• The Jansky Very Large Array was used to observe 121 magnetic cataclysmic variables (MCVs). We report radio detections of 19 stars. Fourteen are new radio sources, increasing the number of MCVs that are radio sources by more than twofold, from 8 to 22. Most detections are at 8.7 GHz (X-band) with a lesser number at 5.4 and 21.1 GHz (C- and K-bands). Most flux density limits are in the range of 47-470 uJy. With the exception of AE Aqr, the maximum flux detected is 818 uJy. Fourteen of the detections show approximately 100% circularly polarized emission, which is characteristic of electron-cyclotron maser emission. The data suggest that MCVs might be divided into two classes of radio emitters: those dominated by weakly polarized gyro-synchrotron emission and those by highly polarized electron-cyclotron maser emission.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • We present simulated images of Supernova 1993J at 8.4 GHz using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques. A spherically symmetric source model is convolved with realistic uv-plane distributions, together with standard imaging procedures, to assess the extent of instrumental effects on the recovered brightness distribution. In order to facilitate direct comparisons between the simulations and published VLBI images of SN1993J, the observed uv-coverage is determined from actual VLBI observations made in the years following its discovery. The underlying source model only exhibits radial variation in its density profile, with no azimuthal dependence and, even though this model is morphologically simple, the simulated VLBI observations qualitatively reproduce many of the azimuthal features of the reported VLBI observations, such as appearance and evolution of complex azimuthal structure and apparent rotation of the shell. We demonstrate that such features are inexorably coupled to the uv-plane sampling. The brightness contrast between the peaks and the surrounding shell material are not as prominent in the simulations (which of course assume no antenna- or baseline-based amplitude or phase errors, meaning no self-calibration procedures will have incorporated any such features in models). It is conclusive that incomplete uv-plane sampling has a drastic effect on the final images for observations of this nature. Difference imaging reveals residual emission up to the 8 sigma level. Extreme care should be taken when using interferometric observations to directly infer the structure of objects such as supernovae.
  • Multifrequency observations from the VLA, VLBA and OVRO Millimeter Array of a major radio outburst of Cygnus X-3 in 2001 September are presented, measuring the evolution of the spectrum of the source over three decades in frequency, over a period of six days. Following the peak of the flare, as the intensity declines the high-frequency spectrum at frequency nu steepens from nu^{-0.4} to nu^{-0.6}, after which the spectral index remains at this latter terminal value; a trend previously observed but hitherto not satisfactorily explained. VLBA observations, for the first time, track over several days the expansion of a sequence of knots whose initial diameters are approximately 8 milliarcseconds. The light-crossing time within these plasmons is of the same order as the time-scale over which the spectrum is observed to evolve. We contend that properly accounting for light-travel time effects in and between plasmons which are initially optically thick, but which after expansion become optically thin, explains the key features of the spectral evolution, for example the observed timescale. Using the VLBA images, we have directly measured for the first time the proper motions of individual knots, analysis of which shows a two-sided jet whose axis is precessing. The best-fit jet speed is roughly beta = 0.63 and the precession period is about 5 days, significantly lower than fitted for a previous flare. Extrapolation of the positions of the knots measured by the VLBA back to zero-separation shows this to occur approximately 2.5 days after the detection of the rise in flux density of Cygnus X-3.
  • We present the first milli-arcsecond resolution radio images of a radio-quiet quasar, detecting a high brightness temperature core with data from the VLBA. On maps made with lower-frequency data from MERLIN and the VLA jets appear to emanate from the core in opposite directions, which correspond to radio-emission on arcsecond scales seen with the VLA at higher frequencies. These provide strong evidence for a black-hole--based jet-producing central engine, rather than a starburst, being responsible for the compact radio emission in this radio-quiet quasar.