• We present the first resolved image of the debris disk around the 16+/-8 Myr old star, HD 114082. The observation was made in the H-band using the SPHERE instrument. The star is at a distance of 92+/-6 pc in the Lower Centaurus Crux association. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, we determined that the debris is likely in the form of a dust ring with an inner edge of 27.7+2.8/-3.5 au, position angle -74+0.5/-1.5 deg, and an inclination with respect to the line of sight of 6.7+3.8/-0.4 deg. The disk imaged in scattered light has a surface density declining with radius like ~r^(-4), steeper than expected for grain blowout by radiation pressure. We find only marginal evidence (2 sigma) of eccentricity, and rule out planets more massive than 1.0 Mjup orbiting within 1 au of the ring's inner edge, since such a planet would have disrupted the disk. The disk has roughly the same fractional disk luminosity (Ldisk/L*=3.3x10^(-3)) as HR4796A and Beta Pictoris, however it was not detected by previous instrument facilities most likely because of its small angular size (radius~0.4"), low albedo (~0.2) and low scattering efficiency far from the star due to high scattering anisotropy. With the arrival of extreme adaptive optics systems like SPHERE and GPI, the morphology of smaller, fainter and more distant debris disks are being revealed, providing clues to planet-disk interactions in young protoplanetary systems.
  • The debris disk known as "The Moth" is named after its unusually asymmetric surface brightness distribution. It is located around the ~90 Myr old G8V star HD 61005 at 34.5 pc and has previously been imaged by the HST at 1.1 and 0.6 microns. Polarimetric observations suggested that the circumstellar material consists of two distinct components, a nearly edge-on disk or ring, and a swept-back feature, the result of interaction with the interstellar medium. We resolve both components at unprecedented resolution with VLT/NACO H-band imaging. Using optimized angular differential imaging techniques to remove the light of the star, we reveal the disk component as a distinct narrow ring at inclination i=84.3 \pm 1.0{\deg}. We determine a semi-major axis of a=61.25 \pm 0.85 AU and an eccentricity of e=0.045 \pm 0.015, assuming that periastron is located along the apparent disk major axis. Therefore, the ring center is offset from the star by at least 2.75 \pm 0.85 AU. The offset, together with a relatively steep inner rim, could indicate a planetary companion that perturbs the remnant planetesimal belt. From our imaging data we set upper mass limits for companions that exclude any object above the deuterium-burning limit for separations down to 0.3". The ring shows a strong brightness asymmetry along both the major and minor axis. A brighter front side could indicate forward-scattering grains, while the brightness difference between the NE and SW components can be only partly explained by the ring center offset, suggesting additional density enhancements on one side of the ring. The swept-back component appears as two streamers originating near the NE and SW edges of the debris ring.