• It has been observed that many complex real-world networks have certain properties, such as a high clustering coefficient, a low diameter, and a power-law degree distribution. A network with a power-law degree distribution is known as scale-free network. In order to study these networks, various random graph models have been proposed, e.g. Preferential Attachment, Chung-Lu, or Hyperbolic. We look at the interplay between the power-law degree distribution and the run time of optimization techniques for well known combinatorial problems. We observe that on scale-free networks, simple evolutionary algorithms (EAs) quickly reach a constant-factor approximation ratio on common covering problems We prove that the single-objective (1+1)EA reaches a constant-factor approximation ratio on the Minimum Dominating Set problem, the Minimum Vertex Cover problem, the Minimum Connected Dominating Set problem, and the Maximum Independent Set problem in expected polynomial number of calls to the fitness function. Furthermore, we prove that the multi-objective GSEMO algorithm reaches a better approximation ratio than the (1+1)EA on those problems, within polynomial fitness evaluations.
  • Network creation games investigate complex networks from a game-theoretic point of view. Based on the original model by Fabrikant et al. [PODC'03] many variants have been introduced. However, almost all versions have the drawback that edges are treated uniformly, i.e. every edge has the same cost and that this common parameter heavily influences the outcomes and the analysis of these games. We propose and analyze simple and natural parameter-free network creation games with non-uniform edge cost. Our models are inspired by social networks where the cost of forming a link is proportional to the popularity of the targeted node. Besides results on the complexity of computing a best response and on various properties of the sequential versions, we show that the most general version of our model has constant Price of Anarchy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first proof of a constant Price of Anarchy for any network creation game.
  • Large real-world networks typically follow a power-law degree distribution. To study such networks, numerous random graph models have been proposed. However, real-world networks are not drawn at random. Therefore, Brach, Cygan, {\L}acki, and Sankowski [SODA 2016] introduced two natural deterministic conditions: (1) a power-law upper bound on the degree distribution (PLB-U) and (2) power-law neighborhoods, that is, the degree distribution of neighbors of each vertex is also upper bounded by a power law (PLB-N). They showed that many real-world networks satisfy both deterministic properties and exploit them to design faster algorithms for a number of classical graph problems. We complement the work of Brach et al. by showing that some well-studied random graph models exhibit both the mentioned PLB properties and additionally also a power-law lower bound on the degree distribution (PLB-L). All three properties hold with high probability for Chung-Lu Random Graphs and Geometric Inhomogeneous Random Graphs and almost surely for Hyperbolic Random Graphs. As a consequence, all results of Brach et al. also hold with high probability or almost surely for those random graph classes. In the second part of this work we study three classical NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems on PLB networks. It is known that on general graphs with maximum degree {\Delta}, a greedy algorithm, which chooses nodes in the order of their degree, only achieves an {\Omega}(ln {\Delta})-approximation for Minimum Vertex Cover and Minimum Dominating Set, and an {\Omega}({\Delta})-approximation for Maximum Independent Set. We prove that the PLB-U property suffices for the greedy approach to achieve a constant-factor approximation for all three problems. We also show that all three combinatorial optimization problems are APX-complete, even if all PLB-properties hold.
  • Robustness is one of the key properties of nowadays networks. However, robustness cannot be simply enforced by design or regulation since many important networks, most prominently the Internet, are not created and controlled by a central authority. Instead, Internet-like networks emerge from strategic decisions of many selfish agents. Interestingly, although lacking a coordinating authority, such naturally grown networks are surprisingly robust while at the same time having desirable properties like a small diameter. To investigate this phenomenon we present the first simple model for selfish network creation which explicitly incorporates agents striving for a central position in the network while at the same time protecting themselves against random edge-failure. We show that networks in our model are diverse and we prove the versatility of our model by adapting various properties and techniques from the non-robust versions which we then use for establishing bounds on the Price of Anarchy. Moreover, we analyze the computational hardness of finding best possible strategies and investigate the game dynamics of our model.
  • We study structural aspects of randomized parameterized computation. We introduce a new class ${\sf W[P]}$-${\sf PFPT}$ as a natural parameterized analogue of ${\sf PP}$. Our definition uses the machine based characterization of the parameterized complexity class ${\sf W[P]}$ obtained by Chen et.al [TCS 2005]. We translate most of the structural properties and characterizations of the class ${\sf PP}$ to the new class ${W[P]}$-${\sf PFPT}$. We study a parameterization of the polynomial identity testing problem based on the degree of the polynomial computed by the arithmetic circuit. We obtain a parameterized analogue of the well known Schwartz-Zippel lemma [Schwartz, JACM 80 and Zippel, EUROSAM 79]. Additionally, we introduce a parameterized variant of permanent, and prove its $\#W[1]$ completeness.