• Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • Global, secure quantum channels will require efficient distribution of entangled photons. Long distance, low-loss interconnects can only be realized using photons as quantum information carriers. However, a quantum light source combining both high qubit fidelity and on-demand bright emission has proven elusive. Here, we show a bright photonic nanostructure generating polarization-entangled photon-pairs that strongly violates Bell's inequality. A highly symmetric InAsP quantum dot generating entangled photons is encapsulated in a tapered nanowire waveguide to ensure directional emission and efficient light extraction. We collect $\sim$200 kHz entangled photon-pairs at the first lens under 80\,MHz pulsed excitation, which is a 20 times enhancement as compared to a bare quantum dot without a photonic nanostructure. The performed Bell test using the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality reveals a clear violation ($S_{\text{CHSH}}>2$) by up to 9.3 standard deviations. By using a novel quasi-resonant excitation scheme at the wurtzite InP nanowire resonance to reduce multi-photon emission, the entanglement fidelity ($F=0.817\,\pm\,0.002$) is further enhanced without temporal post-selection, allowing for the violation of Bell's inequality in the rectilinear-circular basis by 25 standard deviations. Our results on nanowire-based quantum light sources highlight their potential application in secure data communication utilizing measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution and quantum repeater protocols.
  • Substituting noble metals for high-index dielectrics has recently been proposed as an alternative strategy in nanophotonics to design broadband optical resonators and circumvent the ohmic losses of plasmonic materials. In this report, we demonstrate that subwavelength silicon nanoantennas can manipulate the photon emission dynamics of fluorescent molecules. In practice, it is showed that dielectric nanoantennas can both increase and decrease the local density of optical states (LDOS) at room temperature, a process that is inaccessible with noble metals at the nanoscale. Using scanning probe microscopy, we analyze quantitatively, in three dimensions, the near-field interaction between a 100 nm fluorescent nanosphere and silicon nanoantennas with diameters ranging between 170 nm and 250 nm. Associated to numerical simulations, these measurements indicate increased or decreased total spontaneous decay rates by up to 15 % and a gain in the collection efficiency of emitted photons by up to 85 %. Our study demonstrates the potential of silicon-based nanoantennas for the low-loss manipulation of solid-state emitters at the nanoscale and at room temperature.
  • Manipulating the spontaneous emission of a fluorescent emitter can be achieved by placing the emitter in a nanostructured environment. A privileged spot is occupied by plasmonic structures that provide a strong confinement of the electromagnetic field, which results in an enhancement of the emitter-environment interaction. While plasmonic nanostructures have been widely exploited to control the emission properties of single photon emitters, performing the coupling between quantum emitters with plasmons poses a huge challenge. In this Letter we report on a first crucial step towards this goal by the observation of correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single-plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead.
  • A bright photon source that combines high-fidelity entanglement, on-demand generation, high extraction efficiency, directional and coherent emission, as well as position control at the nanoscale is required for implementing ambitious schemes in quantum information processing, such as that of a quantum repeater. Still, all of these properties have not yet been achieved in a single device. Semiconductor quantum dots embedded in nanowire waveguides potentially satisfy all of these requirements; however, although theoretically predicted, entanglement has not yet been demonstrated for a nanowire quantum dot. Here, we demonstrate a bright and coherent source of strongly entangled photon pairs from a position controlled nanowire quantum dot with a fidelity as high as 0.859 +/- 0.006 and concurrence of 0.80 +/- 0.02. The two-photon quantum state is modified via the nanowire shape. Our new nanoscale entangled photon source can be integrated at desired positions in a quantum photonic circuit, single electron devices and light emitting diodes.
  • Single epitaxially-grown semiconductor quantum dots have great potential as single photon sources for photonic quantum technologies, though in practice devices often exhibit non-ideal behavior. Here, we demonstrate that amplitude modulation can improve the performance of quantum-dot-based sources. Starting with a bright source consisting of a single quantum dot in a fiber-coupled microdisk cavity, we use synchronized amplitude modulation to temporally filter the emitted light. We observe that the single photon purity, temporal overlap between successive emission events, and indistinguishability can be greatly improved with this technique. As this method can be applied to any triggered single photon source, independent of geometry and after device fabrication, it is a flexible approach to improve the performance of solid-state systems, which often suffer from excess dephasing and multi-photon background emission.
  • We show that quantum frequency conversion (QFC) can overcome the spectral distinguishability common to inhomogeneously broadened solid-state quantum emitters. QFC is implemented by combining single photons from an InAs quantum dot (QD) at 980 nm with a 1550 nm pump laser in a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide to generate photons at 600 nm with a signal-to-background ratio exceeding 100:1. Photon correlation and two-photon interference measurements confirm that both the single photon character and wavepacket interference of individual QD states are preserved during frequency conversion. Finally, we convert two spectrally separate QD transitions to the same wavelength in a single PPLN waveguide and show that the resulting field exhibits non-classical two-photon interference.