarios might be of interest to study in connection with tensions between large and small scale data, with conventional cosmological probes, the ability to distinguish the fully shielded scenarios from the concordance model on near-horizon scales will remain limited by cosmic variance. Novel tests of the large-scale structure remedying this deficiency and accounting for the full covariant nature of the alternative gravitational theories, however, might yield further insights on gravity in this regime.
  • Current and forthcoming cosmological data analyses share the challenge of huge datasets alongside increasingly tight requirements on the precision and accuracy of extracted cosmological parameters. The community is becoming increasingly aware that these requirements not only apply to the central values of parameters but, equally important, also to the error bars. Due to non-linear effects in the astrophysics, the instrument, and the analysis pipeline, data covariance matrices are usually not well known a priori and need to be estimated from the data itself, or from suites of large simulations. In either case, the finite number of realisations available to determine data covariances introduces significant biases and additional variance in the errors on cosmological parameters in a standard likelihood analysis. Here, we review recent work on quantifying these biases and additional variances and discuss approaches to remedy these effects.
  • We demonstrate that the intrinsic alignment of galaxies with large-scale tidal fields sources an extra contribution to the recently-detected cross-correlation of galaxy shear and weak lensing of the microwave background. The extra term is the analogy of the 'GI' term in standard cosmic shear studies, and results in a reduction in the amplitude of the cross-correlation. We compute the intrinsic alignment contribution in linear and non-linear theory, and show that it can be at roughly the 15% level for the CFHT Stripe 82 redshift distribution, if the canonical amplitude of intrinsic alignments is assumed. The new term can therefore potentially reconcile the apparently low value of the measured cross-correlation with standard LCDM. We discuss various small-scale effects in the signal and the dependence on the source redshift distribution. We discuss the exciting possibility of self-calibrating intrinsic alignments with a joint analysis of cosmic shear and weak lensing of the microwave background
  • Background: The eMouse Atlas of Gene Expression (EMAGE) is an online resource that publishes the results of in situ gene expression experiments on the developmental mouse. The resource provides comprehensive search facilities, but few analytical tools or visual mechanisms for navigating the data set. To deal with the missing visual navigation, this paper explores the application of sunburst and icicle visualizations within EMAGE. Results: A prototype solution delivered a simple user interface that helps the user query EMAGE and generate a sunburst/icicle diagram. An evaluation featuring test subjects from the EMAGE staff studied the visualizations and provided a range of suggested improvements. Moreover the evaluation discovered that in addition to providing a visual means of walking through the data, when grouped, the sunburst delivers an interactive overview that assists with analysing sets of related genes. Conclusions: The sunburst and icicle visualizations have been shown to be effective tools for summarising gene expression data. The sunburst with its space saving radial layout was found especially useful for providing an overview of gene families or pathways. Work is ongoing to integrate these visualizations into EMAGE.
  • We investigate the bias and error in estimates of the cosmological parameter covariance matrix, due to sampling or modelling the data covariance matrix, for likelihood width and peak scatter estimators. We show that these estimators do not coincide unless the data covariance is exactly known. For sampled data covariances, with Gaussian distributed data and parameters, the parameter covariance matrix estimated from the width of the likelihood has a Wishart distribution, from which we derive the mean and covariance. This mean is biased and we propose an unbiased estimator of the parameter covariance matrix. Comparing our analytic results to a numerical Wishart sampler of the data covariance matrix we find excellent agreement. An accurate ansatz for the mean parameter covariance for the peak scatter estimator is found, and we fit its covariance to our numerical analysis. The mean is again biased and we propose an unbiased estimator for the peak parameter covariance. For sampled data covariances the width estimator is more accurate than the peak scatter estimator. We investigate modelling the data covariance, or equivalently data compression, and shown that the peak scatter estimator is less sensitive to biases in the model data covariance matrix than the width estimator, but requires independent realisations of the data to reduce the statistical error. If the model bias on the peak estimator is sufficiently low this is promising, otherwise the sampled width estimator is preferable.
  • We develop a statistical method to measure the interaction cross-section of Dark Matter, exploiting the continuous minor merger events in which small substructures fall into galaxy clusters. We find that by taking the ratio of the distances between the galaxies and Dark Matter, and galaxies and gas in accreting sub-halos, we form a quantity that can be statistically averaged over a large sample of systems whilst removing any inherent line-of-sight projections. In order to interpret this ratio as a cross-section of Dark Matter we derive an analytical description of sub-halo infall which encompasses; the force of the main cluster potential, the drag on a gas sub-halo, a model for Dark Matter self-interactions and the resulting sub-halo drag, the force on the gas and galaxies due to the Dark Matter sub-halo potential, and finally the buoyancy on the gas and Dark Matter. We create mock observations from cosmological simulations of structure formation and find that collisionless Dark Matter becomes physically separated from X-ray gas by up to 20h^-1 kpc. Adding realistic levels of noise, we are able to predict achievable constraints from observational data. Current archival data should be able to detect a difference in the dynamical behaviour of Dark Matter and standard model particles at 6 sigma, and measure the total interaction cross-section sigma/m with 68% confidence limits of +/- 1cm2g^-1. We note that this method is not restricted by the limited number of major merging events and is easily extended to large samples of clusters from future surveys which could potentially push statistical errors to 0.1cm^2g^-1.
  • We present a simulation analysis of weak gravitational lensing flexion and shear measurement using shapelet decomposition, and identify differences between flexion and shear measurement noise in deep survey data. Taking models of galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) and applying a correction for the HUDF point spread function we generate lensed simulations of deep, optical imaging data from Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), with realistic galaxy morphologies. We find that flexion and shear estimates differ in our measurement pipeline: whereas intrinsic galaxy shape is typically the dominant contribution to noise in shear estimates, pixel noise due to finite photon counts and detector read noise is a major contributor to uncertainty in flexion estimates, across a broad range of galaxy signal-to-noise. This pixel noise also increases more rapidly as galaxy signal-to-noise decreases than is found for shear estimates. We provide simple power law fitting functions for this behaviour, for both flexion and shear, allowing the effect to be properly accounted for in future forecasts for flexion measurement. Using the simulations we also quantify the systematic biases of our shapelet flexion and shear measurement pipeline for deep Hubble data sets such as Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs, Space Telescope A901/902 Galaxy Evolution Survey or the Cosmic Evolution Survey. Flexion measurement biases are found to be significant but consistent with previous studies.
  • Direct evidence for the existence of dark matter and measurements of its interaction cross-section have been provided by the physical offset between dark matter and intra- cluster gas in merging systems like the Bullet Cluster. Although a smaller signal, this effect is more abundant in minor mergers where infalling substructure dark matter and gas are segregated. In such low-mass systems the gravitational lensing signal comes primarily from weak lensing. A fundamental step in determining such an offset in sub- structure is the ability to accurately measure the positions of dark matter sub-peaks. Using simulated Hubble Space Telescope observations, we make a first assessment of the precision and accuracy with which we can measure infalling groups using weak gravitational lensing. We demonstrate that using an existing and well-used mass re- construction algorithm can measure the positions of 1.5x1013 M substructures that have parent halos ten times more massive with a bias of less than 0.3 . In this regime, our analysis suggests the precision is sufficient to detect (at 3 {\sigma} statistical significance) the expected mean offset between dark matter and baryonic gas in infalling groups from a sample of 50 massive clusters.
  • Cosmological parameter estimation requires that the likelihood function of the data is accurately known. Assuming that cosmological large-scale structure power spectra data are multivariate Gaussian-distributed, we show the accuracy of parameter estimation is limited by the accuracy of the inverse data covariance matrix - the precision matrix. If the data covariance and precision matrices are estimated by sampling independent realisations of the data, their statistical properties are described by the Wishart and Inverse-Wishart distributions, respectively. Independent of any details of the survey, we show that the fractional error on a parameter variance, or a Figure-of-Merit, is equal to the fractional variance of the precision matrix. In addition, for the only unbiased estimator of the precision matrix, we find that the fractional accuracy of the parameter error depends only on the difference between the number of independent realisations and the number of data points, and so can easily diverge. For a 5% error on a parameter error and N_D << 100 data-points, a minimum of 200 realisations of the survey are needed, with 10% accuracy for the data covariance. If the number of data-points N_D >>100 we need N_S > N_D realisations and a fractional accuracy of <sqrt[2/N_D] in the data covariance. As the number of power spectra data points grows to N_D>10^4 -10^6 this approach will be problematic. We discuss possible ways to relax these conditions: improved theoretical modelling; shrinkage methods; data-compression; simulation and data resampling methods.
  • We present a method for attaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability during sub- orbital balloon flights, as designed for in the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO) concept. The pointing method presented here has the potential to perform near-space quality optical astronomical imaging at 1-2% of the cost of space-based missions. We also discuss an architecture that can achieve sufficient thermomechanical stability to match the pointing stability. This concept is motivated by advances in the development and testing of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights which promise to allow observation campaigns lasting more than three months. The design incorporates a multi-stage pointing architecture comprising: a gondola coarse azimuth control system, a multi-axis nested gimbal frame structure with arcsecond stability, a telescope de-rotator to eliminate field rotation, and a fine guidance stage consisting of both a telescope mounted angular rate sensor and guide CCDs in the focal plane to drive a fast-steering mirror. We discuss the results of pointing tests together with a preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis required for sub-arcsecond pointing at high altitude. Possible future applications in the areas of wide-field surveys and exoplanet searches are also discussed.
  • GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) is a public image analysis challenge aimed at the development of algorithms to analyze astronomical images. Specifically, the challenge is to measure varying image distortions in the presence of a variable convolution kernel, pixelization and noise. This is the second in a series of challenges set to the astronomy, computer science and statistics communities, providing a structured environment in which methods can be improved and tested in preparation for planned astronomical surveys. GREAT10 extends upon previous work by introducing variable fields into the challenge. The "Galaxy Challenge" involves the precise measurement of galaxy shape distortions, quantified locally by two parameters called shear, in the presence of a known convolution kernel. Crucially, the convolution kernel and the simulated gravitational lensing shape distortion both now vary as a function of position within the images, as is the case for real data. In addition, we introduce the "Star Challenge" that concerns the reconstruction of a variable convolution kernel, similar to that in a typical astronomical observation. This document details the GREAT10 Challenge for potential participants. Continually updated information is also available from http://www.greatchallenges.info.
  • The amplitude of weak lensing should increase with source distance, rising steeply behind a lens and saturating at high redshift, providing a model-independent means of measuring cosmic geometry. We measure the amplitude of weak lensing with redshift for three massive clusters, A370 (z=0.375), ZwCl0024+17 (z=0.395) and RXJ1347-11 (z=0.451), using deep, three-colour Subaru imaging. We define the depth of lensed populations with reference to the COSMOS and GOODS fields, providing a consistency check of photo-z estimates over a wide range of redshift and magnitude. The predicted distance-redshift relation is followed well for the deepest dataset, A370, for a wide range of cosmologies, and is consistent with less accurate data for the other two clusters. Scaling this result to a new survey of ~25 massive clusters should provide a useful cosmological constraint on w, complementing existing techniques, with distance measurements covering the untested redshift range, 1<z<5.
  • Both observations and simulations show that major tidal interactions or mergers between gas-rich galaxies can lead to intense bursts of starformation. Yet, the average enhancement in star formation rate (SFR) in major mergers and the contribution of such events to the cosmic SFR are not well estimated. Here we use photometric redshifts, stellar masses and UV SFRs from COMBO-17, 24 micron SFRs from Spitzer and morphologies from two deep HST cosmological survey fields (ECDFS/GEMS and A901/STAGES) to study the enhancement in SFR as a function of projected galaxy separation. We apply two-point projected correlation function techniques, which we augment with morphologically-selected very close pairs (separation <2 arcsec) and merger remnants from the HST imaging. Our analysis confirms that the most intensely star-forming systems are indeed interacting or merging. Yet, for massive (M* > 10^10 Msun) star-forming galaxies at 0.4<z<0.8, we find that the SFRs of galaxies undergoing a major interaction (mass ratios <1:4 and separations < 40 kpc) are only 1.80 +/- 0.30 times higher than the SFRs of non-interacting galaxies when averaged over all interactions and all stages of the interaction, in good agreement with other observational works. We demonstrate that these results imply that <10% of star formation at 0.4 < z < 0.8 is triggered directly by major mergers and interactions; these events are not important factors in the build-up of stellar mass since z=1.
  • Combining redshift and galaxy shape information offers new exciting ways of exploiting the gravitational lensing effect for studying the large scales of the cosmos. One application is the three-dimensional reconstruction of the matter density distribution which is explored in this paper. We give a generalisation of an already known minimum-variance estimator of the 3-D matter density distribution that facilitates the combination of thin redshift slices of sources with samples of broad redshift distributions for an optimal reconstruction. We show how, in principle, intrinsic alignments of source ellipticities or shear/intrinsic alignment correlations can be accommodated, albeit these effects are not the focus of this paper. We describe an efficient and fast way to implement the estimator on a contemporary desktop computer. Analytic estimates for the noise and biases in the reconstruction are given. The bias -- a spread and shift of structures in radial direction -- can be expressed in terms of a radial PSF, comprising the limitations of the reconstruction due to source shot-noise and the unavoidably broad lensing kernel. We conclude that a 3-D mass-density reconstruction on galaxy cluster scales is feasible but, for foreseeable surveys, a map with a S/N>~3 threshold is limited to structures with M200>~10^14 Msol/h, or 7x10^14 Msol/h, at low to moderate redshifts (z=0.1 or 0.6). However, we find that a heavily smoothed full-sky map of the very large-scale density field may also be possible as the S/N of reconstructed modes increases towards larger scales. Future improvements of the method can be obtained by including higher-order lensing information (flexion) which could also be implemented into our algorithm. [ABRIDGED]