• We present results from a medium-resolution (R ~ 2, 000) spectroscopic follow-up campaign of 1,694 bright (V < 13.5), very metal-poor star candidates from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). Initial selection of the low-metallicity targets was based on the stellar parameters published in RAVE Data Releases 4 and 5. Follow-up was accomplished with the Gemini-N and Gemini-S, the ESO/NTT, the KPNO/Mayall, and the SOAR telescopes. The wavelength coverage for most of the observed spectra allows for the determination of carbon and {\alpha}-element abundances, which are crucial for con- sidering the nature and frequency of the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in this sample. We find that 88% of the observed stars have [Fe/H] <= -1.0, 61% have [Fe/H] <= -2.0, and 3% have [Fe/H] <= -3.0 (with four stars at [Fe/H] <= -3.5). There are 306 CEMP star candidates in this sample, and we identify 169 CEMP Group I, 131 CEMP Group II, and 6 CEMP Group III stars from the A(C) vs. [Fe/H] diagram. Inspection of the [alpha/C] abundance ratios reveals that five of the CEMP Group II stars can be classified as "mono-enriched second-generation" stars. Gaia DR1 matches were found for 734 stars, and we show that transverse velocities can be used as a confirmatory selection criteria for low-metallicity candidates. Selected stars from our validated list are being followed-up with high-resolution spectroscopy, to reveal their full chemical abundance patterns for further studies.
  • The study of the chemical abundances of metal-poor stars in dwarf galaxies provides a venue to constrain paradigms of chemical enrichment and galaxy formation. Here we present metallicity and carbon abundance measurements of 100 stars in Sculptor from medium-resolution (R ~ 2000) spectra taken with the Magellan/Michigan Fiber System mounted on the Magellan-Clay 6.5m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We identify 24 extremely metal-poor star candidates ([Fe/H] < -3.0) and 21 carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star candidates. Eight carbon-enhanced stars are classified with at least 2$\sigma$ confidence and five are confirmed as such with follow-up R~6000 observations using the Magellan Echellette Spectrograph on the Magellan-Baade 6.5m telescope. We measure a CEMP fraction of 36% for stars below [Fe/H] = -3.0, indicating that the prevalence of carbon-enhanced stars in Sculptor is similar to that of the halo (~43%) after excluding likely CEMP-s and CEMP-r/s stars from our sample. However, we do not detect that any CEMP stars are strongly enhanced in carbon (e.g., [C/Fe] > 1.0). The existence of a large number of CEMP stars both in the halo and in Sculptor suggests that some halo CEMP stars may have originated from accreted early analogs of dwarf galaxies.
  • We present chemical abundance measurements for seven stars with metallicities ranging from [Fe/H] = $-$3.3 to [Fe/H] = $-$2.4 in the Tucana II ultra-faint dwarf galaxy (UFD), based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan-Clay Telescope. For three stars, we present detailed chemical abundances for the first time. Of those, two stars are newly discovered members of Tucana II and were selected as probable members from deep narrow band photometry of the Tucana II UFD taken with the SkyMapper telescope. This result demonstrates the potential for photometrically identifying members of dwarf galaxy systems based on chemical composition. One new star was selected from the membership catalog of Walker et al. (2016). The other four stars in our sample have been re-analyzed, following additional observations. Overall, six stars have chemical abundances that are characteristic of the UFD stellar population. The seventh star shows chemical abundances that are discrepant from the other Tucana II members and an atypical, higher strontium abundance than what is expected for typical UFD stars. While unlikely, its strontium abundance raises the possibility that it may be a foreground metal-poor halo star with the same systemic velocity as Tucana II. If we were to exclude this star, Tucana II would satisfy the criteria to be a surviving first galaxy. Otherwise, this star implies that Tucana II has likely experienced somewhat extended chemical evolution.
  • The recent detection of a binary neutron star merger and the clear evidence for the decay of radioactive material observed in this event have, after sixty years of effort, provided an astrophysical site for the rapid neutron-capture ($r$-) process which is responsible for the production of the heaviest elements in our Universe. However, observations of metal-poor stars with highly-enhanced $r$-process elements have revealed abundance patterns suggesting that multiple sites may be involved. To address this issue, and to advance our understanding of the $r$-process, we have initiated an extensive search for bright ($V < 13.5$), very metal-poor ($\mathrm{[Fe/H]} < -2$) stars in the Milky Way halo exhibiting strongly-enhanced $r$-process signatures. This paper presents the first sample collected in the Southern Hemisphere, using the echelle spectrograph on du Pont 2.5m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We have observed and analyzed 107 stars with $-3.13 < \mathrm{[Fe/H]} < -0.79$. Of those, 12 stars are strongly enhanced in heavy $r$-process elements ($r$-II), 42 stars show moderate enhancements of heavy $r$-process material ($r$-I), and 20 stars exhibit low abundances of the heavy $r$-process elements and higher abundances of the light $r$-process elements relative to the heavy ones (limited-$r$). This search is more successful at finding $r$-process-enhanced stars compared to previous searches, primarily due to a refined target selection procedure that focuses on red giants.
  • Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Milky Way (MW) allow us to infer the properties of their progenitors by comparing their chemical composition to the metal yields of the first supernovae. This method is most powerful when applied to mono-enriched stars, i.e. stars that formed from gas that was enriched by only one previous supernova. We present a novel diagnostic to identify this subclass of EMP stars. We model the first generations of star formation semi-analytically, based on dark matter halo merger trees that yield MW-like halos at the present day. Radiative and chemical feedback are included self-consistently and we trace all elements up to zinc. Mono-enriched stars account for only $\sim 1\%$ of second generation stars in our fiducial model and we provide an analytical formula for this probability. We also present a novel analytical diagnostic to identify mono-enriched stars, based on the metal yields of the first supernovae. This new diagnostic allows us to derive our main results independently from the specific assumptions made regarding Pop III star formation, and we apply it to a set of observed EMP stars to demonstrate its strengths and limitations. Our results may provide selection criteria for current and future surveys and therefore contribute to a deeper understanding of EMP stars and their progenitors.
  • The smallest satellites of the Milky Way ceased forming stars during the epoch of reionization and thus provide archaeological access to galaxy formation at $z>6$. Numerical studies of these ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) require expensive cosmological simulations with high mass resolution that are carried out down to $z=0$. However, if we are able to statistically identify UFD host progenitors at high redshifts \emph{with relatively high probabilities}, we can avoid this high computational cost. To find such candidates, we analyze the merger trees of Milky Way type halos from the high-resolution ${\it Caterpillar}$ suite of dark matter only simulations. Satellite UFD hosts at $z=0 $ are identified based on four different abundance matching (AM) techniques. All the halos at high redshifts are traced forward in time in order to compute the probability of surviving as satellite UFDs today. Our results show that selecting potential UFD progenitors based solely on their mass at z=12 (8) results in a 10\% (20\%) chance of obtaining a surviving UFD at $z=0$ in three of the AM techniques we adopted. We find that the progenitors of surviving satellite UFDs have lower virial ratios ($\eta$), and are preferentially located at large distances from the main MW progenitor, while they show no correlation with concentration parameter. Halos with favorable locations and virial ratios are $\approx 3$ times more likely to survive as satellite UFD candidates at $z=0.$
  • The ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II was enriched by a rare and prolific r-process event, such as a neutron star merger. To investigate the nature of this event, we present high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectroscopy of the brightest star in this galaxy. The high signal-to-noise allows us to determine the abundances of 41 elements, including the radioactive actinide element Th and first ever detections of third r-process peak elements (Os and Ir) in a star outside the Milky Way. The observed neutron-capture element abundances closely match the solar r-process component, except for the first r-process peak which is significantly lower than solar but matches other r-process enhanced stars. The ratio of first peak to heavier r-process elements implies the r-process site produces roughly equal masses of high and low electron fraction ejecta, within a factor of 2. We compare the detailed abundance pattern to predictions from nucleosynthesis calculations of neutron star mergers and magneto-rotationally driven jet supernovae, finding that nuclear physics uncertainties dominate over astrophysical uncertainties. We measure $\log\mbox{Th/Eu} = -0.84 \pm 0.06\,\text{(stat)} \pm 0.22\,\text{(sys)}$, somewhat lower than all previous Th/Eu observations. The youngest age we derive from this ratio is $21.7 \pm 2.8\,\text{(stat)} \pm 10.3\,\text{(sys)}$ Gyr, indicating that current initial production ratios do not well describe the r-process event in Reticulum II. The abundance of light elements up to Zn are consistent with extremely metal-poor Milky Way halo stars. They may eventually provide a way to distinguish between neutron star mergers and magneto-rotationally driven jet supernovae, but this would require more detailed knowledge of the chemical evolution of Reticulum II.
  • The rapid neutron-capture process needed to build up many of the elements heavier than iron seems to take place primarily in neutron-star mergers, not supernova explosions.
  • The search for metal-free stars has so far been unsuccessful, proving that if there are surviving stars from the first generation, they are rare, they have been polluted, or we have been looking in the wrong place. To predict the likely location of Population~III (Pop~III) survivors, we semi-analytically model early star formation in progenitors of Milky Way-like galaxies and their environments. We base our model on merger trees from the high-resolution dark matter only simulation suite \textit{Caterpillar}. Radiative and chemical feedback are taken into account self-consistently, based on the spatial distribution of the haloes. Our results are consistent with the non-detection of Pop III survivors in the Milky Way today. We find that possible surviving Population III stars are more common in Milky Way satellites than in the main Galaxy. In particular, low mass Milky Way satellites contain a much larger fraction of Pop~III stars than the Milky Way. Such nearby, low mass Milky Way satellites are promising targets for future attempts to find Pop~III survivors, especially for high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations. We provide the probabilities for finding a Pop~III survivor in the red giant branch phase for all known Milky Way satellites to guide future observations.
  • We present new ultra-metal-poor (UMP) stars parameters with [Fe/H]<-4.0 based on line-by-line non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) abundances using an up-to-date iron model atom with a new recipe for non-elastic hydrogen collision rates. We study the departures from LTE in their atmospheric parameter and show that they can grow up to ~1.0 dex in [Fe/H], 150K in Teff and 0.5 dex in log g toward the lowest metallicities. Accurate NLTE atmospheric stellar parameters, in particular [Fe/H] being signifcantly higher, are the first step to eventually providing full NLTE abundance patterns that can be compared with Population III supernova nucleosynthesis yields to derive properties of the first stars. Overall, this maximizes the potential of these likely second-generation stars to investigate the early universe and how the chemical elements were formed.
  • Recent discovery of many dwarf satellite galaxies in the direction of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC) provokes questions of their origins, and what they can reveal about galaxy evolution theory. Here, we predict the satellite stellar mass function of Magellanic Cloud-mass host galaxies using abundance matching and reionization models applied to the \textit{Caterpillar} simulations. Specifically focusing on the volume within $50$~kpc of the LMC, we predict a mean of 4-8 satellites with stellar mass $M_* > 10^4\, \mathrm{M_\odot}$, and 3-4 satellites with $80 < M_* \leq 3000\, \mathrm{M_\odot}$. Surprisingly, all $12$ currently known satellite candidates have stellar masses of $80 < M_* \leq 3000\, \mathrm{M_\odot}$. Reconciling the dearth of large satellites and profusion of small satellites is challenging and may require a combination of a major modification of the \mstarmhalo relationship (steep, but with an abrupt flattening at $10^3\, \mathrm{M_\odot}$), late reionization for the Local Group ($z_{\rm{reion}} \lesssim 9$ preferred), and/or strong tidal stripping. We can more robustly predict that $\sim 53\%$ of satellites within this volume were accreted together with the LMC and SMC, and $\sim 47\%$ were only ever Milky Way satellites. Observing satellites of isolated LMC-sized field galaxies is essential to placing the LMC in context, and to better constrain the \mstarmhalo relationship. Modeling known LMC-sized galaxies within $8$ Mpc, we predict 1-6 (2-12) satellites with $M_* > 10^5\, \mathrm{M_\odot}$ ($M_* > 10^4\, \mathrm{M_\odot}$) within the virial volume of each, and 1-3 (1-7) within a single $1.5^{\circ}$ diameter field of view, making their discovery likely.
  • A recent surge in the discovery of new ultrafaint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way has inspired the idea of searching for faint satellites, $10^3\, \mathrm{M_{\odot}} < M_* < 10^6\, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$, around less massive field galaxies in the Local Group. Such satellites would be subject to weaker environmental influences than Milky Way satellites, and could lead to new insights on low mass galaxy formation. In this paper, we predict the number of luminous satellites expected around field dwarf galaxies by applying several abundance matching models and a reionization model to the dark-matter only \textit{Caterpillar} simulation suite. For three of the four abundance matching models used, we find a $>99\%$ chance that at least one satellite with stellar mass $M_*> 10^5\, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$ exists around the combined five Local Group field dwarf galaxies with the largest stellar mass. When considering satellites with $M_*> 10^4\, \mathrm{M_{\odot}}$, we predict a combined $5-25$ satellites for the five largest field dwarfs, and $10-50$ for the whole Local Group field dwarf population. Because of the relatively small number of predicted dwarfs, and their extended spatial distribution, a large fraction each Local Group dwarf's virial volume will need to be surveyed to guarantee discoveries. We compute the predicted number of satellites in a given field of view of specific Local Group galaxies, as a function of minimum satellite luminosity, and explicitly obtain such values for the Solitary Local dwarfs survey. Uncertainties in abundance matching and reionization models are large, implying that comprehensive searches could lead to refinements of both models.
  • We report the discovery of RAVE J203843.2-002333, a bright (V = 12.73), very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.91), r-process-enhanced ([Eu/Fe] = +1.64 and [Ba/Eu] = -0.81) star selected from the RAVE survey. This star was identified as a metal-poor candidate based on its medium-resolution (R ~ 1,600) spectrum obtained with the KPNO/Mayall Telescope, and followed-up with high-resolution (R ~ 66,000) spectroscopy with the Magellan/Clay Telescope, allowing for the determination of elemental abundances for 24 neutron-capture elements, including thorium and uranium. RAVE J2038-0023 is only the fourth metal-poor star with a clearly measured U abundance. The derived chemical-abundance pattern exhibits good agreement with those of other known highly r-process-enhanced stars, and evidence in hand suggests that it is not an actinide-boost star. Age estimates were calculated using Th/X and U/X abundance ratios, yielding a mean age of 13.0 +/- 1.1 Gyr.
  • We use 30 high-resolution dark matter halos of the $Caterpillar$ simulation suite to probe the first stars and galaxies of Milky Way-mass systems. We quantify the environment of the high-$z$ progenitors of the Milky Way and connect them to the properties of the host and satellites today. We identify the formation sites of the first generation of Population III (Pop III) stars ($z$ ~ 25) and first galaxies ($z$ ~ 22) with several different models based on a minimum halo mass including a simple model for Lyman-Werner feedback. Through this method we find approximately 23,000 $\pm$ 5,000 Pop III potentially star-forming sites per Milky Way-mass host, though this number is drastically reduced to ~550 star-forming sites when Lyman-Werner feedback is included, as it has critical effects at these length scales. The majority of these halos identified form in isolation (96% at $z$ = 15) and are not subject to external enrichment by neighboring halos (median separation ~1 pkpc at $z$ = 15), though half merge with a system larger than themselves within 1.5 Gyrs. Approximately 55% of the entire population has merged into the host halo by $z$ = 0. Using particle tagging, we additionally trace the Pop III remnant population to $z$ = 0 and find an order of magnitude scatter in their number density at small (i.e. r $<$ 5 kpc) and large (i.e. r $>$ 50 kpc) galactocentric radii at $z$ = 0. Using our large number of realizations, we provide fitting functions for determining the number of progenitor minihalo and atomic cooling halo systems that present-day dwarf galaxies and the Magellanic cloud system might have accreted since their formation. We demonstrate that observed dwarf galaxies with stellar masses below 10$^{4.6}$ M$_{\odot}$ are unlikely to have merged with any other star-forming systems.
  • We obtain estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters for a previously published sample of 1777 relatively bright (9 < B < 14) metal-poor candidates from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. The original Frebel et al. analysis of these stars was only able to derive estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] for a subset of the sample, due to limitations in the methodology then available. A new spectroscopic analysis pipeline has been used to obtain estimates of Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for almost the entire dataset. This sample is very local - about 90% of the stars are located within 0.5 kpc of the Sun. We consider the chemodynamical properties of these stars in concert with a similarly local sample of stars from a recent analysis of the Bidelman & MacConnell 'weak-metal' candidates by Beers et al. We use this combined sample to identify possible members of the suggested halo stream of stars by Helmi et al. and Chiba & Beers, as well as stars that may be associated with stripped debris from the putative parent dwarf of the globular cluster Omega Centauri, suggested to exist by previous authors. We identify a clear increase in the cumulative frequency of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with declining metallicity, as well as an increase in the fraction of CEMP stars with distance from the Galactic plane, consistent with previous results. We also identify a relatively large number of CEMP stars with kinematics consistent with the metal-weak thick-disk population, with possible implications for its origin.
  • Pegasus III (Peg III) is one of the few known ultra-faint stellar systems in the outer halo of the Milky Way. We present the results from a follow-up campaign with Magellan/IMACS and Keck/DEIMOS. Deep stellar photometry down to $r_0\approx 25$ mag at 50% completeness level has allowed accurate measurements of its photometric and structural properties. The color-magnitude diagram of Peg III confirms that the stellar system is well described by an old ($\gtrsim12$ Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]$\lesssim-2.0$ dex) stellar population at a heliocentric distance of $215\pm12$ kpc. The revised half-light radius $r_{h}=53\pm14$ pc, ellipticity $\epsilon=0.38^{+0.22}_{-0.38}$, and total luminosity $M_{V}=-3.4\pm0.4$ are in good agreement with the values quoted in our previous paper. We further report on the spectroscopic identification of seven, possibly eight member stars of Peg III. The Ca II triplet lines of the brightest member stars indicate that Peg III contains stars with metallicity as low as [Fe/H]=$-2.55\pm0.15$ dex. Peg III has a systemic velocity of $-222.9 \pm 2.6$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $5.4^{+3.0}_{-2.5}$ km s$^{-1}$. The inferred dynamical mass within the half-light radius is $1.4^{+3.0}_{-1.1} \times 10^6\rm{M_{\odot}}$ and the mass-to-light ratio $\rm{M/L}$$_{V} = 1470^{+5660}_{-1240}$ $\rm{M_{\odot}/L_{\odot}}$, providing further evidence that Peg III is a dwarf galaxy satellite. We find that Peg III and another distant dwarf satellite Pisces II lie relatively close to each other ($\Delta d_{spatial}=43\pm19$ kpc) and share similar radial velocities in the Galactic standard-of-rest frame ($\Delta v_{GSR}=12.3\pm3.7$ km s$^{-1}$). This suggests that they may share a common origin.
  • Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the (r)apid and (s)low neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of chemical abundance trends in old Milky Way halo stars suggested continual r-process production, in sites like core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favors r-process production mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a europium abundance plateau in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption of no gas accretion into the dwarf galaxies. Cosmologically motivated gas accretion favors continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultra-faint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those of other old stars. Here, we report that seven of nine stars in Reticulum II observed with high-resolution spectroscopy show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern above barium. The enhancement in this "r-process galaxy" is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sites, such as neutron star mergers.
  • We investigate the effects of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) on the tidal stripping and evaporation of satellite galaxies in a Milky Way-like host. We use a suite of five zoom-in, dark-matter-only simulations, two with velocity-independent SIDM cross sections, two with velocity-dependent SIDM cross sections, and one cold dark matter simulation for comparison. After carefully assigning stellar mass to satellites at infall, we find that stars are stripped at a higher rate in SIDM than in CDM. In contrast, the total bound dark matter mass loss rate is minimally affected, with subhalo evaporation having negligible effects on satellites for viable SIDM models. Centrally located stars in SIDM haloes disperse out to larger radii as cores grow. Consequently, the half-light radius of satellites increases, stars become more vulnerable to tidal stripping, and the stellar mass function is suppressed. We find that the ratio of core radius to tidal radius accurately predicts the relative strength of enhanced SIDM stellar stripping. Velocity-independent SIDM models show a modest increase in the stellar stripping effect with satellite mass, whereas velocity-dependent SIDM models show a large increase in this effect towards lower masses, making observations of ultra-faint dwarfs prime targets for distinguishing between and constraining SIDM models. Due to small cores in the largest satellites of velocity-dependent SIDM, no identifiable imprint is left on the all-sky properties of the stellar halo. While our results focus on SIDM, the main physical mechanism of enhanced tidal stripping of stars apply similarly to satellites with cores formed via other means.
  • We present the first detailed chemical abundance study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Tucana II based on high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of four red giant stars. The metallicity of these stars ranges from [Fe/H] = -3.2 to -2.6, and all stars are low in neutron-capture abundances ([Sr/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] < -1). However, a number of anomalous chemical signatures are present. Three stars are carbon-enhanced, including the most metal-rich star. This star ([Fe/H]=-2.6) shows [Na,$\alpha$,Sc/Fe] < 0, suggesting an extended star formation history with contributions from AGB stars and Type Ia supernovae. The other carbon-enhanced stars have [Fe/H] < -3 and may be consistent with enrichment by faint supernovae, if such supernovae can produce neutron-capture elements. A fourth star with [Fe/H] = -3 is carbon-normal, and exhibits distinct light element abundance ratios from the carbon-enhanced stars. The carbon-normal star implies that at least two distinct nucleosynthesis sources, both possibly associated with Population III stars, contributed to the early chemical enrichment of this galaxy. Despite its very low luminosity, Tucana II shows a diversity of chemical signatures that preclude it from being a simple "one-shot" first galaxy, but still provide a window to star and galaxy formation in the early universe.
  • We report on the first high-resolution spectroscopic analysis of HE0020-1741, a bright (V=12.9), ultra metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -4.1), carbon-enhanced ([C/Fe] = +1.7) star selected from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. This star exhibits low abundances of neutron-capture elements ([Ba/Fe] = -1.1), and an absolute carbon abundance A(C) = 6.1; based on either criterion, HE0020-1741 is sub-classified as a CEMP-no star. We show that the light-element abundance pattern of HE0020-1741 is consistent with predicted yields from a massive (M = 21.5 Mo), primordial composition, supernova (SN) progenitor. We also compare the abundance patterns of other ultra metal-poor stars from the literature with available measures of C, N, Na, Mg, and Fe abundances with an extensive grid of SN models (covering the mass range 10 Mo - 100 Mo), in order to probe the nature of their likely stellar progenitors. Our results suggest that at least two classes of progenitors are required at [Fe/H] < -4.0, as the abundance patterns for more than half of the sample studied in this work (7 out of 12 stars) cannot be easily reproduced by the predicted yields.
  • We present chemical abundances derived from high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of the nine brightest known red giant members of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II. These stars span the full metallicity range of Ret II (-3.5 < [Fe/H] < -2). Seven of the nine stars have extremely high levels of r-process material ([Eu/Fe]~1.7), in contrast to the extremely low neutron-capture element abundances found in every other ultra-faint dwarf galaxy studied to date. The other two stars are the most metal-poor stars in the system ([Fe/H] < -3), and they have neutron-capture element abundance limits similar to those in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm that the relative abundances of Sr, Y, and Zr in these stars are similar to those found in r-process halo stars but ~0.5 dex lower than the solar r-process pattern. If the universal r-process pattern extends to those elements, the stars in Ret II display the least contaminated known r-process pattern. The abundances of lighter elements up to the iron peak are otherwise similar to abundances of stars in the halo and in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. However, the scatter in abundance ratios is large enough to suggest that inhomogeneous metal mixing is required to explain the chemical evolution of this galaxy. The presence of low amounts of neutron-capture elements in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies may imply the existence of additional r-process sites besides the source of r-process elements in Ret II. Galaxies like Ret II may be the original birth sites of r-process enhanced stars now found in the halo.
  • We present chemical abundance measurements of two metal-poor red giant stars in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Bootes I, based on Magellan/MIKE high-resolution spectra. For Boo I-980, with [Fe/H]=-3.1, we present the first elemental abundance measurements while Boo I-127, with [Fe/H]=-2.0, shows abundances in good agreement with previous measurements. Light and iron-peak element abundance ratios in the two Bootes I stars, as well as those of most other Boootes I members, collected from the literature, closely resemble those of regular metal-poor halo stars. Neutron-capture element abundances Sr and Ba are systematically lower than the main halo trend, and also show a significant abundance spread. Overall, this is similar to what has been found for other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We apply corrections to the carbon abundances (commensurate with stellar evolutionary status) of the entire sample and find 21% of stars to be carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, compared to 13% without using the carbon correction. We reassess the metallicity distribution functions (MDF) for the CEMP stars and non-CEMP stars, and confirm earlier claims that CEMP stars might belong to a different, earlier population. Applying a set of abundance criteria to test to what extent Bootes I could be a surviving first galaxy suggests that it is one of the earliest assembled systems that perhaps received gas from accretion from other clouds in the system, or from swallowing a first galaxy or building block type object. This resulted in the two stellar populations observable today.
  • Cosmological models predict the oldest stars in the Galaxy should be found closest to the centre of the potential well, in the bulge. The EMBLA Survey successfully searched for these old, metal-poor stars by making use of the distinctive SkyMapper photometric filters to discover candidate metal-poor stars in the bulge. Their metal-poor nature was then confirmed using the AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. Here we present an abundance analysis of 10 bulge stars with -2.8<[Fe/H]<-1.7 from MIKE/Magellan observations, in total determining the abundances of 22 elements. Combining these results with our previous high-resolution data taken as part of the Gaia-ESO Survey, we have started to put together a picture of the chemical and kinematic nature of the most metal-poor stars in the bulge. The currently available kinematic data is consistent with the stars belonging to the bulge, although more accurate measurements are needed to constrain the stars' orbits. The chemistry of these bulge stars deviates from that found in halo stars of the same metallicity. Two notable differences are the absence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor bulge stars, and the alpha-element abundances exhibit a large intrinsic scatter and include stars which are underabundant in these typically enhanced elements.
  • We present high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of the four brightest confirmed red giant stars in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Bootes II (Boo II). These stars all inhabit the metal-poor tail of the Boo II metallicity distribution function. The chemical abundance pattern of all detectable elements in these stars is consistent with that of the Galactic halo. However, all four stars have undetectable amounts of neutron-capture elements Sr and Ba, with upper limits comparable to the lowest ever detected in the halo or in other dwarf galaxies. One star exhibits significant radial velocity variations over time, suggesting it to be in a binary system. Its variable velocity has likely increased past determinations of the Boo II velocity dispersion. Our four stars span a limited metallicity range, but their enhanced {\alpha}-abundances and low neutron-capture abundances are consistent with the interpretation that Boo II has been enriched by very few generations of stars. The chemical abundance pattern in Boo II confirms the emerging trend that the faintest dwarf galaxies have neutron-capture abundances distinct from the halo, suggesting the dominant source of neutron-capture elements in halo stars may be different than in ultra-faint dwarfs.
  • We present the largest number of Milky Way sized dark matter halos simulated at very high mass ($\sim$$10^4$ M$_\odot$/particle) and temporal resolution ($\sim$5 Myrs/snapshot) done to date, quadrupling what is currently available in the literature. This initial suite consists of the first 24 halos of the $Caterpillar$ $Project$ (www.caterpillarproject.org) whose project goal of 60 - 70 halos will be made public when complete. We resolve $\sim$20,000 gravitationally bound subhalos within the virial radius of each host halo. Over the ranges set by our spatial resolution our convergence is excellent and improvements were made upon current state-of-the-art halo finders to better identify substructure at such high resolutions (e.g., on average we recover $\sim$4 subhalos in each host halo above 10$^8$ M$_\odot$ which would have otherwise not been found using conventional methods). For our relaxed halos, the inner profiles are reasonably fit by Einasto profiles ($\alpha$ = 0.169 $\pm$ 0.023) though this depends on the relaxed nature and assembly history of a given halo. Averaging over all halos, the substructure mass fraction is $f_{m,subs} = 0.121 \pm 0.041$, and mass function slope is d$N$/d$M\propto M^{-1.88 \pm 0.10}$ though we find scatter in the normalizations for fixed halo mass due to more concentrated hosts having less subhalos at fixed subhalo mass. There are no biases stemming from Lagrangian volume selection as all Lagrangian volume types are included in our sample. Our detailed contamination study of 264 low resolution halos has resulted in obtaining very large and unprecedented, high-resolution regions around our host halos for our target resolution (sphere of radius $\sim$$1.4 \pm 0.4$ Mpc) allowing for accurate studies of low mass dwarf galaxies at large galactocentric radii and the very first stellar systems at high redshift ($z \geq$ 10).