• We present a search for CII emission over cosmological scales at high-redshifts. The CII line is a prime candidate to be a tracer of star formation over large-scale structure since it is one of the brightest emission lines from galaxies. Redshifted CII emission appears in the submillimeter regime, meaning it could potentially be present in the higher frequency intensity data from the Planck satellite used to measure the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We search for CII emission over redshifts z=2-3.2 in the Planck 545 GHz intensity map by cross-correlating the 3 highest frequency Planck maps with spectroscopic quasars and CMASS galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), which we then use to jointly fit for CII intensity, CIB parameters, and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) emission. We report a measurement of an anomalous emission $\mathrm{I_\nu}=6.6^{+5.0}_{-4.8}\times10^4$ Jy/sr at 95% confidence, which could be explained by CII emission, favoring collisional excitation models of CII emission that tend to be more optimistic than models based on CII luminosity scaling relations from local measurements; however, a comparison of Bayesian information criteria reveal that this model and the CIB & SZ only model are equally plausible. Thus, more sensitive measurements will be needed to confirm the existence of large-scale CII emission at high redshifts. Finally, we forecast that intensity maps from Planck cross-correlated with quasars from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) would increase our sensitivity to CII emission by a factor of 5, while the proposed Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) could increase the sensitivity further.
  • We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. $E_G$ is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and $\sigma_8$. While traditionally, the lensing field for $E_G$ has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for $E_G$ at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of $E_G$ ever, up to 150 Mpc/$h$, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter $\beta$. We report $E_G(z=0.57)=0.243\pm0.060$ (stat) $\pm0.013$ (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity prediction at a level of 2.6$\sigma$. Note that our $E_G$ measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc/$h$, scales which have not been probed by previous $E_G$ tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.
  • Next-generation spectroscopic surveys will map the large-scale structure of the observable universe, using emission line galaxies as tracers. While each survey will map the sky with a specific emission line, interloping emission lines can masquerade as the survey's intended emission line at different redshifts. Interloping lines from galaxies that are not removed can contaminate the power spectrum measurement, mixing correlations from various redshifts and diluting the true signal. We assess the potential for power spectrum contamination, finding that an interloper fraction worse than 0.2% could bias power spectrum measurements for future surveys by more than 10% of statistical errors, while also biasing power spectrum inferences. We also construct a formalism for predicting cosmological parameter bias, demonstrating that a 0.15%-0.3% interloper fraction could bias the growth rate by more than 10% of the error, which can affect constraints on gravity upcoming surveys. We use the COSMOS Mock Catalog (CMC), with the emission lines re-scaled to better reproduce recent data, to predict potential interloper fractions for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) and the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST). We find that secondary line identification, or confirming galaxy redshifts by finding correlated emission lines, can remove interlopers for PFS. For WFIRST, we use the CMC to predict that the 0.2% target can be reached for the WFIRST H$\alpha$ survey, but sensitive optical and near-infrared photometry will be required. For the WFIRST [OIII] survey, the predicted interloper fractions reach several percent and their effects will have to be estimated and removed statistically (e.g. with deep training samples). (Abridged)
  • We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence $\kappa$, specifically by measuring $E_G$, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference with the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model $E_G$ for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that $E_G$ for $f(R)$ gravity should be scale-dependent due to the scale-dependence of the growth rate $f$. Next, we construct an estimator for $E_G$ in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the RSD parameter $\beta$. We also forecast statistical errors for $E_G$ from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9% with galaxies and 8% when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale-dependence of $E_G$ out to redshifts $z=2$ and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the $E_G$ sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and $f(R)$ gravity at the level of $3\sigma$ ($13\sigma$). Performing a $<1$% measurement of $E_G$ requires a 10% precision in $\beta$ from Euclid or LSST, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.
  • We describe the methodology to include nonlinear evolution, including tidal effects, in the computation of subhalo distribution properties in both cold (CDM) and warm (WDM) dark matter universes. Using semi-analytic modeling, we include effects from dynamical friction, tidal stripping, and tidal heating, allowing us to dynamically evolve the subhalo distribution. We calibrate our nonlinear evolution scheme to the CDM subhalo mass function in the Aquarius N-body simulation, producing a subhalo mass function within the range of simulations. We find tidal effects to be the dominant mechanism of nonlinear evolution in the subhalo population. Finally, we compute the subhalo mass function for $m_\chi=1.5$ keV WDM including the effects of nonlinear evolution, and compare radial number densities and mass density profiles of subhalos in CDM and WDM models. We show that all three signatures differ between the two dark matter models, suggesting that probes of substructure may be able to differentiate between them.
  • Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is predicted to lead to enhanced halo clustering on very large scales. Photometric quasars, which can be seen from cosmological redshifts z>2 even in wide-shallow optical surveys, are promising tracers for constraining non-Gaussianity using this effect. However, large-scale systematics can also mimic this signature of non-Gaussianity. In order to assess the contribution of systematic effects, we cross-correlate overdensity maps of photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 6 (DR6) in different redshift ranges. We find that the maps are significantly correlated on large scales, even though we expect the angular distributions of quasars at different redshifts to be uncorrelated. This implies that the quasar maps are contaminated with systematic errors. We investigate the use of external templates that provide information on the spatial dependence of potential systematic errors to reduce the level of spurious clustering in the quasar data. We find that templates associated with stellar density, the stellar color locus, airmass, and seeing are major contaminants of the quasar maps, with seeing having the largest effect. Using template projection, we are able to decrease the significance of the cross-correlation measurement on the largest scales from 9.2-sigma to 5.4-sigma. Although this is an improvement, the remaining cross-correlation suggests the contamination in this quasar sample is too great to allow a competitive constraint on fNL by correlations internal to this sample. The SDSS quasar catalog exhibits spurious number density fluctuations of ~2% rms, and we need a contamination level less than 1% (0.6%) in order to measure values of fNL less than 100 (10). Properly dealing with these systematics will be paramount for future large scale structure surveys that seek to constrain non-Gaussianity.
  • We search a sample of photometric luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for a quadrupolar anisotropy in the primordial power spectrum, in which P(\vec{k}) is an isotropic power spectrum P(k) multiplied by a quadrupolar modulation pattern. We first place limits on the 5 coefficients of a general quadrupole anisotropy. We also consider axisymmetric quadrupoles of the form P(\vec{k}) = P(k){1 + g_*[(\hat{k}\cdot\hat{n})^2-1/3]} where \hat{n} is the axis of the anisotropy. When we force the symmetry axis \hat{n} to be in the direction (l,b)=(94 degrees,26 degrees) identified in the recent Groeneboom et al. analysis of the cosmic microwave background, we find g_*=0.006+/-0.036 (1 sigma). With uniform priors on \hat{n} and g_* we find that -0.41<g_*<+0.38 with 95% probability, with the wide range due mainly to the large uncertainty of asymmetries aligned with the Galactic Plane. In none of these three analyses do we detect evidence for quadrupolar power anisotropy in large scale structure.
  • Statistical isotropy of primordial perturbations is a common assumption in cosmology, but it is an assumption that should be tested. To this end, we develop cosmic microwave background statistics for a primordial power spectrum that depends on the direction, as well as the magnitude, of the Fourier wavevector. We first consider a simple estimator that searches in a model-independent way for anisotropy in the square of the temperature (and/or polarization) fluctuation. We then construct the minimum-variance estimators for the coefficients of a spherical-harmonic expansion of the direction-dependence of the primordial power spectrum. To illustrate, we apply these statistics to an inflation model with a quadrupole dependence of the primordial power spectrum on direction and find that a power quadrupole as small as 2.0% can be detected with the Planck satellite.
  • We search data from the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) for a gamma-ray line in the energy range 0.1-10 GeV from the 10 X 10 degree region around the Galactic center. Our null results lead to upper limits to the line flux from the Galactic center. Such lines may have appeared if the dark matter in the Galactic halo is composed of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range 0.1-10 GeV. For a given dark-matter-halo model, our null search translates to upper limits to the WIMP two-photon annihilation cross section as a function of WIMP mass. We show that for a toy model in which Majorana WIMPs in this mass range annihilate only to electron-positron pairs, these upper limits supersede those derived from measurements of the 511-keV line and continuum photons from internal bremsstrahlung at the Galactic center.