• We report complex band structure (CBS) calculations for the four late transition metal monoxides, MnO, FeO, CoO and NiO, in their paramagnetic phase. The CBS is obtained from density functional theory plus dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations to take into account correlation effects. The so-called $\beta$ parameters, governing the exponential decay of the transmission probability in the non-resonant tunneling regime of these oxides, are extracted from the CBS. Different model constructions are examined in the DMFT part of the calculation. The calculated $\beta$ parameters provide theoretical estimation for the decay length in the evanescent channel, which would be useful for tunnel junction applications of these materials.
  • To address ultimate precision in density-functional-theory calculations we employ the full-potential linearized augmented planewave + local-orbital (LAPW+lo) method and justify its usage as a benchmark method. LAPW+lo and two completely unrelated numerical approaches, multi-resolution analysis (MRA) and linear combination of atomic orbitals, yield total energies of atoms with a mean deviation of 0.9~{\mu}Ha and 0.2~{\mu}Ha, respectively. Spectacular agreement with the MRA is reached also for total and atomization energies of the G2-1 set consisting of 55 molecules. With the example of $\alpha$-iron we demonstrate the capability of LAPW+lo of reaching {\mu}Ha/atom precision also for periodic systems, which allows also for distinction between numerical precision and the accuracy of a given functional.
  • The GW approximation is a well-known method to improve electronic structure predictions calculated within density functional theory. In this work, we have implemented a computationally efficient GW approach that calculates central properties within the Matsubara-time domain using the modified version of Elk, the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) package. Continuous-pole expansion (CPE), a recently proposed analytic continuation method, has been incorporated and compared to the widely used Pade approximation. Full crystal symmetry has been employed for computational speedup. We have applied our approach to 18 well-studied semiconductors/insulators that cover a wide range of band gaps computed at the levels of single-shot G0W0, partially self-consistent GW0, and fully self-consistent GW (scGW). Our calculations show that G0W0 leads to band gaps that agree well with experiment for the case of simple s-p electron systems, whereas scGW is required for improving the band gaps in 3-d electron systems. In addition, GW0 almost always predicts larger band gap values compared to scGW, likely due to the substantial underestimation of screening effects. Both the CPE method and Pade approximation lead to similar band gaps for most systems except strontium titantate, suggesting further investigation into the latter approximation is necessary for strongly correlated systems. Our computed band gaps serve as important benchmarks for the accuracy of the Matsubara-time GW approach.
  • We present a new algorithm to analytically continue the self-energy of quantum many-body systems from Matsubara frequencies to the real axis. The method allows straightforward, unambiguous computation of electronic spectra for lattice models of strongly correlated systems from self-energy data that has been collected with state-of-the are continuous time solvers within dynamical mean field simulations. Using well-known analytical properties of the self-energy, the analytic continuation is cast into a constrained minimization problem that can be formulated as a quadratic programmable optimization with linear constraints. The algorithm is validated against exactly solvable finite size problems, showing that all features of the spectral function near the Femi level are very well reproduced and coarse features are reproduced for all energies. The method is applied to two well known lattice problems, the two-dimensional Hubbard model at half filling where the momentum dependence of the gap formation is studied, as well as a multi-band model of NiO, for which the spectral function can be directly compared to experiment. Agreement with results published results is very good.