• In the current data-driven science era, it is needed that data analysis techniques has to quickly evolve to face with data whose dimensions has increased up to the Petabyte scale. In particular, being modern astrophysics based on multi-wavelength data organized into large catalogues, it is crucial that the astronomical catalog cross-matching methods, strongly dependant from the catalogues size, must ensure efficiency, reliability and scalability. Furthermore, multi-band data are archived and reduced in different ways, so that the resulting catalogues may differ each other in formats, resolution, data structure, etc, thus requiring the highest generality of cross-matching features. We present $C^{3}$ (Command-line Catalogue Cross-match), a multi-platform application designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues from modern surveys. Conceived as a stand-alone command-line process or a module within generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, it provides the maximum flexibility, in terms of portability, configuration, coordinates and cross-matching types, ensuring high performance capabilities by using a multi-core parallel processing paradigm and a sky partitioning algorithm.
  • The degradation of spatial resolution in star-forming regions observed at large distances ($d\gtrsim1$ kpc) with Herschel,can lead to estimates of the physical parameters of the detected compact sources (clumps) which do not necessarily mirror the properties of the original population of cores. This paper aims at quantifying the bias introduced in the estimation of these parameters by the distance effect. To do so, we consider Herschel maps of nearby star-forming regions taken from the Herschel-Gould-Belt survey, and simulate the effect of increased distance to understand what amount of information is lost when a distant star-forming region is observed with Herschel resolution. In the maps displaced to different distances we extract compact sources, and we derive their physical parameters as if they were original Hi-GAL maps of the extracted source samples. In this way, we are able to discuss how the main physical properties change with distance. In particular, we discuss the ability of clumps to form massive stars: we estimate the fraction of distant sources that are classified as high-mass stars-forming objects due to their position in the mass vs radius diagram, that are only "false positives". We give also a threshold for high-mass star-formation $M>1282 \ \left(\frac{r}{[\mathrm{pc}]}\right)^{1.42} M_{\odot}$. In conclusion, this paper provides the astronomer dealing with Herschel maps of distant star-forming regions with a set of prescriptions to partially recover the character of the core population in unresolved clumps.
  • Modern Astrophysics is based on multi-wavelength data organized into large and heterogeneous catalogues. Hence, the need for efficient, reliable and scalable catalogue cross-matching methods plays a crucial role in the era of the petabyte scale. Furthermore, multi-band data have often very different angular resolution, requiring the highest generality of cross-matching features, mainly in terms of region shape and resolution. In this work we present $C^{3}$ (Command-line Catalogue Cross-match), a multi-platform application designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues. It is based on a multi-core parallel processing paradigm and conceived to be executed as a stand-alone command-line process or integrated within any generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, providing the maximum flexibility to the end-user, in terms of portability, parameter configuration, catalogue formats, angular resolution, region shapes, coordinate units and cross-matching types. Using real data, extracted from public surveys, we discuss the cross-matching capabilities and computing time efficiency also through a direct comparison with some publicly available tools, chosen among the most used within the community, and representative of different interface paradigms. We verified that the $C^{3}$ tool has excellent capabilities to perform an efficient and reliable cross-matching between large datasets. Although the elliptical cross-match and the parametric handling of angular orientation and offset are known concepts in the astrophysical context, their availability in the presented command-line tool makes $C^{3}$ competitive in the context of public astronomical tools.
  • The emerging need for efficient, reliable and scalable astronomical catalog cross-matching is becoming more pressing in the current data-driven science era, where the size of data has rapidly increased up to the Petabyte scale. C3 (Command-line Catalogue Cross-matching) is a multi-platform tool designed to efficiently cross-match massive catalogues from modern astronomical surveys, ensuring high-performance capabilities through the use of a multi-core parallel processing paradigm. The tool has been conceived to be executed as a stand-alone command-line process or integrated within any generic data reduction/analysis pipeline, providing the maximum flexibility to the end user, in terms of parameter configuration, coordinates and cross-matching types. In this work we present the architecture and the features of the tool. Moreover, since the modular design of the tool enables an easy customization to specific use cases and requirements, we present also an example of a customized C3 version designed and used in the FP7 project ViaLactea, dedicated to cross-correlate Hi-GAL clumps with multi-band compact sources.
  • We present an innovative method called FilExSeC (Filaments Extraction, Selection and Classification), a data mining tool developed to investigate the possibility to refine and optimize the shape reconstruction of filamentary structures detected with a consolidated method based on the flux derivative analysis, through the column-density maps computed from Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) observations of the Galactic plane. The present methodology is based on a feature extraction module followed by a machine learning model (Random Forest) dedicated to select features and to classify the pixels of the input images. From tests on both simulations and real observations the method appears reliable and robust with respect to the variability of shape and distribution of filaments. In the cases of highly defined filament structures, the presented method is able to bridge the gaps among the detected fragments, thus improving their shape reconstruction. From a preliminary "a posteriori" analysis of derived filament physical parameters, the method appears potentially able to add a sufficient contribution to complete and refine the filament reconstruction.
  • The VIALACTEA project aims at building a predictive model of star formation in our galaxy. We present the innovative integrated framework and the main technologies and methodologies to reach this ambitious goal.
  • High-energy phenomena in the cosmos, and in particular processes leading to the emission of gamma- rays in the energy range 10 MeV - 100 GeV, play a very special role in the understanding of our Universe. This energy range is indeed associated with non-thermal phenomena and challenging particle acceleration processes. The technology involved in detecting gamma-rays is challenging and drives our ability to develop improved instruments for a large variety of applications. GAMMA-LIGHT is a Small Mission which aims at an unprecedented advance of our knowledge in many sectors of astrophysical and Earth studies research. The Mission will open a new observational window in the low-energy gamma-ray range 10-50 MeV, and is configured to make substantial advances compared with the previous and current gamma-ray experiments (AGILE and Fermi). The improvement is based on an exquisite angular resolution achieved by GAMMA-LIGHT using state-of-the-art Silicon technology with innovative data acquisition. GAMMA-LIGHT will address all astrophysics issues left open by the current generation of instruments. In particular, the breakthrough angular resolution in the energy range 100 MeV - 1 GeV is crucial to resolve patchy and complex features of diffuse sources in the Galaxy as well as increasing the point source sensitivity. This proposal addresses scientific topics of great interest to the community, with particular emphasis on multifrequency correlation studies involving radio, optical, IR, X-ray, soft gamma-ray and TeV emission. At the end of this decade several new observatories will be operational including LOFAR, SKA, ALMA, HAWK, CTA. GAMMA-LIGHT will "fill the vacuum" in the 10 MeV-10 GeV band, and will provide invaluable data for the understanding of cosmic and terrestrial high-energy sources.
  • Outflows generated by protostars heavily affect the kinematics and chemistry of the hosting molecular cloud through strong shocks that enhance the abundance of some molecules. L1157 is the prototype of chemically active outflows, and a strong shock, called B1, is taking place in its blue lobe between the precessing jet and the hosting cloud. We present the Herschel-PACS 55--210 micron spectra of the L1157-B1 shock, showing emission lines from CO, H2O, OH, and [OI]. The spatial resolution of the PACS spectrometer allows us to map the warm gas traced by far-infrared (FIR) lines with unprecedented detail. The rotational diagram of the high-Jup CO lines indicates high-excitation conditions (Tex ~ 210 +/- 10 K). We used a radiative transfer code to model the hot CO gas emission observed with PACS and in the CO (13-12) and (10-9) lines measured by Herschel-HIFI. We derive 200<Tkin<800 K and n>10^5 cm-3. The CO emission comes from a region of about 7 arcsec located at the rear of the bow shock where the [OI] and OH emission also originate. Comparison with shock models shows that the bright [OI] and OH emissions trace a dissociative J-type shock, which is also supported by a previous detection of [FeII] at the same position. The inferred mass-flux is consistent with the "reverse" shock where the jet is impacting on the L1157-B1 bow shock. The same shock may contribute significantly to the high-Jup CO emission.
  • We discuss the potential of high sensitivity mid-IR and far-IR spectroscopy to proof the physical properties of active nuclei and starburst regions of local and distant galaxies. For local galaxies, it will be possible to map the discs and ISM through the low ionization ionic lines and a variety of molecular tracers, such as OH, H2O and high-J CO. At increasing distance, most of the ionic nebular lines (typical of stars and AGNs) are shifted into the FIR, making possible to compare the observed spectra with those predicted by different evolutionary scenarios. At the very high redshift of 10-15, sensitive mid-to-far-IR spectrometers, such as those planned to be at the focal plane of the future SPICA mision, could be adequate to detect the H recombination lines excited in the HII regions around population III stars, if these stars happened to reside in large clusters of more than 10^5 members.
  • The Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite has allowed for the first time to investigate the whole far infrared (FIR) part of the spectrum (from 43 to 197 um), inaccessible from the ground. The FIR spectrum is crucial for the study of the early phases of protostellar evolution since the peak of the continuum emission of the protostars falls around 100 um and many molecular species emit in this range. In this paper we review the main results of the spectroscopic observations carried out with the LWS on a sample of pre-Main Sequence objects in different evolutionary stages. The FIR spectra are characterized by a strong continuum with superimposed atomic and molecular emission lines. The fine structure lines emitted by the OI and CII atoms are present in all the objects of our sample while emission from molecular species (CO, H_2O and OH) dominate the spectrum of the younger and more embedded objects; lines of highly ionized atoms (OIII, NIII, NII) are present only in high luminosity sources. We will show how both the FIR continuum and the emission lines are powerful indicators of the evolutionary status of young embedded objects. The analysis of the LWS spectra has allowed to study only the average properties of the young stellar objects, due to the large field of view (~ 80 arcsec), the limited sensitivity and the poor spectral resolution (~ 200) of the instrument in its grating mode. The higher spatial and spectral resolutions of the instruments on board the Herschel satellite will allow to address in deeper detail the scientific problems highlighted by the ISO results.