• The Graceful Tree Conjecture of Rosa from 1967 asserts that the vertices of each tree T of order n can be injectively labelled by using the numbers {1,2,...,n} in such a way that the absolute differences induced on the edges are pairwise distinct. We prove the following relaxation of the conjecture for each c>0 and for all n>n_0(c). Suppose that (i) the maximum degree of T is bounded by O(n/log n), and (ii) the vertex labels are chosen from the set {1,2,..., (1+c)n}. Then there is an injective labelling of V(T) such that the absolute differences on the edges are pairwise distinct. In particular, asymptotically almost all trees on n vertices admit such a labelling. As a consequence, for any such tree T we can pack (2+2c)n-1 copies of T into the complete graph of order (2+2c)n-1 cyclically. This proves an approximate version of the Ringel-Kotzig conjecture (which asserts the existence of a cyclic packing of 2n-1 copies of any T into the complete graph of order 2n-1) for these trees. The proof proceeds by showing that a certain very natural randomized algorithm produces a desired labelling with high probability.
  • We prove that the art gallery problem is equivalent under polynomial time reductions to deciding whether a system of polynomial equations over the real numbers has a solution. The art gallery problem is a classical problem in computational geometry. Given a simple polygon $P$ and an integer $k$, the goal is to decide if there exists a set $G$ of $k$ guards within $P$ such that every point $p\in P$ is seen by at least one guard $g\in G$. Each guard corresponds to a point in the polygon $P$, and we say that a guard $g$ sees a point $p$ if the line segment $pg$ is contained in $P$. The art gallery problem has stimulated extensive research in geometry and in algorithms. However, the complexity status of the art gallery problem has not been resolved. It has long been known that the problem is $\text{NP}$-hard, but no one has been able to show that it lies in $\text{NP}$. Recently, the computational geometry community became more aware of the complexity class $\exists \mathbb{R}$. The class $\exists \mathbb{R}$ consists of problems that can be reduced in polynomial time to the problem of deciding whether a system of polynomial equations with integer coefficients and any number of real variables has a solution. It can be easily seen that $\text{NP}\subseteq \exists \mathbb{R}$. We prove that the art gallery problem is $\exists \mathbb{R}$-complete, implying that (1) any system of polynomial equations over the real numbers can be encoded as an instance of the art gallery problem, and (2) the art gallery problem is not in the complexity class $\text{NP}$ unless $\text{NP}=\exists \mathbb{R}$. As a corollary of our construction, we prove that for any real algebraic number $\alpha$ there is an instance of the art gallery problem where one of the coordinates of the guards equals $\alpha$ in any guard set of minimum cardinality. That rules out many geometric approaches to the problem.
  • We consider very natural "fence enclosure" problems studied by Capoyleas, Rote, and Woeginger and Arkin, Khuller, and Mitchell in the early 90s. Given a set $S$ of $n$ points in the plane, we aim at finding a set of closed curves such that (1) each point is enclosed by a curve and (2) the total length of the curves is minimized. We consider two main variants. In the first variant, we pay a unit cost per curve in addition to the total length of the curves. An equivalent formulation of this version is that we have to enclose $n$ unit disks, paying only the total length of the enclosing curves. In the other variant, we are allowed to use at most $k$ closed curves and pay no cost per curve. For the variant with at most $k$ closed curves, we present an algorithm that is polynomial in both $n$ and $k$. For the variant with unit cost per curve, or unit disks, we present a near-linear time algorithm. Capoyleas, Rote, and Woeginger solved the problem with at most $k$ curves in $n^{O(k)}$ time. Arkin, Khuller, and Mitchell used this to solve the unit cost per curve version in exponential time. At the time, they conjectured that the problem with $k$ curves is NP-hard for general $k$. Our polynomial time algorithm refutes this unless P equals NP.
  • We present an $(1+\varepsilon)$-approximation algorithm with quasi-polynomial running time for computing the maximum weight independent set of polygons out of a given set of polygons in the plane (specifically, the running time is $n^{O( \mathrm{poly}( \log n, 1/\varepsilon))}$). Contrasting this, the best known polynomial time algorithm for the problem has an approximation ratio of~$n^{\varepsilon}$. Surprisingly, we can extend the algorithm to the problem of computing the maximum weight subset of the given set of polygons whose intersection graph fulfills some sparsity condition. For example, we show that one can approximate the maximum weight subset of polygons, such that the intersection graph of the subset is planar or does not contain a cycle of length $4$ (i.e., $K_{2,2}$). Our algorithm relies on a recursive partitioning scheme, whose backbone is the existence of balanced cuts with small complexity that intersect polygons from the optimal solution of a small total weight. For the case of large axis-parallel rectangles, we provide a polynomial time $(1+\varepsilon)$-approximation for the maximum weight independent set. Specifically, we consider the problem where each rectangle has one edge whose length is at least a constant fraction of the length of the corresponding edge of the bounding box of all the input elements. This is now the most general case for which a PTAS is known, and it requires a new and involved partitioning scheme, which should be of independent interest.
  • In this paper we study the art gallery problem, which is one of the fundamental problems in computational geometry. The objective is to place a minimum number of guards inside a simple polygon such that the guards together can see the whole polygon. We say that a guard at position $x$ sees a point $y$ if the line segment $xy$ is fully contained in the polygon. Despite an extensive study of the art gallery problem, it remained an open question whether there are polygons given by integer coordinates that require guard positions with irrational coordinates in any optimal solution. We give a positive answer to this question by constructing a monotone polygon with integer coordinates that can be guarded by three guards only when we allow to place the guards at points with irrational coordinates. Otherwise, four guards are needed. By extending this example, we show that for every $n$, there is polygon which can be guarded by $3n$ guards with irrational coordinates but need $4n$ guards if the coordinates have to be rational. Subsequently, we show that there are rectilinear polygons given by integer coordinates that require guards with irrational coordinates in any optimal solution.
  • Strip packing is a classical packing problem, where the goal is to pack a set of rectangular objects into a strip of a given width, while minimizing the total height of the packing. The problem has multiple applications, e.g. in scheduling and stock-cutting, and has been studied extensively. When the dimensions of objects are allowed to be exponential in the total input size, it is known that the problem cannot be approximated within a factor better than $3/2$, unless $\mathrm{P}=\mathrm{NP}$. However, there was no corresponding lower bound for polynomially bounded input data. In fact, Nadiradze and Wiese [SODA 2016] have recently proposed a $(1.4 + \epsilon)$ approximation algorithm for this variant, thus showing that strip packing with polynomially bounded data can be approximated better than when exponentially large values in the input data are allowed. Their result has subsequently been improved to a $(4/3 + \epsilon)$ approximation by two independent research groups [FSTTCS 2016, arXiv:1610.04430]. This raises a question whether strip packing with polynomially bounded input data admits a quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, as is the case for related two-dimensional packing problems like maximum independent set of rectangles or two-dimensional knapsack. In this paper we answer this question in negative by proving that it is NP-hard to approximate strip packing within a factor better than $12/11$, even when admitting only polynomially bounded input data. In particular, this shows that the strip packing problem admits no quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, unless $\mathrm{NP} \subseteq \mathrm{DTIME}(2^{\mathrm{polylog}(n)})$.
  • In this paper we investigate the colorful components framework, motivated by applications emerging from comparative genomics. The general goal is to remove a collection of edges from an undirected vertex-colored graph $G$ such that in the resulting graph $G'$ all the connected components are colorful (i.e., any two vertices of the same color belong to different connected components). We want $G'$ to optimize an objective function, the selection of this function being specific to each problem in the framework. We analyze three objective functions, and thus, three different problems, which are believed to be relevant for the biological applications: minimizing the number of singleton vertices, maximizing the number of edges in the transitive closure, and minimizing the number of connected components. Our main result is a polynomial time algorithm for the first problem. This result disproves the conjecture of Zheng et al. that the problem is $ NP$-hard (assuming $P \neq NP$). Then, we show that the second problem is $ APX$-hard, thus proving and strengthening the conjecture of Zheng et al. that the problem is $ NP$-hard. Finally, we show that the third problem does not admit polynomial time approximation within a factor of $|V|^{1/14 - \epsilon}$ for any $\epsilon > 0$, assuming $P \neq NP$ (or within a factor of $|V|^{1/2 - \epsilon}$, assuming $ZPP \neq NP$).
  • The Maximum Weight Independent Set of Polygons problem is a fundamental problem in computational geometry. Given a set of weighted polygons in the 2-dimensional plane, the goal is to find a set of pairwise non-overlapping polygons with maximum total weight. Due to its wide range of applications, the MWISP problem and its special cases have been extensively studied both in the approximation algorithms and the computational geometry community. Despite a lot of research, its general case is not well-understood. Currently the best known polynomial time algorithm achieves an approximation ratio of n^(epsilon) [Fox and Pach, SODA 2011], and it is not even clear whether the problem is APX-hard. We present a (1+epsilon)-approximation algorithm, assuming that each polygon in the input has at most a polylogarithmic number of vertices. Our algorithm has quasi-polynomial running time. We use a recently introduced framework for approximating maximum weight independent set in geometric intersection graphs. The framework has been used to construct a QPTAS in the much simpler case of axis-parallel rectangles. We extend it in two ways, to adapt it to our much more general setting. First, we show that its technical core can be reduced to the case when all input polygons are triangles. Secondly, we replace its key technical ingredient which is a method to partition the plane using only few edges such that the objects stemming from the optimal solution are evenly distributed among the resulting faces and each object is intersected only a few times. Our new procedure for this task is not more complex than the original one, and it can handle the arising difficulties due to the arbitrary angles of the polygons. Note that already this obstacle makes the known analysis for the above framework fail. Also, in general it is not well understood how to handle this difficulty by efficient approximation algorithms.
  • In the Maximum Weight Independent Set of Rectangles (MWISR) problem we are given a set of n axis-parallel rectangles in the 2D-plane, and the goal is to select a maximum weight subset of pairwise non-overlapping rectangles. Due to many applications, e.g. in data mining, map labeling and admission control, the problem has received a lot of attention by various research communities. We present the first (1+epsilon)-approximation algorithm for the MWISR problem with quasi-polynomial running time 2^{poly(log n/epsilon)}. In contrast, the best known polynomial time approximation algorithms for the problem achieve superconstant approximation ratios of O(log log n) (unweighted case) and O(log n / log log n) (weighted case). Key to our results is a new geometric dynamic program which recursively subdivides the plane into polygons of bounded complexity. We provide the technical tools that are needed to analyze its performance. In particular, we present a method of partitioning the plane into small and simple areas such that the rectangles of an optimal solution are intersected in a very controlled manner. Together with a novel application of the weighted planar graph separator theorem due to Arora et al. this allows us to upper bound our approximation ratio by (1+epsilon). Our dynamic program is very general and we believe that it will be useful for other settings. In particular, we show that, when parametrized properly, it provides a polynomial time (1+epsilon)-approximation for the special case of the MWISR problem when each rectangle is relatively large in at least one dimension. Key to this analysis is a method to tile the plane in order to approximately describe the topology of these rectangles in an optimal solution. This technique might be a useful insight to design better polynomial time approximation algorithms or even a PTAS for the MWISR problem.
  • We prove that if two graphs of girth at least 6 have isomorphic squares, then the graphs themselves are isomorphic. This is the best possible extension of the results of Ross and Harary on trees and the results of Farzad et al. on graphs of girth at least 7. We also make a remark on reconstruction of graphs from their higher powers.
  • We study the problem of recognizing graph powers and computing roots of graphs. We provide a polynomial time recognition algorithm for r-th powers of graphs of girth at least 2r+3, thus improving a bound conjectured by Farzad et al. (STACS 2009). Our algorithm also finds all r-th roots of a given graph that have girth at least 2r+3 and no degree one vertices, which is a step towards a recent conjecture of Levenshtein that such root should be unique. On the negative side, we prove that recognition becomes an NP-complete problem when the bound on girth is about twice smaller. Similar results have so far only been attempted for r=2,3.
  • Let P be a set of n points in the Euclidean plane and let O be the origin point in the plane. In the k-tour cover problem (called frequently the capacitated vehicle routing problem), the goal is to minimize the total length of tours that cover all points in P, such that each tour starts and ends in O and covers at most k points from P. The k-tour cover problem is known to be NP-hard. It is also known to admit constant factor approximation algorithms for all values of k and even a polynomial-time approximation scheme (PTAS) for small values of k, i.e., k=O(log n / log log n). We significantly enlarge the set of values of k for which a PTAS is provable. We present a new PTAS for all values of k <= 2^{log^{\delta}n}, where \delta = \delta(\epsilon). The main technical result proved in the paper is a novel reduction of the k-tour cover problem with a set of n points to a small set of instances of the problem, each with O((k/\epsilon)^O(1)) points.