• Future wireless systems are expected to provide a wide range of services to more and more users. Advanced scheduling strategies thus arise not only to perform efficient radio resource management, but also to provide fairness among the users. On the other hand, the users' perceived quality, i.e., Quality of Experience (QoE), is becoming one of the main drivers within the schedulers design. In this context, this paper starts by providing a comprehension of what is QoE and an overview of the evolution of wireless scheduling techniques. Afterwards, a survey on the most recent QoE-based scheduling strategies for wireless systems is presented, highlighting the application/service of the different approaches reported in the literature, as well as the parameters that were taken into account for QoE optimization. Therefore, this paper aims at helping readers interested in learning the basic concepts of QoE-oriented wireless resources scheduling, as well as getting in touch with its current research frontier.
  • Major cloud computing operators provide powerful monitoring tools to understand the current (and prior) state of the distributed systems deployed in their infrastructure. While such tools provide a detailed monitoring mechanism at scale, they also pose a significant challenge for the application developers/operators to transform the huge space of monitored metrics into useful insights. These insights are essential to build effective management tools for improving the efficiency, resiliency, and dependability of distributed systems. This paper reports on our experience with building and deploying Sieve - a platform to derive actionable insights from monitored metrics in distributed systems. Sieve builds on two core components: a metrics reduction framework, and a metrics dependency extractor. More specifically, Sieve first reduces the dimensionality of metrics by automatically filtering out unimportant metrics by observing their signal over time. Afterwards, Sieve infers metrics dependencies between distributed components of the system using a predictive-causality model by testing for Granger Causality. We implemented Sieve as a generic platform and deployed it for two microservices-based distributed systems: OpenStack and ShareLatex. Our experience shows that (1) Sieve can reduce the number of metrics by at least an order of magnitude (10 - 100$\times$), while preserving the statistical equivalence to the total number of monitored metrics; (2) Sieve can dramatically improve existing monitoring infrastructures by reducing the associated overheads over the entire system stack (CPU - 80%, storage - 90%, and network - 50%); (3) Lastly, Sieve can be effective to support a wide-range of workflows in distributed systems - we showcase two such workflows: orchestration of autoscaling, and Root Cause Analysis (RCA).
  • In-band full-duplex transmission allows a relay station to theoretically double its spectral efficiency by simultaneously receiving and transmitting in the same frequency band, when compared to the traditional half-duplex or out-of-band full-duplex counterpart. Consequently, the induced self-interference suffered by the relay may reach considerable power levels, which decreases the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) in a decode-and-forward (DF) relay, leading to a degradation of the relay performance. This paper presents a technique to cope with the problem of self-interference in broadband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) relays. The proposed method uses a time-domain cancellation in a DF relay, where a replica of the interfering signal is created with the help of a recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm that estimates the interference frequency-selective channel. Its convergence mean time is shown to be negligible by simulation results, when compared to the length of a typical orthogonal-frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) sequences. Moreover, the bit-error-rate (BER) and the SINR in a OFDM transmission are evaluated, confirming that the proposed method extends significantly the range of self-interference power to which the relay is resilient to, when compared with other mitigation schemes.
  • With the help of an in-band full-duplex relay station, it is possible to simultaneously transmit and receive signals from multiple users. The performance of such system can be greatly increased when the relay station is equipped with a large number of antennas on both transmitter and receiver sides. In this paper, we exploit the use of massive arrays to effectively suppress the loopback interference (LI) of a decode-and-forward relay (DF) and evaluate the performance of the end-to-end (e2e) transmission. This paper assumes imperfect channel state information is available at the relay and designs a minimum mean-square error (MMSE) filter to mitigate the interference. Subsequently, we adopt zero-forcing (ZF) filters for both detection and beamforming. The performance of such system is evaluated in terms of bit error rate (BER) at both relay and destinations, and an optimal choice for the transmission power at the relay is shown. We then propose a complexity efficient optimal power allocation (OPA) algorithm that, using the channel statistics, computes the minimum power that satisfies the rate constraints of each pair. The results obtained via simulation show that when both MMSE filtering and OPA method are used, better values for the energy efficiency are attained.
  • Disaster relief networks are designed to be adaptable and resilient so to encompass the demands of the emergency service. Cognitive Radio enhanced ad-hoc architecture has been put forward as a candidate to enable such networks. Spectrum sensing, the cornerstone of the Cognitive Radio paradigm, has been the focus of intensive research, from which the main conclusion was that its performance can be greatly enhanced through the use of cooperative sensing schemes. To apply the Cognitive Radio paradigm to Ad-hoc disaster relief networks, the design of effective cooperative spectrum sensing schemes is essential. In this paper we propose a cluster based orchestration cooperative sensing scheme, which adapts to the cluster nodes surrounding radio environment state as well as to the degree of correlation observed between those nodes. The proposed scheme is given both in a centralized as well as in a decentralized approach. In the centralized approach, the cluster head controls and adapts the distribution of the cluster sensing nodes according to the monitored spectrum state. While in the decentralized approach, each of the cluster nodes decides which spectrum it should monitor, according to the past local sensing decisions of the cluster nodes. The centralized and decentralized schemes can be combined to achieve a more robust cooperative spectrum sensing scheme. The proposed scheme performance is evaluated through a framework, which allows measuring the accuracy of the spectrum sensing cooperative scheme by measuring the error in the estimation of the monitored spectrum state. Through this evaluation it is shown that the proposed scheme outperforms the case where the choice of which spectrum to sense is done without using the knowledge obtained in previous sensing iterations, i.e. a implementation of a blind Round Robin scheme.