• Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) are common in solar flares and are now regularly observed in stellar flares. We present the detection of two different types of QPP signals in the thermal emission light curves of the X9.3 class solar flare SOL2017-09-06T12:02, which is the most powerful flare of Cycle 24. The period of the shorter-period QPP drifts from about 12 to 25 seconds during the flare. The observed properties of this QPP are consistent with a sausage oscillation of a plasma loop in the flaring active region. The period of the longer-period QPP is about 4 to 5 minutes. Its properties are compatible with standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations, which are often detected in coronal loops. For both QPP signals, other mechanisms such as repetitive reconnection cannot be ruled out, however. The studied solar flare has an energy in the realm of observed stellar flares, and the fact that there is evidence of a short-period QPP signal typical of solar flares along with a long-period QPP signal more typical of stellar flares suggests that the different ranges of QPP periods typically observed in solar and stellar flares is likely due to observational constraints, and that similar physical processes may be occurring in solar and stellar flares.
  • We present high cadence detections of two superflares from a bright G8 star (V = 11.56) with the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS). We improve upon previous superflare detections by resolving the flare rise and peak, allowing us to fit a solar flare inspired model without the need for arbitrary break points between rise and decay. Our data also enables us to identify substructure in the flares. From changing starspot modulation in the NGTS data we detect a stellar rotation period of 59 hours, along with evidence for differential rotation. We combine this rotation period with the observed \textit{ROSAT} X-ray flux to determine that the star's X-ray activity is saturated. We calculate the flare bolometric energies as $5.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\times10^{34}$ and $2.6^{+0.4}_{-0.3}\times10^{34}$ erg and compare our detections with G star superflares detected in the \textit{Kepler} survey. We find our main flare to be one of the largest amplitude superflares detected from a bright G star. With energies more than 100 times greater than the Carrington event, our flare detections demonstrate the role that ground-based instruments such as NGTS can have in assessing the habitability of Earth-like exoplanets, particularly in the era of \textit{PLATO}.
  • Flares that are orders of magnitude larger than the most energetic solar flares are routinely observed on Sun-like stars, raising the question of whether the same physical processes are responsible for both solar and stellar flares. In this letter we present a white-light stellar superflare on the star KIC9655129, observed by NASA's Kepler mission, with a rare multi-period quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) pattern. Two significant periodic processes were detected using the wavelet and autocorrelation techniques, with periods of 78 +/- 12 min and 32 +/- 2 min. By comparing the phases and decay times of the two periodicities, the QPP signal was found to most likely be linear, suggesting that the two periodicities are independent, possibly corresponding either to different magnetohydrodynamic modes of the flaring region, or different spatial harmonics of the same mode. The presence of multiple periodicities is a good indication that the QPPs were caused by magnetohydrodynamic oscillations, and suggests that the physical processes in operation during stellar flares could be the same as those in solar flares.
  • Stellar models generally use simple parametrizations to treat convection. The most widely used parametrization is the so-called "Mixing Length Theory" where the convective eddy sizes are described using a single number, \alpha, the mixing-length parameter. This is a free parameter, and the general practice is to calibrate \alpha using the known properties of the Sun and apply that to all stars. Using data from NASA's Kepler mission we show that using the solar-calibrated \alpha is not always appropriate, and that in many cases it would lead to estimates of initial helium abundances that are lower than the primordial helium abundance. Kepler data allow us to calibrate \alpha for many other stars and we show that for the sample of stars we have studied, the mixing-length parameter is generally lower than the solar value. We studied the correlation between \alpha and stellar properties, and we find that \alpha increases with metallicity. We therefore conclude that results obtained by fitting stellar models or by using population-synthesis models constructed with solar values of \alpha are likely to have large systematic errors. Our results also confirm theoretical expectations that the mixing-length parameter should vary with stellar properties.
  • The aim of this paper is to investigate whether there are any 11-yr or quasi-biennial solar cycle-related variations in solar rotational splitting frequencies of low-degree solar p modes. Although no 11-yr signals were observed, variations on a shorter timescale (~2yrs) were apparent. We show that the variations arose from complications/artifacts associated with the realization noise in the data and the process by which the data were analyzed. More specifically, the realization noise was observed to have a larger effect on the rotational splittings than accounted for by the formal uncertainties. When used to infer the rotation profile of the Sun these variations are not important. The outer regions of the solar interior can be constrained using higher-degree modes. While the variations in the low-l splittings do make large differences to the inferred rotation rate of the core, the core rotation rate is so poorly constrained, even by low-l modes, that the different inferred rotation profiles still agree within their respective 1sigma uncertainties. By contrast, in asteroseismology, only low-l modes are visible and so higher-l modes cannot be used to constrain the rotation profile of stars. Furthermore, we usually only have one data set from which to measure the observed low-l splitting. In such circumstances the inferred internal rotation rate of a main sequence star could differ significantly from estimates of the surface rotation rate, hence leading to spurious conclusions. Therefore, extreme care must be taken when using only the splittings of low-l modes to draw conclusions about the average internal rotation rate of a star.
  • Photometric observations made by the NASA Kepler Mission have led to a dramatic increase in the number of main-sequence and subgiant stars with detected solar-like oscillations. We present an ensemble asteroseismic analysis of 76 solar-type stars. Using frequencies determined from the Kepler time-series photometry, we have measured three asteroseismic parameters that characterize the oscillations: the large frequency separation (\Delta \nu), the small frequency separation between modes of l=0 and l=2 (\delta \nu_02), and the dimensionless offset (\epsilon). These measurements allow us to construct asteroseismic diagrams, namely the so-called C-D diagram of \delta \nu_02 versus \Delta \nu, and the recently re-introduced {\epsilon} diagram. We compare the Kepler results with previously observed solar-type stars and with theoretical models. The positions of stars in these diagrams places constraints on their masses and ages. Additionally, we confirm the observational relationship between {\epsilon} and T_eff that allows for the unambiguous determination of radial order and should help resolve the problem of mode identification in F stars.
  • Red giants are evolved stars that have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and instead burn hydrogen in a surrounding shell. Once a red giant is sufficiently evolved, the helium in the core also undergoes fusion. Outstanding issues in our understanding of red giants include uncertainties in the amount of mass lost at the surface before helium ignition and the amount of internal mixing from rotation and other processes. Progress is hampered by our inability to distinguish between red giants burning helium in the core and those still only burning hydrogen in a shell. Asteroseismology offers a way forward, being a powerful tool for probing the internal structures of stars using their natural oscillation frequencies. Here we report observations of gravity-mode period spacings in red giants that permit a distinction between evolutionary stages to be made. We use high-precision photometry obtained with the Kepler spacecraft over more than a year to measure oscillations in several hundred red giants. We find many stars whose dipole modes show sequences with approximately regular period spacings. These stars fall into two clear groups, allowing us to distinguish unambiguously between hydrogen-shell-burning stars (period spacing mostly about 50 seconds) and those that are also burning helium (period spacing about 100 to 300 seconds).
  • In addition to the well-known 11-year solar cycle, the Sun's magnetic activity also shows significant variation on shorter time scales, e.g. between one and two years. We observe a quasi-biennial (2-year) signal in the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies, which are sensitive probes of the solar interior. The signal is visible in Sun-as-a-star data observed by different instruments and here we describe the results obtained using BiSON, GOLF, and VIRGO data. Our results imply that the 2-year signal is susceptible to the influence of the main 11-year solar cycle. However, the source of the signal appears to be separate from that of the 11-year cycle. We speculate as to whether it might be the signature of a second dynamo, located in the region of near-surface rotational shear.
  • The Sun is a variable star whose magnetic activity varies most perceptibly on a timescale of approximately 11 years. However, significant variation is also observed on much shorter timescales. We observe a quasi-biennial (2 year) signal in the natural oscillation frequencies of the Sun. The oscillation frequencies are sensitive probes of the solar interior and so by studying them we can gain information about conditions beneath the solar surface. Our results point strongly to the 2 year signal being distinct and separate from, but nevertheless susceptible to the influence of, the main 11 year solar cycle.
  • Although there are now some tentative signs that the start of cycle 24 has begun there is still considerable interest in the somewhat unusual behaviour of the current solar minimum and the apparent delay in the true start of the next cycle. While this behaviour is easily tracked by observing the change in surface activity a question can also be asked about what is happening beneath the surface where the magnetic activity ultimately originates? In order to try to answer this question we can look at the behaviour of the frequencies of the Sun's natural seismic modes of oscillation - the p modes. These seismic frequencies also respond to changes in activity and are probes of conditions in the solar interior. The Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) has made measurements of low-degree (low-$\ell$) p mode frequencies over the last three solar cycles, and so is in a unique position to explore the current unusual and extended solar minimum. We compare the frequency shifts in the low-$\ell$ p-modes obtained from the BiSON data with the change in surface activity as measured by different proxies and show there are significant differences especially during the declining phase of solar cycle 23 and into the current minimum. We also observe quasi-biennial periodic behaviour in the p mode frequencies over the last 2 cycles that, unlike in the surface measurements, seems to be present at mid- and low-activity levels. Additionally we look at the frequency shifts of individual $\ell$ modes.
  • The Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) has collected helioseismic data over three solar cycles. We use these data to determine how the internal properties of the Sun during this minimum differ from the previous two minima. The cycle 24 data show oscillatory differences with respect to the other two sets, indicating relatively localized changes in the solar interior. Analysis of MDI data from Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 also show significant signs of differences.