• Finding ways to test the behaviour of quantum devices is a timely enterprise, especially in the light of the rapid development of quantum technologies. Device-independent self-testing is one desirable approach, as it makes minimal assumptions on the devices being tested. In this work, we address the question of which states can be self-tested. This has been answered recently in the bipartite case [Nat. Comm. 8, 15485 (2017)], while it is largely unexplored in the multipartite case, with only a few scattered results, using a variety of different methods: maximal violation of a Bell inequality, numerical SWAP method, stabilizer self-testing etc. In this work, we investigate a simple, and potentially unifying, approach: combining projections onto two-qubit spaces (projecting parties or degrees of freedom) and then using maximal violation of the tilted CHSH inequalities. This allows to obtain self-testing of Dicke states and partially entangled GHZ states with two measurements per party, and also to recover self-testing of graph states (previously known only through stabilizer methods). Finally, we give the first self-test of a class multipartite qudit states: we generalize the self-testing of partially entangled GHZ states by adapting techniques from [Nat. Comm. 8, 15485 (2017)], and show that all multipartite states which admit a Schmidt decomposition can be self-tested with few measurements.
  • To identify which principles characterize quantum correlations, it is essential to understand in which sense this set of correlations differs from that of almost quantum correlations. We solve this problem by invoking the so-called no-restriction hypothesis, an explicit and natural axiom in many reconstructions of quantum theory stating that the set of possible measurements is the dual of the set of states. We prove that, contrary to quantum correlations, no generalised probabilistic theory satisfying the no-restriction hypothesis is able to reproduce the set of almost quantum correlations. Therefore, any theory whose correlations are exactly, or very close to, the almost quantum correlations necessarily requires a rule limiting the possible measurements. Our results suggest that the no-restriction hypothesis may play a fundamental role in singling out the set of quantum correlations among other non-signalling ones.
  • We investigate the ability of correlation measures to witness non-Markovian open quantum system dynamics. It is shown that the mutual information and any entanglement measure between the system and an ancilla do not witness all non-Markovian dynamics. A new correlation measure is introduced, and it is proven that, in an enlarged setting with two ancillary systems, this measure detects almost all non-Markovian dynamics, except possibly a zero-measure set of dynamics that is non-bijective in finite time-intervals. Our proof is constructive and provides different initial states detecting the non-Markovian evolutions. These states are all separable and some are arbitrarily close to a product state.
  • The detection of nonlocal correlations in a Bell experiment implies almost by definition some intrinsic randomness in the measurement outcomes. For given correlations, or for a given Bell violation, the amount of randomness, quantified by the guessing probability, can generally be bounded numerically. However, currently only a few exact analytic solutions are known for violations of the bipartite Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality. Here, we study the randomness in a Bell experiment where three parties test the tripartite Mermin-Bell inequality. We give tight upper bounds on the guessing probabilities associated with one and two of the parties' measurement outcomes as a function of the Mermin inequality violation. Finally, we discuss the possibility of device-independent secret sharing based on the Mermin inequality and argue that the idea seems unlikely to work.
  • Device-independent quantum key distribution protocols allow two honest users to establish a secret key with minimal levels of trust on the provider, as security is proven without any assumption on the inner working of the devices used for the distribution. Unfortunately, the implementation of these protocols is challenging, as it requires the observation of a large Bell inequality violation between the two distant users. Here, we introduce novel photonic protocols for device-independent quantum key distribution exploiting single-photon sources and heralding-type architectures. The heralding process is designed so that transmission losses become irrelevant for security. We then show how the use of single-photon sources for entanglement distribution in these architectures, instead of standard entangled-pair generation schemes, provides significant improvements on the attainable key rates and distances over previous proposals. Given the current progress in single-photon sources, our work opens up a promising avenue for device-independent quantum distribution implementations.
  • The ability to control multidimensional quantum systems is key for the investigation of fundamental science and for the development of advanced quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate a multidimensional integrated quantum photonic platform able to robustly generate, control and analyze high-dimensional entanglement. We realize a programmable bipartite entangled system with dimension up to $15 \times 15$ on a large-scale silicon-photonics quantum circuit. The device integrates more than 550 photonic components on a single chip, including 16 identical photon-pair sources. We verify the high precision, generality and controllability of our multidimensional technology, and further exploit these abilities to demonstrate key quantum applications experimentally unexplored before, such as quantum randomness expansion and self-testing on multidimensional states. Our work provides a prominent experimental platform for the development of multidimensional quantum technologies.
  • We present self-testing protocols to certify the presence of tensor products of Pauli measurements on maximally entangled states of local dimension $2^n$ for $n\in\mathbb{N}$. This provides self-tests of sets of informationally complete measurements in arbitrarily high dimension. We then show that this can be used for the device-independent certification of the entanglement of all bipartite entangled states by exploiting a connection to measurement device-independent entanglement witnesses and quantum networks. This work extends a more compact parallel work on the same subject and provides all the required technical proofs.
  • While all bipartite pure entangled states are known to generate correlations violating a Bell inequality, and are therefore nonlocal, the quantitative relation between pure-state entanglement and nonlocality is poorly understood. In fact, some Bell inequalities are maximally violated by non-maximally entangled states and this phenomenon is also observed for other operational measures of nonlocality. In this work, we study a recently proposed measure of nonlocality defined as the probability that a pure state displays nonlocal correlations when subjected to random measurements. We first prove that this measure satisfies some natural properties for an operational measure of nonlocality. Then, we show that for pure states of two qubits the measure is monotonic with entanglement for all correlation two-outcome Bell inequalities: for all these inequalities, the more the state is entangled, the larger the probability to violate them when random measurements are performed. Finally, we extend our results to the multipartite setting.
  • While the interest in multipartite nonlocality has grown in recent years, its existence in large quantum systems is difficult to confirm experimentally. This is mostly due to the inadequacy of standard multipartite Bell inequalities to many-body systems: such inequalities usually rely on expectation values involving many parties and require an individual addressing of each party. In a recent work [J. Tura et al. Science 344, 6189 (2014)] some of us proposed simpler Bell inequalities overcoming such difficulties, opening the way for the detection of Bell correlations with trusted collective measurements through Bell correlation witnesses [R. Schmied et al. Science 352, 441 (2016)], hence demonstrating the presence of Bell correlations with assumptions on the statistics. Here, we address the question of assessing the number of particles sharing genuinely nonlocal correlations in a multipartite system. This endeavour is a priori challenging, as known Bell inequalities for genuine nonlocality suffer from the above shortcomings, plus a number of measurement settings scaling exponentially with the system size. We first show that most of these constraints drop once the witnesses corresponding to these inequalities are expressed: in systems where multipartite expectation values can be evaluated, these witnesses can reveal genuine nonlocality for an arbitrary number of particles with just two collective measurements. We then introduce a general framework focused on two-body Bell-like inequalities. We show that they also provide information about the number of particles that are genuinely nonlocal. Then, we characterize all such inequalities for a finite system size. We provide witnesses of Bell correlation depth $k\leq6$ for any number of parties, within experimental reach. A violation for depth $6$ is achieved with existing data from an ensemble of 480 atoms.
  • The outcomes of local measurements made on entangled systems can be certified to be random provided that the generated statistics violate a Bell inequality. This way of producing randomness relies only on a minimal set of assumptions because it is independent of the internal functioning of the devices generating the random outcomes. In this context it is crucial to understand both qualitatively and quantitatively how the three fundamental quantities -- entanglement, non-locality and randomness -- relate to each other. To explore these relationships, we consider the case where repeated (non projective) measurements are made on the physical systems, each measurement being made on the post-measurement state of the previous measurement. In this work, we focus on the following questions: For systems in a given entangled state, how many nonlocal correlations in a sequence can we obtain by measuring them repeatedly? And from this generated sequence of non-local correlations, how many random numbers is it possible to certify? In the standard scenario with a single measurement in the sequence, it is possible to generate non-local correlations between two distant observers only and the amount of random numbers is very limited. Here we show that we can overcome these limitations and obtain any amount of certified random numbers from an entangled pair of qubit in a pure state by making sequences of measurements on it. Moreover, the state can be arbitrarily weakly entangled. In addition, this certification is achieved by near-maximal violation of a particular Bell inequality for each measurement in the sequence. We also present numerical results giving insight on the resistance to imperfections and on the importance of the strength of the measurements in our scheme.
  • Non-local correlations that obey the no-signalling principle contain intrinsic randomness. In par- ticular, for a specific Bell experiment, one can derive relations between the amount of randomness produced, as quantified by the min-entropy of the output data, and its associated violation of a Bell inequality. In practice, due to finite sampling, certifying randomness requires the development of statistical tools to lower-bound the min-entropy of the data as a function of the estimated Bell viola- tion. The quality of such bounds relies on the choice of the certificate, i.e., the Bell inequality whose violation is estimated. In this work, we propose a method for choosing efficiently such a certificate. It requires sacrificing a part of the output data in order to estimate the underlying correlations. Regularizing this estimate then allows one to solve the related guessing probability problem, whose dual formulation provides a Bell inequality suitable for certifying practical randomness. In order to show the efficiency of our method, we carry out several numerical simulations of a Bell experiment: we nearly always obtain higher min-entropy rates than when we use a pre-established Bell inequality, namely the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality.
  • We present a method to certify the entanglement of all bipartite entangled quantum states in a device-independent way. This is achieved by placing the state in a quantum network and constructing a correlation inequality based on an entanglement witness for the state. Our method is device-independent, in the sense that entanglement can be certified from the observed statistics alone, under minimal assumptions on the underlying physics. Conceptually, our results borrow ideas from the field of self-testing to bring the recently introduced measurement-device-independent entanglement witnesses into the fully device-independent regime.
  • We introduce a framework for simulating quantum measurements based on classical processing of a set of accessible measurements. Well-known concepts such as joint measurability and projective simulability naturally emerge as particular cases of our framework, but our study also leads to novel results and questions. First, a generalisation of joint measurability is derived, which yields a hierarchy for the incompatibility of sets of measurements. A similar hierarchy is defined based on the number of outcomes used to perform the simulation of a given measurement. This general approach also allows us to identify connections between different types of simulability and, in particular, we characterise the qubit measurements that are projective-simulable in terms of joint measurability. Finally, we discuss how our framework can be interpreted in the context of resource theories.
  • In this article we extend results from our previous work [Bendersky, de la Torre, Senno, Figueira and Ac\'in, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 230406 (2016)] by providing a protocol to distinguish in finite time and with arbitrarily high success probability any algorithmic mixture of pure states from the maximally mixed state. Moreover, we introduce a proof-of-concept experiment consisting in a situation where two different random sequences of pure states are prepared; these sequences are indistinguishable according to quantum mechanics, but they become distinguishable when randomness is replaced with pseudorandomness within the preparation process.
  • This progress report covers recent developments in the area of quantum randomness, which is an extraordinarily interdisciplinary area that belongs not only to physics, but also to philosophy, mathematics, computer science, and technology. For this reason the article contains three parts that will be essentially devoted to different aspects of quantum randomness, and even directed, although not restricted, to various audiences: a philosophical part, a physical part, and a technological part. For these reasons the article is written on an elementary level, combining very elementary and non-technical descriptions with a concise review of more advanced results. In this way readers of various provenances will be able to gain while reading the article.
  • The concept of randomness plays an important role in many disciplines. On one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other hand, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions on the devices that are difficult to meet in practice. However, quantum technologies allow for new methods for generating certified randomness. These methods are known as device-independent because do not rely on any modeling of the devices. Here we review the efforts and challenges to design device-independent randomness generators.
  • Bell inequalities have traditionally been used to demonstrate that quantum theory is nonlocal, in the sense that there exist correlations generated from composite quantum states that cannot be explained by means of local hidden variables. With the advent of device-independent quantum information protocols, Bell inequalities have gained an additional role as certificates of relevant quantum properties. In this work we consider the problem of designing Bell inequalities that are tailored to detect maximally entangled states. We introduce a class of Bell inequalities valid for an arbitrary number of measurements and results, derive analytically their tight classical, non-signalling and quantum bounds and prove that the latter is attained by maximally entangled states. Our inequalities can therefore find an application in device-independent protocols requiring maximally entangled states.
  • We demonstrate frequency-bin entanglement between ultra-narrowband photons generated by cavity enhanced spontaneous parametric down conversion. Our source generates photon pairs in widely non-degenerate discrete frequency modes, with one photon resonant with a quantum memory material based on praseodymium doped crystals and the other photon at telecom wavelengths. Correlations between the frequency modes are analyzed using phase modulators and narrowband filters before detection. We show high-visibility two photon interference between the frequency modes, allowing us to infer a coherent superposition of the modes. We develop a model describing the state that we create and use it to estimate optimal measurements to achieve a violation of the Clauser-Horne (CH) Bell inequality under realistic assumptions. With these settings we perform a Bell test and show a significant violation of the CH inequality, thus proving the entanglement of the photons. Finally we demonstrate the compatibility with a quantum memory material by using a spectral hole in the praseodymium (Pr) doped crystal as spectral filter for measuring high-visibility two-photon interference. This demonstrates the feasibility of combining frequency-bin entangled photon pairs with Pr-based solid state quantum memories.
  • Entanglement is one of the most studied properties of quantum mechanics for its application in quantum information protocols. Nevertheless, detecting the presence of entanglement in large multipartite sates continues to be a great challenge both from the theoretical and the experimental point of view. Most of the known methods either have computational costs that scale inefficiently with the number of particles or require more information on the state than what is attainable in everyday experiments. We introduce a new technique for entanglement detection that provides several important advantages in these respects. First, it scales efficiently with the number of particles, thus allowing for application to systems composed by up to few tens of particles. Second, it needs only the knowledge of a subset of all possible measurements on the state, therefore being apt for experimental implementation. Moreover, since it is based on the detection of nonlocality, our method is device independent. We report several examples of its implementation for well-known multipartite states, showing that the introduced technique has a promising range of applications.
  • We present a method to show that low-energy states of quantum many-body interacting systems in one spatial dimension are nonlocal. We assign a Bell inequality to the Hamiltonian of the system in a natural way and we efficiently find its classical bound using dynamic programming. The Bell inequality is such that its quantum value for a given state, and for appropriate observables, corresponds to the energy of the state. Thus, the presence of nonlocal correlations can be certified for states of low enough energy. The method can also be used to optimize certain Bell inequalities: in the translationally invariant (TI) case, we provide an exponentially faster computation of the classical bound and analytically closed expressions of the quantum value for appropriate observables and Hamiltonians. The power and generality of our method is illustrated through four representative examples: a tight TI inequality for 8 parties, a quasi TI uniparametric inequality for any even number of parties, ground states of spin-glass systems, and a non-integrable interacting XXZ-like Hamiltonian. Our work opens the possibility for the use of low-energy states of commonly studied Hamiltonians as multipartite resources for quantum information protocols that require nonlocality.
  • Absolutely maximally entangled (AME) states are pure multi-partite generalizations of the bipartite maximally entangled states with the property that all reduced states of at most half the system size are in the maximally mixed state. AME states are of interest for multipartite teleportation and quantum secret sharing and have recently found new applications in the context of high-energy physics in toy models realizing the AdS/CFT-correspondence. We work out in detail the connection between AME states of minimal support and classical maximum distance separable (MDS) error correcting codes and, in particular, provide explicit closed form expressions for AME states of $n$ parties with local dimension $q$ a power of a prime for all $q \geq n-1$. Building on this, we construct a generalization of the Bell-basis consisting of AME states and develop a stabilizer formalism for AME states. For every $q \geq n-1$ prime we show how to construct QECCs that encode a logical qudit into a subspace spanned by AME states. Under a conjecture for which we provide numerical evidence, this construction produces a family of quantum error correcting codes $[\![n,1,n/2]\!]_q$ for $n$ even, saturating the quantum Singleton bound. We show that our conjecture is equivalent to the existence of an operator whose support cannot be decreased by multiplying it with stabilizer products and explicitly construct the codes up to $n = 8$.
  • We study correlations in fermionic lattice systems with long-range interactions in thermal equilibrium. We prove a bound on the correlation decay between anti-commuting operators and generalize a long-range Lieb-Robinson type bound. Our results show that in these systems of spatial dimension $D$ with, not necessarily translation invariant, two-site interactions decaying algebraically with the distance with an exponent $\alpha \geq 2\,D$, correlations between such operators decay at least algebraically with an exponent arbitrarily close to $\alpha$ at any non-zero temperature. Our bound is asymptotically tight, which we demonstrate by a high temperature expansion and by numerically analyzing density-density correlations in the 1D quadratic (free, exactly solvable) Kitaev chain with long-range pairing.
  • An open question of fundamental importance in thermodynamics is how to describe the fluctuations of work for quantum coherent processes. In the standard approach, based on a projective energy measurement both at the beginning and at the end of the process, the first measurement destroys any initial coherence in the energy basis. Here we seek for extensions of this approach which can possibly account for initially coherent states. We consider all measurement schemes to estimate work and require that (i) the difference of average energy corresponds to average work for closed quantum systems, and that (ii) the work statistics agree with the standard two-measurement scheme for states with no coherence in the energy basis. We first show that such a scheme cannot exist. Next, we consider the possibility of performing collective measurements on several copies of the state and prove that it is still impossible to satisfy simultaneously requirements (i) and (ii). Nevertheless, improvements do appear, and in particular we develop a measurement scheme which acts simultaneously on two copies of the state and allows to describe a whole class of coherent transformations.
  • Standard projective measurements represent a subset of all possible measurements in quantum physics, defined by positive-operator-valued measures. We study what quantum measurements are projective simulable, that is, can be simulated by using projective measurements and classical randomness. We first prove that every measurement on a given quantum system can be realised by classical processing of projective measurements on the system plus an ancilla of the same dimension. Then, given a general measurement in dimension two or three, we show that deciding whether it is projective-simulable can be solved by means of semi-definite programming. We also establish conditions for the simulation of measurements using projective ones valid for any dimension. As an application of our formalism, we improve the range of visibilities for which two-qubit Werner states do not violate any Bell inequality for all measurements. From an implementation point of view, our work provides bounds on the amount of noise a measurement tolerates before losing any advantage over projective ones.
  • Quantum systems allow one to sense physical parameters beyond the reach of classical statistics---with resolutions greater than $1/N$, where $N$ is the number of constituent particles independently probing a parameter. In the canonical phase sensing scenario the \emph{Heisenberg Limit} $1/N^{2}$ may be reached, which requires, as we show, both the relative size of the largest entangled block and the geometric measure of entanglement to be nonvanishing as $N\to\infty$. Yet, we also demonstrate that in the asymptotic $N$ limit any precision scaling arbitrarily close to the Heisenberg Limit ($1/N^{2-\varepsilon}$ with any $\varepsilon>0$) may be attained, even though the system gradually becomes noisier and separable, so that both the above entanglement quantifiers asymptotically vanish. Our work shows that sufficiently large quantum systems achieve nearly optimal resolutions despite their relative amount of entanglement being arbitrarily small. In deriving our results, we establish the continuity relation of the quantum Fisher information evaluated for a phaselike parameter, which lets us link it directly to the geometry of quantum states, and hence naturally to the geometric measure of entanglement.