• Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of human brain cancer that is under active study in the field of cancer biology. Its rapid progression and the relative time cost of obtaining molecular data make other readily-available forms of data, such as images, an important resource for actionable measures in patients. Our goal is to utilize information given by medical images taken from GBM patients in statistical settings. To do this, we design a novel statistic---the smooth Euler characteristic transform (SECT)---that quantifies magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of tumors. Due to its well-defined inner product structure, the SECT can be used in a wider range of functional and nonparametric modeling approaches than other previously proposed topological summary statistics. When applied to a cohort of GBM patients, we find that the SECT is a better predictor of clinical outcomes than both existing tumor shape quantifications and common molecular assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that SECT features alone explain more of the variance in GBM patient survival than gene expression, volumetric features, and morphometric features. The main takeaways from our findings are thus twofold. First, they suggest that images contain valuable information that can play an important role in clinical prognosis and other medical decisions. Second, they show that the SECT is a viable tool for the broader study of medical imaging informatics.
  • We show that an embedding in Euclidean space based on tropical geometry generates stable sufficient statistics for barcodes. In topological data analysis, barcodes are multiscale summaries of algebraic topological characteristics that capture the `shape' of data; however, in practice, they have complex structures that make them difficult to use in statistical settings. The sufficiency result presented in this work allows for classical probability distributions to be assumed on the tropical geometric representation of barcodes. This makes a variety of parametric statistical inference methods amenable to barcodes, all while maintaining their initial interpretations. More specifically, we show that exponential family distributions may be assumed, and that likelihood functions for persistent homology may be constructed. We conceptually demonstrate sufficiency and illustrate its utility in persistent homology dimensions 0 and 1 with concrete parametric applications to human immunodeficiency virus and avian influenza data.
  • We introduce Lipschitz-Killing curvature (LKC) regression, a new method to produce $(1-\alpha)$ thresholds for signal detection in random fields that does not require knowledge of the spatial correlation structure. The idea is to fit observed empirical Euler characteristics to the Gaussian kinematic formula via generalized least squares, which quickly and easily provides statistical estimates of the LKCs --- complex topological quantities that can be extremely challenging to compute, both theoretically and numerically. With these estimates, we can then make use of a powerful parametric approximation via Euler characteristics for Gaussian random fields to generate accurate $(1-\alpha)$ thresholds and $p$-values. The main features of our proposed LKC regression method are easy implementation, conceptual simplicity, and facilitated diagnostics, which we demonstrate in a variety of simulations and applications.