• The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency, wide field-of-view radio interferometer under development at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. We have used a 32-element MWA prototype interferometer (MWA-32T) to observe two 50-degree diameter fields in the southern sky in the 110 MHz to 200 MHz band in order to evaluate the performance of the MWA-32T, to develop techniques for epoch of reionization experiments, and to make measurements of astronomical foregrounds. We developed a calibration and imaging pipeline for the MWA-32T, and used it to produce ~15' angular resolution maps of the two fields. We perform a blind source extraction using these confusion-limited images, and detect 655 sources at high significance with an additional 871 lower significance source candidates. We compare these sources with existing low-frequency radio surveys in order to assess the MWA-32T system performance, wide field analysis algorithms, and catalog quality. Our source catalog is found to agree well with existing low-frequency surveys in these regions of the sky and with statistical distributions of point sources derived from Northern Hemisphere surveys; it represents one of the deepest surveys to date of this sky field in the 110 MHz to 200 MHz band.
  • In order to construct accurate point sources simulations at the frequencies relevant to 21-cm experiments, the angular correlation of radio sources must be taken into account. This paper presents a measurement of angular two-point correlation function, w(\theta), at 232 MHz from the MIYUN survey - tentative measurements of w(\theta) are also performed at 151 MHz. It is found that double power law with shape w(\theta) = A \theta^{-\gamma} fits the 232 MHz data well. For the angular lenght of 0.2 degrees < \theta < 0.6 degrees, \gamma ~ -1.12, and this value of slope is independent of the flux-density threshold; while for angular lenghts much greater than 0.6 degrees, \gamma has a shallower value of about -0.16. By comparing the results of this paper with previous measurements of w(\theta), it is discussed how w(\theta) changes with the change of frequency and completness limit.
  • In order to construct accurate point sources simulations at the frequencies relevant to 21 cm experiments, the angular correlation of radio sources must be taken into account. Using the 74 MHz VLSS survey, we measured the angular 2-point correlation function, w(\theta). We obtain the first measurement of clustering at the low frequencies relevant to 21 cm tomography. We find that a single power law with shape w(\theta) = A \theta^{-\gamma} fits well the data. For a galactic cut of 10 degrees, with a data cut of \delta less than -10 degrees, and a flux limit of S = 770 mJy, we obtain a slope of \gamma = (-1.2 +/- 0.35). This value of \gamma is consistent with that measured from other radio catalogues at the millimeter wavelengths. The amplitude of clustering has a length of 0.2 degrees - 0.6 degrees, and it is independent of the flux-density threshold.
  • Understanding diffuse Galactic radio emission is interesting both in its own right and for minimizing foreground contamination of cosmological measurements. Cosmic Microwave Background experiments have focused on frequencies > 10 GHz, whereas 21 cm tomography of the high redshift universe will mainly focus on < 0.2 GHz, for which less is currently known about Galactic emission. Motivated by this, we present a global sky model derived from all publicly available total power large-area radio surveys, digitized with optical character recognition when necessary and compiled into a uniform format, as well as the new Villa Elisa data extending the 1.4 GHz map to the entire sky. We quantify statistical and systematic uncertainties in these surveys by comparing them with various global multi-frequency model fits. We find that a principal component based model with only three components can fit the 11 most accurate data sets (at 10, 22, 45 & 408 MHz and 1.4, 2.3, 23, 33, 41, 61, 94 GHz) to an accuracy around 1%-10% depending on frequency and sky region. Both our data compilation and our software returning a predicted all-sky map at any frequency from 10 MHz to 100 GHz are publicly available at http://space.mit.edu/home/angelica/gsm .
  • Most analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background spherical harmonic coefficients a_lm has focused on estimating the power spectrum C_l=<|a_lm|^2> rather than the coefficients themselves. We present a minimum-variance method for measuring a_lm given anisotropic noise, incomplete sky coverage and foreground contamination, and apply it to the WMAP data. Our method is shown to constitute lossless data compression in the sense that the widely used quadratic estimators of the power spectrum C_l can be computed directly from our a_lm-estimators. As the Galactic cut is increased, the error bars Delta-a_lm on low multipoles go from being dominated by foregrounds to being dominated by sample variance from other multipoles, with the intervening minimum defining the optimal cut. Applying our method to the WMAP quadrupole and octopole, we find that their previously reported "axis of evil" alignment appears to be rather robust to Galactic cut and foreground contamination.
  • The DASI discovery of CMB polarization has opened a new chapter in cosmology. Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where Galactic foreground contamination is the worst, so a key challenge is to model, quantify and remove polarized foregrounds. We use the POLAR experiment, COBE/DMR and radio surveys to provide the strongest limits to date on the TE cross power spectrum of the CMB on large angular scales and to quantify the polarized synchrotron radiation, which is likely to be the most challenging polarized contaminant for the MAP satellite. We find that the synchrotron E- and B-contributions are equal to within 10% from 408-820 MHz with a hint of E-domination at higher frequencies. We quantify Faraday Rotation and Depolarization effects in the two-dimensional (l,nu)-plane and show that they cause the synchrotron polarization percentage to drop both towards lower frequencies and towards lower multipoles.
  • Great efforts are currently being channeled into ground- and balloon-based CMB experiments, mainly to explore anisotropy on small angular scales and polarization. To optimize instrumental design and assess experimental prospects, it is important to understand in detail the atmosphere-related systematic errors that limit the science achievable with new suborbital instruments. For this purpose, we spatially compare the 648 square degree ground- and balloon-based QMASK map with the atmosphere-free WMAP map, finding beautiful agreement on all angular scales where both are sensitive. This is a reassuring quantitative assessment of the power of the state-of-the-art FFT- and matrix-based mapmaking techniques that have been used for QMASK and virtually all subsequent experiments.
  • The DASI discovery of CMB polarization, confirmed by WMAP, has opened a new chapter in cosmology. Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where Galactic foreground contamination is the worst. The goal of the present review is to provide the state-of-the-art of the CMB polarization from a practical point of view, connecting real-world data to physical models. We present the physics of this polarized phenomena and illustrate how it depends of various cosmological parameters for standard adiabatic models. We also present all observational constraints to date and discuss how much we have learned about polarized foregrounds so far from the CMB studies. Finally, we comment on future prospects for the measurement of CMB polarization.
  • The WMAP team has produced a foreground map that can account for most of the low-frequency Galactic microwave emission in the WMAP maps, tentatively interpreting it as synchrotron emission. Finkbeiner and collaborators have challenged these conclusions, arguing that the WMAP team "synchrotron" template is in fact not dominated by synchrotron radiation, but by some dust-related Galactic emission process, perhaps spinning dust grains, making dramatically different predictions for its behavior at lower frequencies. By cross-correlating this "synchrotron" template with 10 and 15 GHz CMB observations, we find that its spectrum turns over in a manner consistent with spinning dust emission, falling about an order of magnitude below what the synchrotron interpretation would predict.
  • We investigate anomalies reported in the Cosmic Microwave Background maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite on very large angular scales and discuss possible interpretations. Three independent anomalies involve the quadrupole and octopole: 1. The cosmic quadrupole on its own is anomalous at the 1-in-20 level by being low (the cut-sky quadrupole measured by the WMAP team is more strikingly low, apparently due to a coincidence in the orientation of our Galaxy of no cosmological significance); 2. The cosmic octopole on its own is anomalous at the 1-in-20 level by being very planar; 3. The alignment between the quadrupole and octopole is anomalous at the 1-in-60 level. Although the a priori chance of all three occurring is 1 in 24000, the multitude of alternative anomalies one could have looked for dilutes the significance of such a posteriori statistics. The simplest small universe model where the universe has toroidal topology with one small dimension of order half the horizon scale, in the direction towards Virgo, could explain the three items above. However, we rule this model out using two topological tests: the S-statistic and the matched circle test.
  • Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where Galactic foreground contamination is the worst, so a key challenge is to model, quantify and remove polarized foregrounds. We use the Leiden radio surveys to quantify the polarized synchrotron radiation at large angular scales, which is likely to be the most challenging polarized contaminant for the WMAP satellite. We find that the synchrotron E- and B-contributions are equal to within 10% from 408-820MHz with a hint of E-domination at higher frequencies. We quantify Faraday Rotation & Depolarization effects and show that they cause the synchrotron polarization percentage to drop both towards lower frequencies and towards lower multipoles.
  • We compute upper limits on CMB cross-polarization by cross-correlating the PIQUE and Saskatoon experiments. We also discuss theoretical and practical issues relevant to measuring cross-polarization and illustrate them with simulations of the upcoming BOOMERanG 2002 experiment. We present a method that separates all six polarization power spectra (TT, EE, BB, TE, TB, EB) without any other "leakage" than the familiar EE-BB mixing caused by incomplete sky coverage. Since E and B get mixed, one might expect leakage between TE and TB, between EE and EB and between BB and EB - our method eliminates this by preserving the parity symmetry under which TB and EB are odd and the other four power spectra are even.
  • We measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum on angular scales l~30-200 (1-6 degrees) from the QMASK map, which combines the data from the QMAP and Saskatoon experiments. Since the accuracy of recent measurements leftward of the first acoustic peak is limited by sample-variance, the large area of the QMASK map (648 square degrees) allows us to place among the sharpest constraints to date in this range, in good agreement with BOOMERanG and (on the largest scales) COBE/DMR. By band-pass-filtering the QMAP and Saskatoon maps, we are able to spatially compare them scale-by-scale to check for beam- and pointing-related systematic errors.
  • We present a new puzzle involving Galactic microwave emission and attempt to resolve it. On one hand, a cross-correlation analysis of the WHAM H-alpha map with the Tenerife 10 and 15 GHz maps shows that the well-known DIRBE correlated microwave emission cannot be dominated by free-free emission. On the other hand, recent high resolution observations in the 8-10 GHz range with the Green Bank 140 ft telescope by Finkbeiner et al. failed to find the corresponding 8 sigma signal that would be expected in the simplest spinning dust models. So what physical mechanism is causing this ubiquitous dust-correlated emission? We argue for a model predicting that spinning dust is the culprit after all, but that the corresponding small grains are well correlated with the larger grains seen at 100 micron only on large angular scales. In support of this grain segregation model, we find the best spinning dust template to involve higher frequency maps in the range 12-60 micron, where emission from transiently heated small grains is important. Upcoming CMB experiments such as ground-based interferometers, MAP and Planck LFI with high resolution at low frequencies should allow a definitive test of this model.
  • We present a method for measuring CMB polarization power spectra given incomplete sky coverage and test it with simulated examples such as Boomerang 2001 and MAP. By augmenting the quadratic estimator method with an additional step, we find that the E and B power spectra can be effectively disentangled on angular scales substantially smaller than the width of the sky patch in the narrowest direction. We find that the basic quadratic and maximum-likelihood methods display a unneccesary sensitivity to systematic errors when T-E cross-correlation is involved, and show how this problem can be eliminated at negligible cost in increased error bars. We also test numerically the widely used approximation that sample variance scales inversely with sky coverage, and find it to be an excellent approximation on scales substantially smaller than the sky patch.
  • We present an upper limit on the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background at 7 degree angular scales in the frequency band between 26 and 36 GHz, produced by the POLAR experiment. The campaign produced a map of linear polarization over the R.A. range 112 degrees - 275 degrees at declination 43degrees. The model-independent upper limit on the E-mode polarization component of the CMB at angular scales l = 2 - 20 is 10 microKelvin (95% confidence). The corresponding limit for the B-mode is also 10 microKelvin. Constraining the B-mode power to be zero, the 95% confidence limit on E-mode power alone is 8 microKelvin.
  • We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP and COBE/DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signal at the 21 sigma and 40 sigma levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka- and Q-bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available at www.hep.upenn.edu/~xuyz/qmask.html together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE/DMR, showing good agreement.
  • We present Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps from the Santa Barbara HACME balloon experiment (Staren etal 2000), covering about 1150 square degrees split between two regions in the northern sky, near the stars gamma Ursae Minoris and alpha Leonis, respectively. The FWHM of the beam is about 0.77 degrees in three frequency bands centered on 39, 41 and 43 GHz. The results demonstrate that the thoroughly interconnected scan strategy employed allows efficient removal of 1/f-noise and slightly variable scan-synchronous offsets. The maps display no striping, and the noise correlations are found to be virtually isotropic, decaying on an angular scale around one degree. The noise performance of the experiment resulted in an upper limit on CMB anisotropy. However, our results demonstrate that atmospheric contamination and other systematics resulting from the circular scanning strategy can be accurately controlled, and bodes well for the planned follow-up experiments BEAST and ACE, since they show that even with the overly cautious assumption that 1/f-noise and offsets will be as dominant as for HACME, the problems they pose can be readily overcome with the mapmaking algorithm discussed. Our prewhitened notch-filter algorithm for destriping and offset removal should be useful also for other balloon- and ground-based experiments whose scan strategies involve substantial interleaving.
  • We quantify the level of foreground contamination in the QMAP Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data with two objectives: (a) measuring the level to which the QMAP power spectrum measurements need to be corrected for foregrounds and (b) using this data set to further refine current foreground models. We cross-correlate the QMAP data with a variety of foreground templates. The 30 GHz Ka-band data is found to be significantly correlated with the Haslam 408 MHz and Reich and Reich 1420 MHz synchrotron maps, but not with the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) 240, 140 and 100 micron maps or the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) survey. The 40 GHz Q-band has no significant template correlations. We discuss the constraints that this places on synchrotron, free-free and dust emission. We also reanalyze the foreground-cleaned Ka-band data and find that the two band power measurements are lowered by 2.3% and 1.3%, respectively.
  • The recent discovery of dust-correlated diffuse microwave emission has prompted two rival explanations: free-free emission and spinning dust grains. We present new detections of this component at 10 and 15 GHz by the switched-beam Tenerife experiment. The data show a turnover in the spectrum and thereby supports the spinning dust hypothesis. We also present a significant detection of synchrotron radiation at 10 GHz, useful for normalizing foreground contamination of CMB experiments at high-galactic latitudes.
  • One of the main challenges facing upcoming CMB experiments will be to distinguish the cosmological signal from foreground contamination. We present a comprehensive treatment of this problem and study how foregrounds degrade the accuracy with which the Boomerang, MAP and Planck experiments can measure cosmological parameters. Our foreground model includes not only the normalization, frequency dependence and scale dependence for each physical component, but also variations in frequency dependence across the sky. When estimating how accurately cosmological parameter can be measured, we include the important complication that foreground model parameters (we use about 500) must be simultaneously measured from the data as well. Our results are quite encouraging: despite all these complications, precision measurements of most cosmological parameters are degraded by less than a factor of 2 for our main foreground model and by less than a factor of 5 in our most pessimistic scenario. Parameters measured though large-angle polarization signals suffer more degradation: up to 5 in the main model and 25 in the pessimistic case. The foregrounds that are potentially most damaging and therefore most in need of further study are vibrating dust emission and point sources, especially those in the radio frequencies. It is well-known that E and B polarization contain valuable information about reionization and gravity waves, respectively. However, the cross-correlation between polarized and unpolarized foregrounds also deserves further study, as we find that it carries the bulk of the polarization information about most other cosmological parameters.
  • We cross-correlate a 19 GHz full sky Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) survey with other maps to quantify the foreground contribution. Correlations are detected with the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) 240, 140 and 100 micron maps at high latitudes (|b|>30degrees), and marginal correlations are detected with the Haslam 408 MHz and the Reich & Reich 1420 MHz synchrotron maps. The former agree well with extrapolations from higher frequencies probed by the COBE DMR and Saskatoon experiments and are consistent with both free-free and rotating dust grain emission.
  • We report on the first flight of the balloon-borne QMAP experiment. The experiment is designed to make a map of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on angular scales from 0.7 to several degrees. Using the map we determine the angular power spectrum of the anisotropy in multipole bands from l~40 to l~140. The results are consistent with the Saskatoon (SK) measurements. The frequency spectral index (measured at low l) is consistent with that of CMB and inconsistent with either Galactic synchrotron or free-free emission. The instrument, measurement, analysis of the angular power spectrum, and possible systematic errors are discussed.
  • We report the results from the second flight of QMAP, an experiment to map the cosmic microwave background near the North Celestial Pole. We present maps of the sky at 31 and 42 GHz as well as a measurement of the angular power spectrum covering the l-range 40-200. Anisotropy is detected at about 20 sigma and is in agreement with previous results at these angular scales. We also report details of the data reduction and analysis techniques which were used for both flights of QMAP.
  • We present results from the QMAP balloon experiment, which maps the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and probes its angular power spectrum on degree scales. In two separate flights, data were taken in six channels at two frequency bands between 26 to 46 GHz. We describe our method for mapmaking (removal of 1/f-noise and scan-synchronous offsets) and power spectrum estimation, as well as the results of a joint analysis of the data from both flights. This produces a 527 square degree map of the CMB around the North Celestial Pole, allowing a wide variety of systematic cross-checks. The frequency dependence of the fluctuations is consistent with CMB and inconsistent with Galactic foreground emission. The anisotropy is measured in three multipole bands from l~40 to l~200, and the angular power spectrum shows a distinct rise which is consistent with the Saskatoon results.