• Here we study polysemy as a potential learning bias in vocabulary learning in children. Words of low polysemy could be preferred as they reduce the disambiguation effort for the listener. However, such preference could be a side-effect of another bias: the preference of children for nouns in combination with the lower polysemy of nouns with respect to other part-of-speech categories. Our results show that mean polysemy in children increases over time in two phases, i.e. a fast growth till the 31st month followed by a slower tendency towards adult speech. In contrast, this evolution is not found in adults interacting with children. This suggests that children have a preference for non-polysemous words in their early stages of vocabulary acquisition. Interestingly, the evolutionary pattern described above weakens when controlling for syntactic category (noun, verb, adjective or adverb) but it does not disappear completely, suggesting that it could result from acombination of a standalone bias for low polysemy and a preference for nouns.
  • Vocalizations and less often gestures have been the object of linguistic research over decades. However, the development of a general theory of communication with human language as a particular case requires a clear understanding of the organization of communication through other means. Infochemicals are chemical compounds that carry information and are employed by small organisms that cannot emit acoustic signals of optimal frequency to achieve successful communication. Here the distribution of infochemicals across species is investigated when they are ranked by their degree or the number of species with which it is associated (because they produce or they are sensitive to it). The quality of the fit of different functions to the dependency between degree and rank is evaluated with a penalty for the number of parameters of the function. Surprisingly, a double Zipf (a Zipf distribution with two regimes with a different exponent each) is the model yielding the best fit although it is the function with the largest number of parameters. This suggests that the world wide repertoire of infochemicals contains a chemical nucleus shared by many species and reminiscent of the core vocabularies found for human language in dictionaries or large corpora.
  • Linguistic laws constitute one of the quantitative cornerstones of modern cognitive sciences and have been routinely investigated in written corpora, or in the equivalent transcription of oral corpora. This means that inferences of statistical patterns of language in acoustics are biased by the arbitrary, language-dependent segmentation of the signal, and virtually precludes the possibility of making comparative studies between human voice and other animal communication systems. Here we bridge this gap by proposing a method that allows to measure such patterns in acoustic signals of arbitrary origin, without needs to have access to the language corpus underneath. The method has been applied to six different human languages, recovering successfully some well-known laws of human communication at timescales even below the phoneme and finding yet another link between complexity and criticality in a biological system. These methods further pave the way for new comparative studies in animal communication or the analysis of signals of unknown code.
  • Menzerath's law, the tendency of Z, the mean size of the parts, to decrease as X, the number of parts, increases is found in language, music and genomes. Recently, it has been argued that the presence of the law in genomes is an inevitable consequence of the fact that Z = Y/X, which would imply that Z scales with X as Z ~ 1/X. That scaling is a very particular case of Menzerath-Altmann law that has been rejected by means of a correlation test between X and Y in genomes, being X the number of chromosomes of a species, Y its genome size in bases and Z the mean chromosome size. Here we review the statistical foundations of that test and consider three non-parametric tests based upon different correlation metrics and one parametric test to evaluate if Z ~ 1/X in genomes. The most powerful test is a new non-parametric based upon the correlation ratio, which is able to reject Z ~ 1/X in nine out of eleven taxonomic groups and detect a borderline group. Rather than a fact, Z ~ 1/X is a baseline that real genomes do not meet. The view of Menzerath-Altmann law as inevitable is seriously flawed.
  • The importance of statistical patterns of language has been debated over decades. Although Zipf's law is perhaps the most popular case, recently, Menzerath's law has begun to be involved. Menzerath's law manifests in language, music and genomes as a tendency of the mean size of the parts to decrease as the number of parts increases in many situations. This statistical regularity emerges also in the context of genomes, for instance, as a tendency of species with more chromosomes to have a smaller mean chromosome size. It has been argued that the instantiation of this law in genomes is not indicative of any parallel between language and genomes because (a) the law is inevitable and (b) non-coding DNA dominates genomes. Here mathematical, statistical and conceptual challenges of these criticisms are discussed. Two major conclusions are drawn: the law is not inevitable and languages also have a correlate of non-coding DNA. However, the wide range of manifestations of the law in and outside genomes suggests that the striking similarities between non-coding DNA and certain linguistics units could be anecdotal for understanding the recurrence of that statistical law.
  • Parallels of Zipf's law of brevity, the tendency of more frequent words to be shorter, have been found in bottlenose dolphins and Formosan macaques. Although these findings suggest that behavioral repertoires are shaped by a general principle of compression, common marmosets and golden-backed uakaris do not exhibit the law. However, we argue that the law may be impossible or difficult to detect statistically in a given species if the repertoire is too small, a problem that could be affecting golden backed uakaris, and show that the law is present in a subset of the repertoire of common marmosets. We suggest that the visibility of the law will depend on the subset of the repertoire under consideration or the repertoire size.
  • The relationship between the size of the whole and the size of the parts in language and music is known to follow Menzerath-Altmann law at many levels of description (morphemes, words, sentences...). Qualitatively, the law states that larger the whole, the smaller its parts, e.g., the longer a word (in syllables) the shorter its syllables (in letters or phonemes). This patterning has also been found in genomes: the longer a genome (in chromosomes), the shorter its chromosomes (in base pairs). However, it has been argued recently that mean chromosome length is trivially a pure power function of chromosome number with an exponent of -1. The functional dependency between mean chromosome size and chromosome number in groups of organisms from three different kingdoms is studied. The fit of a pure power function yields exponents between -1.6 and 0.1. It is shown that an exponent of -1 is unlikely for fungi, gymnosperm plants, insects, reptiles, ray-finned fishes and amphibians. Even when the exponent is very close to -1, adding an exponential component is able to yield a better fit with regard to a pure power-law in plants, mammals, ray-finned fishes and amphibians. The parameters of Menzerath-Altmann law in genomes deviate significantly from a power law with a -1 exponent with the exception of birds and cartilaginous fishes.